Game #208: A Listless Game

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franktangredi
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Game #208: A Listless Game

#1 Post by franktangredi » Tue Sep 20, 2022 8:22 am

Anyone caught trying to inject political commentary into this game will be shot on sight.

Game #208: A Listless Game

Identify the 99 people in the clues below and match them into 33 trios according to a Tangredi, or principle you must discover for yourself. No names will be used twice.

Alternate solutions are likely, but only one combination will use all the names.

1. Though not generally known for his writings on social etiquette, he did offer this useful clarification: "A revolution is not a dinner party."

2. Even members of Congress from the segregated South voted in favor of funding a national monument to this man – the first such monument honoring an African American.

3. He is the only player to be named both MVP and Coach of the Year by the NBA

4. He won 21 Tony Awards for producing and/or directing works by Kern and Hammerstein, Bock and Harnick, Kander and Ebb, Adler and Ross, Stephen Sondheim, and Andrew Lloyd Weber.

5. After jumping ship in 1842, he lived for a time among the people of the Marquesas Islands – an adventure which provided the material for his first two books and gained him the reputation as the "man who lived among the cannibals.”.

6. A highly uncharacteristic rock ballad on his group’s final album was written in memory of his five-year-old son, who had died the year before.

7. He admonished his fellow business leaders that “the man who dies leaving behind him many millions of available wealth which was his to administer during life will pass away ‘unwept, unhonored, and unsung,’ no matter to what uses he leaves the dross which he cannot take with him. Of such as these the public verdict will then be: ‘The man who dies thus rich dies disgraced.’”

8. This activist stirred considerable controversy when he commented that the assassination of John F Kennedy was a case of “chickens coming home to roost.” (But, then, almost everything he said stirred controversy.)

9. This artist is best known for two historical paintings depicting the deaths of British military heroes at the moment of their greatest triumphs.

10. JMMQ (Judy Murphy Memorial Question): A Prima Ballerina during her 20 years with the Royal Ballet, she left them in 2001 to serve as a Creative Director for the Royal Opera House.
Another JMMQ appears at #69.

11. He took over Thomas Gage’s command in 1775; things didn’t go well after that.

12. This influential American sociologist did not coin the term “post-industrial society,” but in a 1973 book he correctly forecast that such a society would be information-led and service-oriented.

13. This physician completes a list that also includes Robert Morris, John Morton, George Clymer, James Smith, George Taylor, James Wilson, George Ross … and, of course, Benjamin Franklin.

14. This English physicist shared the Nobel Prize in Medicine for his work in developing magnetic resonance imaging.

15. In his nine seasons with the Denver Broncos, this Hall of Famer amassed a rushing total of 6,323 yards – at the time the 7th highest in the NFL.

16. This beloved Danish writer was not so beloved by Charles Dickens, who reportedly modeled the character of Uriah Heep on him.

17. This actor’s last two completed film roles were adaptations of works by Ernest Hemingway and Agatha Christie.

18. The career of this jazz trumpeter took off in the late 1950s when he began playing with Ornette Coleman; three decades later, his son and stepdaughter made their own appearances on the pop charts.

19. She is the linchpin of a romantic quadrangle formed by her husband Charles and her lovers Rodolphe and Léon.

20. In a 1900 obituary, the New York Times called this proponent of Reform Judaism “the foremost rabbi in America.”

21. In addition to his influence on political thought, education, and the development of Romanticism, this philosopher was also an advocate of breastfeeding.

22. Though she was hanged only for the poisoning of her stepson, she is believed to have murdered three of her four husbands and eleven of her thirteen children for their insurance. (She died of slow strangulation rather than a quick neck break, due to a ‘mistake’ on the part of the hangman.)

23. Longtime president of the organization Consumer Watchdog, this activist is also the author of such books as The Progressive’s Guide to Raising Hell.

24. In 1918, he sent an infamous telegram in which he recommended the public hanging of “no fewer than one hundred known kulaks, fat cats, and bloodsuckers.”

25. This American shared the Nobel Prize in Chemistry for his discoveries regarding ubiquitin-mediated protein degradation. (No, I haven’t any idea what that means.)

26. A classic Honeymooners episode about Ralph’s efforts to find the perfect gift for Alice was one of many works to borrow the basic premise of this author’s most famous work.

27. In 1965, a radio station in New York aired a special version of the latest hit by a popular vocal group in which this lead singer held a single note for over a minute. (No, it wasn’t Ethel Merman.)

28. This American tennis player won 18 Grand Slam championships between 1936 and 1940.

29. This actor lost the role in Ghostbusters that eventually went to his colleague Rick Moranis, but at least he got to appear in the music video.

30. In a 1908 English novel, he became one of the earliest – and still one of the greatest – portraits of a car freak and reckless driver in literary history.

31. This economist is best remembered for something he reportedly sketched on a cocktail napkin during a 1974 meeting with Dick Cheney and Donald Rumsfeld.

32. In addition to launching the “It’s Get Better” campaign, this columnist and activist was responsible for Rick Santorum’s “Google problem.”

33. She was the first First Lady to visit Sesame Street.

34. Son of a wealthy Kentucky slaveholding family, he converted to abolitionism while a student at Yale after hearing William Lloyd Garrison speak; he was later appointed ambassador to Russia by Abraham Lincoln and helped win the tsar’s support for the Union cause.

35. This French-American artist gained renown for her installations and monumental sculptures, especially a 30-feet high spider made of steel, bronze and marble.

36. After his lithography business failed in 1860, this businessman found a new way to succeed at the game of life.

37. In 1934, this American politician proposed a radical economic plan, the provisions of which included a cap on inheritances, incomes, and private fortunes; free higher education for all; a four-day work week with four weeks of paid vacation a year; and free medical service to all citizens.

38. Though this singer charted five number one and 18 top-ten singles on the Billboard country charts, her only crossover hit was a 1970 hit that went to #3 on the pop chart.

39. In addition to describing the genetic condition that now bears his name, this British physician was a pioneer in improving the treatment of the mentally disabled.

40. Though some critics find his lyricism ‘slow’ and others accuse him of glorifying poverty, he is still considered his country’s greatest filmmaker – placed by no less than Martin Scorsese on a par with his contemporaries Kurosawa, Bergman, and Fellini.

41. More than a century later, this poet and playwright remains the only Belgian to receive the Nobel Prize for Literature.

42. The high point of this pitcher’s nine-year career with the Pirates was a no-hitter against the Mets in 1969; the low point was a wild pitch in 1972 that sent the Reds into the World Series.

43. After a 1796 expedition down the Niger River, this explorer wrote a book theorizing that the Congo and the Niger eventually merged into a single river – a theory that was finally disproven until 1830.

44. He was the officer in charge of the defense of U.S. military installations in Hawaii on December 7, 1941. (The Senate absolved him of all responsibility … more than 50 years later.)

45. This English idealist philosopher’s two most important works, the Prolegomena to Ethics and the Lectures on the Principles of Political Obligation, were not published until after his death.

46. The best-known designs of this English architect include Buckingham Palace and the Royal Pavilion at Brighton.

47. The #MeToo movement brought renewed attention to this attorney and activist, who first emerged on the national stage more than two decades earlier.

48. This Houston-born diplomat was one of the most trusted advisors to the President of the United States, but after clashes at the Paris Peace Conference, the two never spoke again.

49. One of the great actor-managers of his day – and founder of the Royal Academy of Dramatic Arts – he was knighted in 1909 for his services to the British theatre.

50. In a career spanning 48 years, this lyricist put words to the music of – among others – Jerome Kern, Sigmund Romberg, Jimmy McHugh, Arthur Schwartz, and Cy Coleman.

51. At various times, his employees included Henry Ford, African American inventor Lewis Latimer, and film director Edwin S. Porter.

52. This English novelist is best known for a series of eleven novels published over a 30-year span and covering 43 years in the life of a civil servant named Lewis Eliot.

53. Winner of nine Triple Crown races, this jockey set a North American record in 1989 when he rode eight out of nine mounts to victory in a single day.

54. His rise to power was cemented by the murder of Paul Castellano.

55. A biography written by this minister is arguably the foundational document of American hagiography.

56. This chef’s restaurant La Pyramide was considered the finest in France during his lifetime, but it eventually lost all three of its Michelin stars after his death.

57. The business he founded in Venice, California in 1965 came to be known as “the Mecca of bodybuilding.”

58. Along with Agravain, Gareth, and Gaheris, this knight of the Round Table was King Arthur’s nephew by his sister Morgause and King Lot.

59. This actor completes a list that also includes Mahershala Ali, Walter Brennan, Michael Caine, Melvyn Douglas, Anthony Quinn, Jason Robards, and Peter Ustinov.

60. This former Atlanta mayor currently serves as director of the White House Office of Public Engagement.

61. This Scottish-born singer became the leading soprano at the Opera Comique in Paris, where she originated roles in works by Debussy and Massenet.

62. Author of more than 140 novels since 1973, she is currently the world’s best-selling living writer.

63. During the Open Era, he was the youngest player to achieve a career Grand Slam and the first to achieve the Surface Slam.

64. In 1931, this gynecologist was the only Roman Catholic doctor to sign a petition to legalize birth control; two decades later, he oversaw a critical milestone in its development.

65. A year after Svetlana Savitskaya became the second woman to do something, this woman became the third.

66. This social reformer was the first American woman to win the Nobel Peace Prize.

67. This English antiquarian won renown for his 1674 history of Oxford University.

68. There is strong evidence that this fashion designer collaborated with – and may even have acted as an agent for – the Nazis, but was shielded from postwar prosecution by Winston Churchill himself.

69. JMMQ: This choreographer’s best-known work, Le Jeune Homme et la Mort, told the story of a young man driven to suicide by his unfaithful lover.

70. This cartoonist created the first comic strip in which the characters aged with the years.

71. He was the only actor to win both the Oscar and the Tony twice.

72. In the 1930s, this blues musician was discovered by folklorist John Lomax in a Louisiana prison.

73. In January 2017, this prime minister became the first foreign leader to meet with newly inaugurated President Donald Trump.

74. This physicist made his seminal discovery in 1895 while conducting experiments with cathode tubes.

75. The first nine mystery novels published under this pseudonym each contained a national or geographic designation (Roman, Dutch, Chinese, etc.) in its title.

76. After this driver’s 2013 suicide, the chairman of NASCAR released a statement eulogizing him as “a legend in the short track racing community, particularly in his home state of Wisconsin.”

77. In 1848, he suddenly found himself the most famous sawmill owner in America.

78. As proprietor of the Emporia Gazette, this journalist became a leading figure of the Progressive movement and spokesman for Middle America.

79. As a master thief-taker, he was responsible for the arrest and hanging of highwayman Jack Sheppard; as a master criminal, he was eventually hanged himself.

80. In 2020, his statue in the U.S. Capitol was replaced by one of civil rights activist Barbara Rose Johns.

81. At the age of nine, he worked twelve hours a day as a crow scarer … later became a key figure in the unionization of British agricultural workers … and eventually wound up in Parliament.

82. The last active player from the NHL’s inaugural season, this Hall-of-Famer won three Stanley Cups with the Toronto St. Pat’s and the Montreal Maroons.

83. In 1896, this French filmmaker became the first woman to direct a movie.

84. Until the advent of Bruce Wayne, the most notable use of a particular costume was in this composer’s most popular operetta.

85. This chemist for 3M is credited with inventing the adhesive that made Post-It Notes possible.

86. He was only 22 when he won both the American League MVP and the Cy Young Award.

87. Many works of this French writer – who ultimately died in a wartime plane crash –were informed by his experiences as a pioneering aviator

88. Nominated by President James Madison at the age of 32, he remains the youngest Justice ever to serve on the Supreme Court.

89. Don Hewett wrote that this broadcasting pioneer “erected two towers of power: one for entertainment and one for news… [He] was the guy who put Frank Sinatra and Edward R. Murrow on the radio.”

90. On January 8, 1972, her “Problem” broke a major television taboo.

91. This singer amassed an impressive series of hits along with her brother Bubba and her cousins William and Edward.

92. This Russian-American sculptor first gained widespread attention in the 1940s when she exhibited a found shoeshine box at the Museum of Modern Art.

93. This American psychologist is known for his contributions to aptitude testing and his development of drive theory, an attempt to systematically analyze human drives.

94. This novelist famously described her writing as a “little bit (two inches wide) of Ivory on which I work with so fine a Brush.”

95. Though his reputation rests primarily on horror, he directed films in many genres – including what many consider the definitive screen version of a great American musical.

96. A magistrate who tried this religious leader for blasphemy in 1650 gave his followers what was intended to be a mocking soubriquet.

97. In an 1869 essay, this philosopher stated that the “legal subordination of one sex to another is wrong in itself, and now one of the chief hindrances to human improvement.”

98. On a trip to Santa Fe in 1944, his daughter expressed impatience to see a picture he had just take of her; the rest is history.

99. This President famously commented that he could run the country or he could control his daughter, but he couldn’t do both.

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Re: Game #208: A Listless Game

#2 Post by mikehardware » Tue Sep 20, 2022 9:37 am

91. This singer amassed an impressive series of hits along with her brother Bubba and her cousins William and Edward.
Gladys Knight

I finally got one!

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Re: Game #208: A Listless Game

#3 Post by mrkelley23 » Tue Sep 20, 2022 9:50 am

Just the ones I can do quickly, for now
franktangredi wrote:
Tue Sep 20, 2022 8:22 am
Anyone caught trying to inject political commentary into this game will be shot on sight.

Game #208: A Listless Game

Identify the 99 people in the clues below and match them into 33 trios according to a Tangredi, or principle you must discover for yourself. No names will be used twice.

Alternate solutions are likely, but only one combination will use all the names.

2. Even members of Congress from the segregated South voted in favor of funding a national monument to this man – the first such monument honoring an African American.

Crispus Attucks?

3. He is the only player to be named both MVP and Coach of the Year by the NBA

Larry Bird?

5. After jumping ship in 1842, he lived for a time among the people of the Marquesas Islands – an adventure which provided the material for his first two books and gained him the reputation as the "man who lived among the cannibals.”.

Daniel Defoe???

6. A highly uncharacteristic rock ballad on his group’s final album was written in memory of his five-year-old son, who had died the year before.

I would be tempted to say Eric Clapton, but I'm pretty sure he released Tears in Heaven as a solo act.

11. He took over Thomas Gage’s command in 1775; things didn’t go well after that.

WILLIAM HOWE


16. This beloved Danish writer was not so beloved by Charles Dickens, who reportedly modeled the character of Uriah Heep on him.

Hans Christian Anderson?


18. The career of this jazz trumpeter took off in the late 1950s when he began playing with Ornette Coleman; three decades later, his son and stepdaughter made their own appearances on the pop charts.

I think this must be someone named Cherry, as in Neneh and Eagle-Eye. But I don't know their dad's name.

26. A classic Honeymooners episode about Ralph’s efforts to find the perfect gift for Alice was one of many works to borrow the basic premise of this author’s most famous work.

O. Henry?


31. This economist is best remembered for something he reportedly sketched on a cocktail napkin during a 1974 meeting with Dick Cheney and Donald Rumsfeld.

LAFFER

32. In addition to launching the “It’s Get Better” campaign, this columnist and activist was responsible for Rick Santorum’s “Google problem.”

DAN SAVAGE


36. After his lithography business failed in 1860, this businessman found a new way to succeed at the game of life.

MILTON BRADLEY

38. Though this singer charted five number one and 18 top-ten singles on the Billboard country charts, her only crossover hit was a 1970 hit that went to #3 on the pop chart.

Donna Fargo? Jeannie C. Riley?

39. In addition to describing the genetic condition that now bears his name, this British physician was a pioneer in improving the treatment of the mentally disabled.

DOWN

42. The high point of this pitcher’s nine-year career with the Pirates was a no-hitter against the Mets in 1969; the low point was a wild pitch in 1972 that sent the Reds into the World Series.

Dock Ellis?


50. In a career spanning 48 years, this lyricist put words to the music of – among others – Jerome Kern, Sigmund Romberg, Jimmy McHugh, Arthur Schwartz, and Cy Coleman.

Dorothy Fields? She did Sweet Charity with Coleman, don't know about the others.

57. The business he founded in Venice, California in 1965 came to be known as “the Mecca of bodybuilding.”

Gold?


70. This cartoonist created the first comic strip in which the characters aged with the years.

The strip is Gasoline Alley. Don't remember the artist.

74. This physicist made his seminal discovery in 1895 while conducting experiments with cathode tubes.

Probably J. J. THOMSON

77. In 1848, he suddenly found himself the most famous sawmill owner in America.

SUTTER


84. Until the advent of Bruce Wayne, the most notable use of a particular costume was in this composer’s most popular operetta.

JOHANN STRAUSS


86. He was only 22 when he won both the American League MVP and the Cy Young Award.

Vida Blue?

90. On January 8, 1972, her “Problem” broke a major television taboo.

EDITH BUNKER


98. On a trip to Santa Fe in 1944, his daughter expressed impatience to see a picture he had just take of her; the rest is history.

Edwin Land?

99. This President famously commented that he could run the country or he could control his daughter, but he couldn’t do both.

I think it's TEDDY ROOSEVELT
For a successful technology, reality must take precedence over public relations, for Nature cannot be fooled. -- Richard Feynman

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Re: Game #208: A Listless Game

#4 Post by earendel » Tue Sep 20, 2022 10:45 am

1. Though not generally known for his writings on social etiquette, he did offer this useful clarification: "A revolution is not a dinner party."
MAO ZEDONG

2. Even members of Congress from the segregated South voted in favor of funding a national monument to this man – the first such monument honoring an African American.
GEORGE WASHINGTON CARVER

5. After jumping ship in 1842, he lived for a time among the people of the Marquesas Islands – an adventure which provided the material for his first two books and gained him the reputation as the "man who lived among the cannibals.”.
HERMAN MELVILLE

14. This English physicist shared the Nobel Prize in Medicine for his work in developing magnetic resonance imaging.
SIR PETER MANSFIELD

16. This beloved Danish writer was not so beloved by Charles Dickens, who reportedly modeled the character of Uriah Heep on him.
HANS CHRISTIAN ANDERSEN

20. In a 1900 obituary, the New York Times called this proponent of Reform Judaism “the foremost rabbi in America.”
ISAAC MAYER WISE

24. In 1918, he sent an infamous telegram in which he recommended the public hanging of “no fewer than one hundred known kulaks, fat cats, and bloodsuckers.”
VLADIMIR LENIN

25. This American shared the Nobel Prize in Chemistry for his discoveries regarding ubiquitin-mediated protein degradation. (No, I haven’t any idea what that means.)
IRWIN ROSE

26. A classic Honeymooners episode about Ralph’s efforts to find the perfect gift for Alice was one of many works to borrow the basic premise of this author’s most famous work.
O. HENRY

31. This economist is best remembered for something he reportedly sketched on a cocktail napkin during a 1974 meeting with Dick Cheney and Donald Rumsfeld.
ARTHUR LAFFER

34. Son of a wealthy Kentucky slaveholding family, he converted to abolitionism while a student at Yale after hearing William Lloyd Garrison speak; he was later appointed ambassador to Russia by Abraham Lincoln and helped win the tsar’s support for the Union cause.
CASSIUS CLAY

36. After his lithography business failed in 1860, this businessman found a new way to succeed at the game of life.
MILTON BRADLEY


45. This English idealist philosopher’s two most important works, the Prolegomena to Ethics and the Lectures on the Principles of Political Obligation, were not published until after his death.
THOMAS HILL GREEN

55. A biography written by this minister is arguably the foundational document of American hagiography.
JOHN FOXE

58. Along with Agravain, Gareth, and Gaheris, this knight of the Round Table was King Arthur’s nephew by his sister Morgause and King Lot.
SIR GAWAIN

65. A year after Svetlana Savitskaya became the second woman to do something, this woman became the third.
SALLY RIDE

74. This physicist made his seminal discovery in 1895 while conducting experiments with cathode tubes.
WILHELM ROENTGEN

77. In 1848, he suddenly found himself the most famous sawmill owner in America.
JOHN SUTTER

84. Until the advent of Bruce Wayne, the most notable use of a particular costume was in this composer’s most popular operetta.
JOHANN STRAUSS II

85. This chemist for 3M is credited with inventing the adhesive that made Post-It Notes possible.
ARTHUR FRY

88. Nominated by President James Madison at the age of 32, he remains the youngest Justice ever to serve on the Supreme Court.
JOSEPH STORY

89. Don Hewett wrote that this broadcasting pioneer “erected two towers of power: one for entertainment and one for news… [He] was the guy who put Frank Sinatra and Edward R. Murrow on the radio.”

90. On January 8, 1972, her “Problem” broke a major television taboo.

91. This singer amassed an impressive series of hits along with her brother Bubba and her cousins William and Edward.

92. This Russian-American sculptor first gained widespread attention in the 1940s when she exhibited a found shoeshine box at the Museum of Modern Art.

93. This American psychologist is known for his contributions to aptitude testing and his development of drive theory, an attempt to systematically analyze human drives.

94. This novelist famously described her writing as a “little bit (two inches wide) of Ivory on which I work with so fine a Brush.”

95. Though his reputation rests primarily on horror, he directed films in many genres – including what many consider the definitive screen version of a great American musical.

96. A magistrate who tried this religious leader for blasphemy in 1650 gave his followers what was intended to be a mocking soubriquet.
GEORGE FOX (QUAKERS)

98. On a trip to Santa Fe in 1944, his daughter expressed impatience to see a picture he had just take of her; the rest is history.
EDWIN LAND

99. This President famously commented that he could run the country or he could control his daughter, but he couldn’t do both.
THEODORE ROOSEVELT
"Elen sila lumenn omentielvo...A star shines on the hour of our meeting."

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Re: Game #208: A Listless Game

#5 Post by jarnon » Tue Sep 20, 2022 10:55 am

1. Though not generally known for his writings on social etiquette, he did offer this useful clarification: "A revolution is not a dinner party."
MAO ZEDONG

2. Even members of Congress from the segregated South voted in favor of funding a national monument to this man – the first such monument honoring an African American.
GEORGE WASHINGTON CARVER

16. This beloved Danish writer was not so beloved by Charles Dickens, who reportedly modeled the character of Uriah Heep on him.
HANS CHRISTIAN ANDERSEN

20. In a 1900 obituary, the New York Times called this proponent of Reform Judaism “the foremost rabbi in America.”
ISAAC MAYER WISE

24. In 1918, he sent an infamous telegram in which he recommended the public hanging of “no fewer than one hundred known kulaks, fat cats, and bloodsuckers.”
VLADIMIR LENIN

26. A classic Honeymooners episode about Ralph’s efforts to find the perfect gift for Alice was one of many works to borrow the basic premise of this author’s most famous work.
O HENRY

31. This economist is best remembered for something he reportedly sketched on a cocktail napkin during a 1974 meeting with Dick Cheney and Donald Rumsfeld.
ARTHUR LAFFER

39. In addition to describing the genetic condition that now bears his name, this British physician was a pioneer in improving the treatment of the mentally disabled.
JOHN DOWN

55. A biography written by this minister is arguably the foundational document of American hagiography.
MASON WEEMS

72. In the 1930s, this blues musician was discovered by folklorist John Lomax in a Louisiana prison.
LEADBELLY (I know this from a recent Bored RIP)

74. This physicist made his seminal discovery in 1895 while conducting experiments with cathode tubes.
WILHELM ROENTGEN

77. In 1848, he suddenly found himself the most famous sawmill owner in America.
JOHN SUTTER

85. This chemist for 3M is credited with inventing the adhesive that made Post-It Notes possible.
SPENCER SILVER (another Bored RIP)

87. Many works of this French writer – who ultimately died in a wartime plane crash –were informed by his experiences as a pioneering aviator
ANTOINE DE SAINT-EXUPERY

91. This singer amassed an impressive series of hits along with her brother Bubba and her cousins William and Edward.
GLADYS KNIGHT

98. On a trip to Santa Fe in 1944, his daughter expressed impatience to see a picture he had just take of her; the rest is history.
EDWIN LAND

99. This President famously commented that he could run the country or he could control his daughter, but he couldn’t do both.
THEODORE ROOSEVELT

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Re: Game #208: A Listless Game

#6 Post by Beebs52 » Tue Sep 20, 2022 11:14 am

franktangredi wrote:
Tue Sep 20, 2022 8:22 am
Anyone caught trying to inject political commentary into this game will be shot on sight.

Game #208: A Listless Game


Alternate solutions are likely, but only one combination will use all the names.

1. Though not generally known for his writings on social etiquette, he did offer this useful clarification: "A revolution is not a dinner party."
Benjamin Franklin?

2. Even members of Congress from the segregated South voted in favor of funding a national monument to this man – the first such monument honoring an African AmericanMartin Luther King

3. He is the only player to be named both MVP and Coach of the Year by the NBA

4. He won 21 Tony Awards for producing and/or directing works by Kern and Hammerstein, Bock and Harnick, Kander and Ebb, Adler and Ross, Stephen Sondheim, and Andrew Lloyd Weber.

5. After jumping ship in 1842, he lived for a time among the people of the Marquesas Islands – an adventure which provided the material for his first two books and gained him the reputation as the "man who lived among the cannibals.”.
Daniel Defoe

6. A highly uncharacteristic rock ballad on his group’s final album was written in memory of his five-year-old son, who had died the year before.
Eric Clapton

7. He admonished his fellow business leaders that “the man who dies leaving behind him many millions of available wealth which was his to administer during life will pass away ‘unwept, unhonored, and unsung,’ no matter to what uses he leaves the dross which he cannot take with him. Of such as these the public verdict will then be: ‘The man who dies thus rich dies disgraced.’”

8. This activist stirred considerable controversy when he commented that the assassination of John F Kennedy was a case of “chickens coming home to roost.” (But, then, almost everything he said stirred controversy.)

9. This artist is best known for two historical paintings depicting the deaths of British military heroes at the moment of their greatest triumphs.

10. JMMQ (Judy Murphy Memorial Question): A Prima Ballerina during her 20 years with the Royal Ballet, she left them in 2001 to serve as a Creative Director for the Royal Opera House.
Another JMMQ appears at #69.
Margot Fontaine

11. He took over Thomas Gage’s command in 1775; things didn’t go well after that.

12. This influential American sociologist did not coin the term “post-industrial society,” but in a 1973 book he correctly forecast that such a society would be information-led and service-oriented.
Marshall McLuhan

13. This physician completes a list that also includes Robert Morris, John Morton, George Clymer, James Smith, George Taylor, James Wilson, George Ross … and, of course, Benjamin Franklin.

14. This English physicist shared the Nobel Prize in Medicine for his work in developing magnetic resonance imaging.

15. In his nine seasons with the Denver Broncos, this Hall of Famer amassed a rushing total of 6,323 yards – at the time the 7th highest in the NFL.

16. This beloved Danish writer was not so beloved by Charles Dickens, who reportedly modeled the character of Uriah Heep on him.
Hans Christian Andersen

17. This actor’s last two completed film roles were adaptations of works by Ernest Hemingway and Agatha Christie.

18. The career of this jazz trumpeter took off in the late 1950s when he began playing with Ornette Coleman; three decades later, his son and stepdaughter made their own appearances on the pop charts.

19. She is the linchpin of a romantic quadrangle formed by her husband Charles and her lovers Rodolphe and Léon.

20. In a 1900 obituary, the New York Times called this proponent of Reform Judaism “the foremost rabbi in America.”

21. In addition to his influence on political thought, education, and the development of Romanticism, this philosopher was also an advocate of breastfeeding.

22. Though she was hanged only for the poisoning of her stepson, she is believed to have murdered three of her four husbands and eleven of her thirteen children for their insurance. (She died of slow strangulation rather than a quick neck break, due to a ‘mistake’ on the part of the hangman.)

23. Longtime president of the organization Consumer Watchdog, this activist is also the author of such books as The Progressive’s Guide to Raising Hell.

24. In 1918, he sent an infamous telegram in which he recommended the public hanging of “no fewer than one hundred known kulaks, fat cats, and bloodsuckers.”
Lenin

25. This American shared the Nobel Prize in Chemistry for his discoveries regarding ubiquitin-mediated protein degradation. (No, I haven’t any idea what that means.)

26. A classic Honeymooners episode about Ralph’s efforts to find the perfect gift for Alice was one of many works to borrow the basic premise of this author’s most famous work.
O Henry

27. In 1965, a radio station in New York aired a special version of the latest hit by a popular vocal group in which this lead singer held a single note for over a minute. (No, it wasn’t Ethel Merman.)

28. This American tennis player won 18 Grand Slam championships between 1936 and 1940.

29. This actor lost the role in Ghostbusters that eventually went to his colleague Rick Moranis, but at least he got to appear in the music video.

30. In a 1908 English novel, he became one of the earliest – and still one of the greatest – portraits of a car freak and reckless driver in literary history.

31. This economist is best remembered for something he reportedly sketched on a cocktail napkin during a 1974 meeting with Dick Cheney and Donald Rumsfeld.
Milton Friedman


32. In addition to launching the “It’s Get Better” campaign, this columnist and activist was responsible for Rick Santorum’s “Google problem.”

33. She was the first First Lady to visit Sesame Street.
Betty Ford

34. Son of a wealthy Kentucky slaveholding family, he converted to abolitionism while a student at Yale after hearing William Lloyd Garrison speak; he was later appointed ambassador to Russia by Abraham Lincoln and helped win the tsar’s support for the Union cause.

35. This French-American artist gained renown for her installations and monumental sculptures, especially a 30-feet high spider made of steel, bronze and marble.

36. After his lithography business failed in 1860, this businessman found a new way to succeed at the game of life.

37. In 1934, this American politician proposed a radical economic plan, the provisions of which included a cap on inheritances, incomes, and private fortunes; free higher education for all; a four-day work week with four weeks of paid vacation a year; and free medical service to all citizens.

38. Though this singer charted five number one and 18 top-ten singles on the Billboard country charts, her only crossover hit was a 1970 hit that went to #3 on the pop chart.

39. In addition to describing the genetic condition that now bears his name, this British physician was a pioneer in improving the treatment of the mentally disabled.
Downs

40. Though some critics find his lyricism ‘slow’ and others accuse him of glorifying poverty, he is still considered his country’s greatest filmmaker – placed by no less than Martin Scorsese on a par with his contemporaries Kurosawa, Bergman, and Fellini.

41. More than a century later, this poet and playwright remains the only Belgian to receive the Nobel Prize for Literature.

42. The high point of this pitcher’s nine-year career with the Pirates was a no-hitter against the Mets in 1969; the low point was a wild pitch in 1972 that sent the Reds into the World Series.

43. After a 1796 expedition down the Niger River, this explorer wrote a book theorizing that the Congo and the Niger eventually merged into a single river – a theory that was finally disproven until 1830.

44. He was the officer in charge of the defense of U.S. military installations in Hawaii on December 7, 1941. (The Senate absolved him of all responsibility … more than 50 years later.)

45. This English idealist philosopher’s two most important works, the Prolegomena to Ethics and the Lectures on the Principles of Political Obligation, were not published until after his death.

46. The best-known designs of this English architect include Buckingham Palace and the Royal Pavilion at Brighton.
Christopher Wren

47. The #MeToo movement brought renewed attention to this attorney and activist, who first emerged on the national stage more than two decades earlier.
Gloria Allred

48. This Houston-born diplomat was one of the most trusted advisors to the President of the United States, but after clashes at the Paris Peace Conference, the two never spoke again.

49. One of the great actor-managers of his day – and founder of the Royal Academy of Dramatic Arts – he was knighted in 1909 for his services to the British theatre.

50. In a career spanning 48 years, this lyricist put words to the music of – among others – Jerome Kern, Sigmund Romberg, Jimmy McHugh, Arthur Schwartz, and Cy Coleman.

51. At various times, his employees included Henry Ford, African American inventor Lewis Latimer, and film director Edwin S. Porter.

52. This English novelist is best known for a series of eleven novels published over a 30-year span and covering 43 years in the life of a civil servant named Lewis Eliot.

53. Winner of nine Triple Crown races, this jockey set a North American record in 1989 when he rode eight out of nine mounts to victory in a single day.
Eddie Arcaro

54. His rise to power was cemented by the murder of Paul Castellano.
Whitey Bulger

55. A biography written by this minister is arguably the foundational document of American hagiography.

56. This chef’s restaurant La Pyramide was considered the finest in France during his lifetime, but it eventually lost all three of its Michelin stars after his death.

57. The business he founded in Venice, California in 1965 came to be known as “the Mecca of bodybuilding.”
Gold

58. Along with Agravain, Gareth, and Gaheris, this knight of the Round Table was King Arthur’s nephew by his sister Morgause and King Lot.
Gawain

59. This actor completes a list that also includes Mahershala Ali, Walter Brennan, Michael Caine, Melvyn Douglas, Anthony Quinn, Jason Robards, and Peter Ustinov.

60. This former Atlanta mayor currently serves as director of the White House Office of Public Engagement.

61. This Scottish-born singer became the leading soprano at the Opera Comique in Paris, where she originated roles in works by Debussy and Massenet.

62. Author of more than 140 novels since 1973, she is currently the world’s best-selling living writer.
Barbara Cartland

63. During the Open Era, he was the youngest player to achieve a career Grand Slam and the first to achieve the Surface Slam.

64. In 1931, this gynecologist was the only Roman Catholic doctor to sign a petition to legalize birth control; two decades later, he oversaw a critical milestone in its development.

65. A year after Svetlana Savitskaya became the second woman to do something, this woman became the third.

66. This social reformer was the first American woman to win the Nobel Peace Prize.

67. This English antiquarian won renown for his 1674 history of Oxford University.

68. There is strong evidence that this fashion designer collaborated with – and may even have acted as an agent for – the Nazis, but was shielded from postwar prosecution by Winston Churchill himself.
Chanel

69. JMMQ: This choreographer’s best-known work, Le Jeune Homme et la Mort, told the story of a young man driven to suicide by his unfaithful lover.

70. This cartoonist created the first comic strip in which the characters aged with the years.

71. He was the only actor to win both the Oscar and the Tony twice.

72. In the 1930s, this blues musician was discovered by folklorist John Lomax in a Louisiana prison.

73. In January 2017, this prime minister became the first foreign leader to meet with newly inaugurated President Donald Trump.

74. This physicist made his seminal discovery in 1895 while conducting experiments with cathode tubes.

75. The first nine mystery novels published under this pseudonym each contained a national or geographic designation (Roman, Dutch, Chinese, etc.) in its title.

76. After this driver’s 2013 suicide, the chairman of NASCAR released a statement eulogizing him as “a legend in the short track racing community, particularly in his home state of Wisconsin.”

77. In 1848, he suddenly found himself the most famous sawmill owner in America.

78. As proprietor of the Emporia Gazette, this journalist became a leading figure of the Progressive movement and spokesman for Middle America.

79. As a master thief-taker, he was responsible for the arrest and hanging of highwayman Jack Sheppard; as a master criminal, he was eventually hanged himself.

80. In 2020, his statue in the U.S. Capitol was replaced by one of civil rights activist Barbara Rose Johns.

81. At the age of nine, he worked twelve hours a day as a crow scarer … later became a key figure in the unionization of British agricultural workers … and eventually wound up in Parliament.

82. The last active player from the NHL’s inaugural season, this Hall-of-Famer won three Stanley Cups with the Toronto St. Pat’s and the Montreal Maroons.

83. In 1896, this French filmmaker became the first woman to direct a movie.

84. Until the advent of Bruce Wayne, the most notable use of a particular costume was in this composer’s most popular operetta.

85. This chemist for 3M is credited with inventing the adhesive that made Post-It Notes possible.

86. He was only 22 when he won both the American League MVP and the Cy Young Award.

87. Many works of this French writer – who ultimately died in a wartime plane crash –were informed by his experiences as a pioneering aviator

88. Nominated by President James Madison at the age of 32, he remains the youngest Justice ever to serve on the Supreme Court.

89. Don Hewett wrote that this broadcasting pioneer “erected two towers of power: one for entertainment and one for news… [He] was the guy who put Frank Sinatra and Edward R. Murrow on the radio.”

90. On January 8, 1972, her “Problem” broke a major television taboo.

91. This singer amassed an impressive series of hits along with her brother Bubba and her cousins William and Edward.

92. This Russian-American sculptor first gained widespread attention in the 1940s when she exhibited a found shoeshine box at the Museum of Modern Art.

93. This American psychologist is known for his contributions to aptitude testing and his development of drive theory, an attempt to systematically analyze human drives.
Stanford Binet

94. This novelist famously described her writing as a “little bit (two inches wide) of Ivory on which I work with so fine a Brush.”

95. Though his reputation rests primarily on horror, he directed films in many genres – including what many consider the definitive screen version of a great American musical.

96. A magistrate who tried this religious leader for blasphemy in 1650 gave his followers what was intended to be a mocking soubriquet.

97. In an 1869 essay, this philosopher stated that the “legal subordination of one sex to another is wrong in itself, and now one of the chief hindrances to human improvement.”

98. On a trip to Santa Fe in 1944, his daughter expressed impatience to see a picture he had just take of her; the rest is history.

99. This President famously commented that he could run the country or he could control his daughter, but he couldn’t do both.
My head hurts. Must come back
Well, then

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Re: Game #208: A Listless Game

#7 Post by mellytu74 » Tue Sep 20, 2022 11:22 am

FIRST PASS - will come back in a while

Game #208: A Listless Game

Identify the 99 people in the clues below and match them into 33 trios according to a Tangredi, or principle you must discover for yourself. No names will be used twice.

Alternate solutions are likely, but only one combination will use all the names.

1. Though not generally known for his writings on social etiquette, he did offer this useful clarification: "A revolution is not a dinner party."

CHAIRMAN MAO

3. He is the only player to be named both MVP and Coach of the Year by the NBA

LARRY BIRD

4. He won 21 Tony Awards for producing and/or directing works by Kern and Hammerstein, Bock and Harnick, Kander and Ebb, Adler and Ross, Stephen Sondheim, and Andrew Lloyd Weber.

HAL PRINCE

5. After jumping ship in 1842, he lived for a time among the people of the Marquesas Islands – an adventure which provided the material for his first two books and gained him the reputation as the "man who lived among the cannibals.”.

HERMAN MELVILLE?

7. He admonished his fellow business leaders that “the man who dies leaving behind him many millions of available wealth which was his to administer during life will pass away ‘unwept, unhonored, and unsung,’ no matter to what uses he leaves the dross which he cannot take with him. Of such as these the public verdict will then be: ‘The man who dies thus rich dies disgraced.’”

pretty sure this is ANDREW CARNEGIE

13. This physician completes a list that also includes Robert Morris, John Morton, George Clymer, James Smith, George Taylor, James Wilson, George Ross … and, of course, Benjamin Franklin.

BENJAMIN RUSH (off topic, Benjamin Rush HS in Philadelphia was just named a Blue Ribbon HS - TLAF and I lived down the street from it for many years. :D)

16. This beloved Danish writer was not so beloved by Charles Dickens, who reportedly modeled the character of Uriah Heep on him.

HANS CHRISTIAN ANDERSEN

17. This actor’s last two completed film roles were adaptations of works by Ernest Hemingway and Agatha Christie.

TYRONE POWER

19. She is the linchpin of a romantic quadrangle formed by her husband Charles and her lovers Rodolphe and Léon.

EMMA BOVARY

23. Longtime president of the organization Consumer Watchdog, this activist is also the author of such books as The Progressive’s Guide to Raising Hell.

JAMIE COURT

26. A classic Honeymooners episode about Ralph’s efforts to find the perfect gift for Alice was one of many works to borrow the basic premise of this author’s most famous work.

O. HENRY

28. This American tennis player won 18 Grand Slam championships between 1936 and 1940.

ALICE MARBLE

32. In addition to launching the “It’s Get Better” campaign, this columnist and activist was responsible for Rick Santorum’s “Google problem.”

DAN SAVAGE

33. She was the first First Lady to visit Sesame Street.

BARBARA BUSH

36. After his lithography business failed in 1860, this businessman found a new way to succeed at the game of life.

MILTON BRADLEY?

42. The high point of this pitcher’s nine-year career with the Pirates was a no-hitter against the Mets in 1969; the low point was a wild pitch in 1972 that sent the Reds into the World Series.

BOB MOOSE

49. One of the great actor-managers of his day – and founder of the Royal Academy of Dramatic Arts – he was knighted in 1909 for his services to the British theatre.

HERBERT BEERBOHM TREE??

50. In a career spanning 48 years, this lyricist put words to the music of – among others – Jerome Kern, Sigmund Romberg, Jimmy McHugh, Arthur Schwartz, and Cy Coleman.

DOROTHY FIELDS

58. Along with Agravain, Gareth, and Gaheris, this knight of the Round Table was King Arthur’s nephew by his sister Morgause and King Lot.

GAWAIN?

60. This former Atlanta mayor currently serves as director of the White House Office of Public Engagement.

KEISHA LANCE BOTTOMS

64. In 1931, this gynecologist was the only Roman Catholic doctor to sign a petition to legalize birth control; two decades later, he oversaw a critical milestone in its development.

JOHN ROCK

66. This social reformer was the first American woman to win the Nobel Peace Prize.

JANE ADDAMS?

68. There is strong evidence that this fashion designer collaborated with – and may even have acted as an agent for – the Nazis, but was shielded from postwar prosecution by Winston Churchill himself.

COCO CHANEL

70. This cartoonist created the first comic strip in which the characters aged with the years.

Whoever did Gasoline Alley

71. He was the only actor to win both the Oscar and the Tony twice.

FREDRIC MARCH

77. In 1848, he suddenly found himself the most famous sawmill owner in America.

JOHN SUTTER

78. As proprietor of the Emporia Gazette, this journalist became a leading figure of the Progressive movement and spokesman for Middle America.

WILLIAM ALLEN WHITE


80. In 2020, his statue in the U.S. Capitol was replaced by one of civil rights activist Barbara Rose Johns.

ROBERT E LEE?

83. In 1896, this French filmmaker became the first woman to direct a movie.

ALICE GUY BLACHE?

89. Don Hewett wrote that this broadcasting pioneer “erected two towers of power: one for entertainment and one for news… [He] was the guy who put Frank Sinatra and Edward R. Murrow on the radio.”

WILLIAM S. PALEY

91. This singer amassed an impressive series of hits along with her brother Bubba and her cousins William and Edward.

GLADYS KNIGHT

95. Though his reputation rests primarily on horror, he directed films in many genres – including what many consider the definitive screen version of a great American musical.

JAMES WHALE

98. On a trip to Santa Fe in 1944, his daughter expressed impatience to see a picture he had just take of her; the rest is history.

EDWIN LAND?

99. This President famously commented that he could run the country or he could control his daughter, but he couldn’t do both.

THEODORE ROOSEVELT

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Re: Game #208: A Listless Game

#8 Post by Beebs52 » Tue Sep 20, 2022 2:03 pm

All with massive question marks

#9 Turner
#27 Frankie Valli
#43 Livingstone
#48 Charlie Wilson
#52 Wodehouse
#63 Ashe
#69 Ailey
#82 Orr
Well, then

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Re: Game #208: A Listless Game

#9 Post by silverscreenselect » Tue Sep 20, 2022 9:35 pm

franktangredi wrote:
Tue Sep 20, 2022 8:22 am
17. This actor’s last two completed film roles were adaptations of works by Ernest Hemingway and Agatha Christie.
TYRONE POWER

26. A classic Honeymooners episode about Ralph’s efforts to find the perfect gift for Alice was one of many works to borrow the basic premise of this author’s most famous work.
O HENRY

44. He was the officer in charge of the defense of U.S. military installations in Hawaii on December 7, 1941. (The Senate absolved him of all responsibility … more than 50 years later.)
HUSBAND KIMMEL

60. This former Atlanta mayor currently serves as director of the White House Office of Public Engagement.
KEISHA LANCE BOTTOMS

75. The first nine mystery novels published under this pseudonym each contained a national or geographic designation (Roman, Dutch, Chinese, etc.) in its title.
ELLERY QUEEN

77. In 1848, he suddenly found himself the most famous sawmill owner in America.
SUTTER

87. Many works of this French writer – who ultimately died in a wartime plane crash –were informed by his experiences as a pioneering aviator
ANTOINE de ST. EXUPERY

90. On January 8, 1972, her “Problem” broke a major television taboo.
BEA ARTHUR
Check out our website: http://www.silverscreenvideos.com

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Re: Game #208: A Listless Game

#10 Post by jarnon » Tue Sep 20, 2022 10:26 pm

Here's the first consolidation …

Identify the 99 people in the clues below and match them into 33 trios according to a Tangredi, or principle you must discover for yourself. No names will be used twice.

Alternate solutions are likely, but only one combination will use all the names.

1. Though not generally known for his writings on social etiquette, he did offer this useful clarification: "A revolution is not a dinner party."
MAO ZEDONG

2. Even members of Congress from the segregated South voted in favor of funding a national monument to this man – the first such monument honoring an African American.
GEORGE WASHINGTON CARVER

3. He is the only player to be named both MVP and Coach of the Year by the NBA
LARRY BIRD

4. He won 21 Tony Awards for producing and/or directing works by Kern and Hammerstein, Bock and Harnick, Kander and Ebb, Adler and Ross, Stephen Sondheim, and Andrew Lloyd Weber.
HAL PRINCE

5. After jumping ship in 1842, he lived for a time among the people of the Marquesas Islands – an adventure which provided the material for his first two books and gained him the reputation as the "man who lived among the cannibals.”
HERMAN MELVILLE

6. A highly uncharacteristic rock ballad on his group’s final album was written in memory of his five-year-old son, who had died the year before.
ERIC CLAPTON

7. He admonished his fellow business leaders that “the man who dies leaving behind him many millions of available wealth which was his to administer during life will pass away ‘unwept, unhonored, and unsung,’ no matter to what uses he leaves the dross which he cannot take with him. Of such as these the public verdict will then be: ‘The man who dies thus rich dies disgraced.’”
ANDREW CARNEGIE

8. This activist stirred considerable controversy when he commented that the assassination of John F Kennedy was a case of “chickens coming home to roost.” (But, then, almost everything he said stirred controversy.)

9. This artist is best known for two historical paintings depicting the deaths of British military heroes at the moment of their greatest triumphs.
TURNER?

10. JMMQ (Judy Murphy Memorial Question): A Prima Ballerina during her 20 years with the Royal Ballet, she left them in 2001 to serve as a Creative Director for the Royal Opera House.
Another JMMQ appears at #69.
MARGOT FONTAINE

11. He took over Thomas Gage’s command in 1775; things didn’t go well after that.
WILLIAM HOWE

12. This influential American sociologist did not coin the term “post-industrial society,” but in a 1973 book he correctly forecast that such a society would be information-led and service-oriented.
MARSHALL McLUHAN

13. This physician completes a list that also includes Robert Morris, John Morton, George Clymer, James Smith, George Taylor, James Wilson, George Ross … and, of course, Benjamin Franklin.
BENJAMIN RUSH

14. This English physicist shared the Nobel Prize in Medicine for his work in developing magnetic resonance imaging.
SIR PETER MANSFIELD

15. In his nine seasons with the Denver Broncos, this Hall of Famer amassed a rushing total of 6,323 yards – at the time the 7th highest in the NFL.

16. This beloved Danish writer was not so beloved by Charles Dickens, who reportedly modeled the character of Uriah Heep on him.
HANS CHRISTIAN ANDERSON

17. This actor’s last two completed film roles were adaptations of works by Ernest Hemingway and Agatha Christie.
TYRONE POWER

18. The career of this jazz trumpeter took off in the late 1950s when he began playing with Ornette Coleman; three decades later, his son and stepdaughter made their own appearances on the pop charts.

19. She is the linchpin of a romantic quadrangle formed by her husband Charles and her lovers Rodolphe and Léon.
EMMA BOVARY

20. In a 1900 obituary, the New York Times called this proponent of Reform Judaism “the foremost rabbi in America.”
ISAAC MAYER WISE

21. In addition to his influence on political thought, education, and the development of Romanticism, this philosopher was also an advocate of breastfeeding.

22. Though she was hanged only for the poisoning of her stepson, she is believed to have murdered three of her four husbands and eleven of her thirteen children for their insurance. (She died of slow strangulation rather than a quick neck break, due to a ‘mistake’ on the part of the hangman.)

23. Longtime president of the organization Consumer Watchdog, this activist is also the author of such books as The Progressive’s Guide to Raising Hell.
JAMIE COURT

24. In 1918, he sent an infamous telegram in which he recommended the public hanging of “no fewer than one hundred known kulaks, fat cats, and bloodsuckers.”
VLADIMIR LENIN

25. This American shared the Nobel Prize in Chemistry for his discoveries regarding ubiquitin-mediated protein degradation. (No, I haven’t any idea what that means.)
IRWIN ROSE

26. A classic Honeymooners episode about Ralph’s efforts to find the perfect gift for Alice was one of many works to borrow the basic premise of this author’s most famous work.
O. HENRY

27. In 1965, a radio station in New York aired a special version of the latest hit by a popular vocal group in which this lead singer held a single note for over a minute. (No, it wasn’t Ethel Merman.)
FRANKIE VALLI?

28. This American tennis player won 18 Grand Slam championships between 1936 and 1940.
ALICE MARBLE

29. This actor lost the role in Ghostbusters that eventually went to his colleague Rick Moranis, but at least he got to appear in the music video.

30. In a 1908 English novel, he became one of the earliest – and still one of the greatest – portraits of a car freak and reckless driver in literary history.

31. This economist is best remembered for something he reportedly sketched on a cocktail napkin during a 1974 meeting with Dick Cheney and Donald Rumsfeld.
ARTHUR LAFFER

32. In addition to launching the “It’s Get Better” campaign, this columnist and activist was responsible for Rick Santorum’s “Google problem.”
DAN SAVAGE

33. She was the first First Lady to visit Sesame Street.
BETTY FORD? BARBARA BUSH?

34. Son of a wealthy Kentucky slaveholding family, he converted to abolitionism while a student at Yale after hearing William Lloyd Garrison speak; he was later appointed ambassador to Russia by Abraham Lincoln and helped win the tsar’s support for the Union cause.
CASSIUS CLAY

35. This French-American artist gained renown for her installations and monumental sculptures, especially a 30-feet high spider made of steel, bronze and marble.

36. After his lithography business failed in 1860, this businessman found a new way to succeed at the game of life.
MILTON BRADLEY

37. In 1934, this American politician proposed a radical economic plan, the provisions of which included a cap on inheritances, incomes, and private fortunes; free higher education for all; a four-day work week with four weeks of paid vacation a year; and free medical service to all citizens.

38. Though this singer charted five number one and 18 top-ten singles on the Billboard country charts, her only crossover hit was a 1970 hit that went to #3 on the pop chart.
DONNA FARGO? JEANNIE C. RILEY?

39. In addition to describing the genetic condition that now bears his name, this British physician was a pioneer in improving the treatment of the mentally disabled.
JOHN LANGDON DOWN

40. Though some critics find his lyricism ‘slow’ and others accuse him of glorifying poverty, he is still considered his country’s greatest filmmaker – placed by no less than Martin Scorsese on a par with his contemporaries Kurosawa, Bergman, and Fellini.

41. More than a century later, this poet and playwright remains the only Belgian to receive the Nobel Prize for Literature.

42. The high point of this pitcher’s nine-year career with the Pirates was a no-hitter against the Mets in 1969; the low point was a wild pitch in 1972 that sent the Reds into the World Series.
BOB MOOSE

43. After a 1796 expedition down the Niger River, this explorer wrote a book theorizing that the Congo and the Niger eventually merged into a single river – a theory that was finally disproven until 1830.
DAVID LIVINGSTONE?

44. He was the officer in charge of the defense of U.S. military installations in Hawaii on December 7, 1941. (The Senate absolved him of all responsibility … more than 50 years later.)
HUSBAND KIMMEL

45. This English idealist philosopher’s two most important works, the Prolegomena to Ethics and the Lectures on the Principles of Political Obligation, were not published until after his death.
THOMAS HILL GREEN

46. The best-known designs of this English architect include Buckingham Palace and the Royal Pavilion at Brighton.
CHRISTOPHER WREN

47. The #MeToo movement brought renewed attention to this attorney and activist, who first emerged on the national stage more than two decades earlier.
GLORIA ALLRED

48. This Houston-born diplomat was one of the most trusted advisors to the President of the United States, but after clashes at the Paris Peace Conference, the two never spoke again.
CHARLIE WILSON?

49. One of the great actor-managers of his day – and founder of the Royal Academy of Dramatic Arts – he was knighted in 1909 for his services to the British theatre.
HERBERT BEERBOHM TREE?

50. In a career spanning 48 years, this lyricist put words to the music of – among others – Jerome Kern, Sigmund Romberg, Jimmy McHugh, Arthur Schwartz, and Cy Coleman.
DOROTHY FIELDS

51. At various times, his employees included Henry Ford, African American inventor Lewis Latimer, and film director Edwin S. Porter.

52. This English novelist is best known for a series of eleven novels published over a 30-year span and covering 43 years in the life of a civil servant named Lewis Eliot.
P.G. WODEHOUSE?

53. Winner of nine Triple Crown races, this jockey set a North American record in 1989 when he rode eight out of nine mounts to victory in a single day.
EDDIE ARCARO

54. His rise to power was cemented by the murder of Paul Castellano.
WHITEY BULGER

55. A biography written by this minister is arguably the foundational document of American hagiography.
MASON LOCKE WEEMS

56. This chef’s restaurant La Pyramide was considered the finest in France during his lifetime, but it eventually lost all three of its Michelin stars after his death.

57. The business he founded in Venice, California in 1965 came to be known as “the Mecca of bodybuilding.”
JOE GOLD

58. Along with Agravain, Gareth, and Gaheris, this knight of the Round Table was King Arthur’s nephew by his sister Morgause and King Lot.
SIR GAWAIN

59. This actor completes a list that also includes Mahershala Ali, Walter Brennan, Michael Caine, Melvyn Douglas, Anthony Quinn, Jason Robards, and Peter Ustinov.

60. This former Atlanta mayor currently serves as director of the White House Office of Public Engagement.
KEISHA LANCE BOTTOMS

61. This Scottish-born singer became the leading soprano at the Opera Comique in Paris, where she originated roles in works by Debussy and Massenet.

62. Author of more than 140 novels since 1973, she is currently the world’s best-selling living writer.
BARBARA CARTLAND

63. During the Open Era, he was the youngest player to achieve a career Grand Slam and the first to achieve the Surface Slam.
ARTHUR ASHE?

64. In 1931, this gynecologist was the only Roman Catholic doctor to sign a petition to legalize birth control; two decades later, he oversaw a critical milestone in its development.
JOHN ROCK

65. A year after Svetlana Savitskaya became the second woman to do something, this woman became the third.
SALLY RIDE

66. This social reformer was the first American woman to win the Nobel Peace Prize.
JANE ADDAMS?

67. This English antiquarian won renown for his 1674 history of Oxford University.

68. There is strong evidence that this fashion designer collaborated with – and may even have acted as an agent for – the Nazis, but was shielded from postwar prosecution by Winston Churchill himself.
COCO CHANEL

69. JMMQ: This choreographer’s best-known work, Le Jeune Homme et la Mort, told the story of a young man driven to suicide by his unfaithful lover.
ALVIN AILEY?

70. This cartoonist created the first comic strip in which the characters aged with the years.
(The strip is Gasoline Alley.)

71. He was the only actor to win both the Oscar and the Tony twice.
FREDRIC MARCH

72. In the 1930s, this blues musician was discovered by folklorist John Lomax in a Louisiana prison.
LEADBELLY

73. In January 2017, this prime minister became the first foreign leader to meet with newly inaugurated President Donald Trump.

74. This physicist made his seminal discovery in 1895 while conducting experiments with cathode tubes.
WILHELM ROENTGEN

75. The first nine mystery novels published under this pseudonym each contained a national or geographic designation (Roman, Dutch, Chinese, etc.) in its title.
ELLERY QUEEN

76. After this driver’s 2013 suicide, the chairman of NASCAR released a statement eulogizing him as “a legend in the short track racing community, particularly in his home state of Wisconsin.”

77. In 1848, he suddenly found himself the most famous sawmill owner in America.
JOHN SUTTER

78. As proprietor of the Emporia Gazette, this journalist became a leading figure of the Progressive movement and spokesman for Middle America.
WILLIAM ALLEN WHITE

79. As a master thief-taker, he was responsible for the arrest and hanging of highwayman Jack Sheppard; as a master criminal, he was eventually hanged himself.

80. In 2020, his statue in the U.S. Capitol was replaced by one of civil rights activist Barbara Rose Johns.
ROBERT E. LEE?

81. At the age of nine, he worked twelve hours a day as a crow scarer … later became a key figure in the unionization of British agricultural workers … and eventually wound up in Parliament.

82. The last active player from the NHL’s inaugural season, this Hall-of-Famer won three Stanley Cups with the Toronto St. Pat’s and the Montreal Maroons.
BOBBY ORR?

83. In 1896, this French filmmaker became the first woman to direct a movie.
ALICE GUY BLACHE?

84. Until the advent of Bruce Wayne, the most notable use of a particular costume was in this composer’s most popular operetta.
JOHANN STRAUSS II

85. This chemist for 3M is credited with inventing the adhesive that made Post-It Notes possible.
SPENCER SILVER

86. He was only 22 when he won both the American League MVP and the Cy Young Award.
VIDA BLUE?

87. Many works of this French writer – who ultimately died in a wartime plane crash –were informed by his experiences as a pioneering aviator
ANTOINE DE SAINT-EXUPERY

88. Nominated by President James Madison at the age of 32, he remains the youngest Justice ever to serve on the Supreme Court.
JOSEPH STORY

89. Don Hewett wrote that this broadcasting pioneer “erected two towers of power: one for entertainment and one for news… [He] was the guy who put Frank Sinatra and Edward R. Murrow on the radio.”
WILLIAM S. PALEY

90. On January 8, 1972, her “Problem” broke a major television taboo.
EDITH BUNKER? BEA ARTHUR?

91. This singer amassed an impressive series of hits along with her brother Bubba and her cousins William and Edward.
GLADYS KNIGHT

92. This Russian-American sculptor first gained widespread attention in the 1940s when she exhibited a found shoeshine box at the Museum of Modern Art.

93. This American psychologist is known for his contributions to aptitude testing and his development of drive theory, an attempt to systematically analyze human drives.
STANFORD BINET

94. This novelist famously described her writing as a “little bit (two inches wide) of Ivory on which I work with so fine a Brush.”

95. Though his reputation rests primarily on horror, he directed films in many genres – including what many consider the definitive screen version of a great American musical.
JAMES WHALE

96. A magistrate who tried this religious leader for blasphemy in 1650 gave his followers what was intended to be a mocking soubriquet.
GEORGE FOX (Quakers)

97. In an 1869 essay, this philosopher stated that the “legal subordination of one sex to another is wrong in itself, and now one of the chief hindrances to human improvement.”

98. On a trip to Santa Fe in 1944, his daughter expressed impatience to see a picture he had just take of her; the rest is history.
EDWIN LAND

99. This President famously commented that he could run the country or he could control his daughter, but he couldn’t do both.
THEODORE ROOSEVELT
Last edited by jarnon on Tue Sep 20, 2022 10:31 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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Re: Game #208: A Listless Game

#11 Post by jarnon » Tue Sep 20, 2022 10:30 pm

51. At various times, his employees included Henry Ford, African American inventor Lewis Latimer, and film director Edwin S. Porter.
THOMAS EDISON

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Re: Game #208: A Listless Game

#12 Post by Weyoun » Wed Sep 21, 2022 7:15 am

6. A highly uncharacteristic rock ballad on his group’s final album was written in memory of his five-year-old son, who had died the year before.
I believe this is All of My Love by Led Zeppelin, about ROBERT PLANT's son

8. This activist stirred considerable controversy when he commented that the assassination of John F Kennedy was a case of “chickens coming home to roost.” (But, then, almost everything he said stirred controversy.)
MALCOLM X

9. This artist is best known for two historical paintings depicting the deaths of British military heroes at the moment of their greatest triumphs.
BENJAMIN WEST - deaths of Wolfe and Nelson

12. This influential American sociologist did not coin the term “post-industrial society,” but in a 1973 book he correctly forecast that such a society would be information-led and service-oriented.
McLUHAN is Canadian. I would toss out there ROBERT K MERTON or DANIEL BELL

15. In his nine seasons with the Denver Broncos, this Hall of Famer amassed a rushing total of 6,323 yards – at the time the 7th highest in the NFL.
Someone from way back, 60s or 70s

18. The career of this jazz trumpeter took off in the late 1950s when he began playing with Ornette Coleman; three decades later, his son and stepdaughter made their own appearances on the pop charts.
DON CHERRY - think of Eagle Eye and Nenah


30. In a 1908 English novel, he became one of the earliest – and still one of the greatest – portraits of a car freak and reckless driver in literary history.
The toad from Wind in the Willows?

35. This French-American artist gained renown for her installations and monumental sculptures, especially a 30-feet high spider made of steel, bronze and marble.
LOUIS BORGEOIS

37. In 1934, this American politician proposed a radical economic plan, the provisions of which included a cap on inheritances, incomes, and private fortunes; free higher education for all; a four-day work week with four weeks of paid vacation a year; and free medical service to all citizens.
HUEY LONG?

38. Though this singer charted five number one and 18 top-ten singles on the Billboard country charts, her only crossover hit was a 1970 hit that went to #3 on the pop chart.
DONNA FARGO? JEANNIE C. RILEY?

40. Though some critics find his lyricism ‘slow’ and others accuse him of glorifying poverty, he is still considered his country’s greatest filmmaker – placed by no less than Martin Scorsese on a par with his contemporaries Kurosawa, Bergman, and Fellini.
SATJIYAT RAY?

41. More than a century later, this poet and playwright remains the only Belgian to receive the Nobel Prize for Literature.
MAURICE MAETERLINCK

43. After a 1796 expedition down the Niger River, this explorer wrote a book theorizing that the Congo and the Niger eventually merged into a single river – a theory that was finally disproven until 1830.
MUNGO PARK

48. This Houston-born diplomat was one of the most trusted advisors to the President of the United States, but after clashes at the Paris Peace Conference, the two never spoke again.
Colonel HOUSE

52. This English novelist is best known for a series of eleven novels published over a 30-year span and covering 43 years in the life of a civil servant named Lewis Eliot.
CP SNOW

59. This actor completes a list that also includes Mahershala Ali, Walter Brennan, Michael Caine, Melvyn Douglas, Anthony Quinn, Jason Robards, and Peter Ustinov.
CHRISTOPH WALTZ

62. Author of more than 140 novels since 1973, she is currently the world’s best-selling living writer.
CARTLAND is dead. DANIELLE STEEL?

63. During the Open Era, he was the youngest player to achieve a career Grand Slam and the first to achieve the Surface Slam.
ROD LAVER?

69. JMMQ: This choreographer’s best-known work, Le Jeune Homme et la Mort, told the story of a young man driven to suicide by his unfaithful lover.
ALVIN AILEY? Doesn't sound like him. I will throw out AUGUST BOURNONVILLE

76. After this driver’s 2013 suicide, the chairman of NASCAR released a statement eulogizing him as “a legend in the short track racing community, particularly in his home state of Wisconsin.”
DICK TRICKLE

82. The last active player from the NHL’s inaugural season, this Hall-of-Famer won three Stanley Cups with the Toronto St. Pat’s and the Montreal Maroons.
BOBBY ORR? Way way too early for him

83. In 1896, this French filmmaker became the first woman to direct a movie.
ALICE GUY BLACHE? I think so


90. On January 8, 1972, her “Problem” broke a major television taboo.
EDITH BUNKER? BEA ARTHUR? I think this is the menopause episode

92. This Russian-American sculptor first gained widespread attention in the 1940s when she exhibited a found shoeshine box at the Museum of Modern Art.
LOUISE NEVELSON?

97. In an 1869 essay, this philosopher stated that the “legal subordination of one sex to another is wrong in itself, and now one of the chief hindrances to human improvement.”
JOHN STUART MILL

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Re: Game #208: A Listless Game

#13 Post by franktangredi » Wed Sep 21, 2022 7:16 am

There are 10 wrong 'definite' answers on this ... or, at least, not the answer I was looking for.

Of those with question marks, 5 are right and 8 are wrong.

Of those with two alternates, 2 include the right answer and 1 does not.
jarnon wrote:
Tue Sep 20, 2022 10:26 pm
Here's the first consolidation …

Identify the 99 people in the clues below and match them into 33 trios according to a Tangredi, or principle you must discover for yourself. No names will be used twice.

Alternate solutions are likely, but only one combination will use all the names.

1. Though not generally known for his writings on social etiquette, he did offer this useful clarification: "A revolution is not a dinner party."
MAO ZEDONG

2. Even members of Congress from the segregated South voted in favor of funding a national monument to this man – the first such monument honoring an African American.
GEORGE WASHINGTON CARVER

3. He is the only player to be named both MVP and Coach of the Year by the NBA
LARRY BIRD

4. He won 21 Tony Awards for producing and/or directing works by Kern and Hammerstein, Bock and Harnick, Kander and Ebb, Adler and Ross, Stephen Sondheim, and Andrew Lloyd Weber.
HAL PRINCE

5. After jumping ship in 1842, he lived for a time among the people of the Marquesas Islands – an adventure which provided the material for his first two books and gained him the reputation as the "man who lived among the cannibals.”
HERMAN MELVILLE

6. A highly uncharacteristic rock ballad on his group’s final album was written in memory of his five-year-old son, who had died the year before.
ERIC CLAPTON

7. He admonished his fellow business leaders that “the man who dies leaving behind him many millions of available wealth which was his to administer during life will pass away ‘unwept, unhonored, and unsung,’ no matter to what uses he leaves the dross which he cannot take with him. Of such as these the public verdict will then be: ‘The man who dies thus rich dies disgraced.’”
ANDREW CARNEGIE

8. This activist stirred considerable controversy when he commented that the assassination of John F Kennedy was a case of “chickens coming home to roost.” (But, then, almost everything he said stirred controversy.)

9. This artist is best known for two historical paintings depicting the deaths of British military heroes at the moment of their greatest triumphs.
TURNER?

10. JMMQ (Judy Murphy Memorial Question): A Prima Ballerina during her 20 years with the Royal Ballet, she left them in 2001 to serve as a Creative Director for the Royal Opera House.
Another JMMQ appears at #69.
MARGOT FONTAINE

11. He took over Thomas Gage’s command in 1775; things didn’t go well after that.
WILLIAM HOWE

12. This influential American sociologist did not coin the term “post-industrial society,” but in a 1973 book he correctly forecast that such a society would be information-led and service-oriented.
MARSHALL McLUHAN

13. This physician completes a list that also includes Robert Morris, John Morton, George Clymer, James Smith, George Taylor, James Wilson, George Ross … and, of course, Benjamin Franklin.
BENJAMIN RUSH

14. This English physicist shared the Nobel Prize in Medicine for his work in developing magnetic resonance imaging.
SIR PETER MANSFIELD

15. In his nine seasons with the Denver Broncos, this Hall of Famer amassed a rushing total of 6,323 yards – at the time the 7th highest in the NFL.

16. This beloved Danish writer was not so beloved by Charles Dickens, who reportedly modeled the character of Uriah Heep on him.
HANS CHRISTIAN ANDERSON

17. This actor’s last two completed film roles were adaptations of works by Ernest Hemingway and Agatha Christie.
TYRONE POWER

18. The career of this jazz trumpeter took off in the late 1950s when he began playing with Ornette Coleman; three decades later, his son and stepdaughter made their own appearances on the pop charts.

19. She is the linchpin of a romantic quadrangle formed by her husband Charles and her lovers Rodolphe and Léon.
EMMA BOVARY

20. In a 1900 obituary, the New York Times called this proponent of Reform Judaism “the foremost rabbi in America.”
ISAAC MAYER WISE

21. In addition to his influence on political thought, education, and the development of Romanticism, this philosopher was also an advocate of breastfeeding.

22. Though she was hanged only for the poisoning of her stepson, she is believed to have murdered three of her four husbands and eleven of her thirteen children for their insurance. (She died of slow strangulation rather than a quick neck break, due to a ‘mistake’ on the part of the hangman.)

23. Longtime president of the organization Consumer Watchdog, this activist is also the author of such books as The Progressive’s Guide to Raising Hell.
JAMIE COURT

24. In 1918, he sent an infamous telegram in which he recommended the public hanging of “no fewer than one hundred known kulaks, fat cats, and bloodsuckers.”
VLADIMIR LENIN

25. This American shared the Nobel Prize in Chemistry for his discoveries regarding ubiquitin-mediated protein degradation. (No, I haven’t any idea what that means.)
IRWIN ROSE

26. A classic Honeymooners episode about Ralph’s efforts to find the perfect gift for Alice was one of many works to borrow the basic premise of this author’s most famous work.
O. HENRY

27. In 1965, a radio station in New York aired a special version of the latest hit by a popular vocal group in which this lead singer held a single note for over a minute. (No, it wasn’t Ethel Merman.)
FRANKIE VALLI?

28. This American tennis player won 18 Grand Slam championships between 1936 and 1940.
ALICE MARBLE

29. This actor lost the role in Ghostbusters that eventually went to his colleague Rick Moranis, but at least he got to appear in the music video.

30. In a 1908 English novel, he became one of the earliest – and still one of the greatest – portraits of a car freak and reckless driver in literary history.

31. This economist is best remembered for something he reportedly sketched on a cocktail napkin during a 1974 meeting with Dick Cheney and Donald Rumsfeld.
ARTHUR LAFFER

32. In addition to launching the “It’s Get Better” campaign, this columnist and activist was responsible for Rick Santorum’s “Google problem.”
DAN SAVAGE

33. She was the first First Lady to visit Sesame Street.
BETTY FORD? BARBARA BUSH?

34. Son of a wealthy Kentucky slaveholding family, he converted to abolitionism while a student at Yale after hearing William Lloyd Garrison speak; he was later appointed ambassador to Russia by Abraham Lincoln and helped win the tsar’s support for the Union cause.
CASSIUS CLAY

35. This French-American artist gained renown for her installations and monumental sculptures, especially a 30-feet high spider made of steel, bronze and marble.

36. After his lithography business failed in 1860, this businessman found a new way to succeed at the game of life.
MILTON BRADLEY

37. In 1934, this American politician proposed a radical economic plan, the provisions of which included a cap on inheritances, incomes, and private fortunes; free higher education for all; a four-day work week with four weeks of paid vacation a year; and free medical service to all citizens.

38. Though this singer charted five number one and 18 top-ten singles on the Billboard country charts, her only crossover hit was a 1970 hit that went to #3 on the pop chart.
DONNA FARGO? JEANNIE C. RILEY?

39. In addition to describing the genetic condition that now bears his name, this British physician was a pioneer in improving the treatment of the mentally disabled.
JOHN LANGDON DOWN

40. Though some critics find his lyricism ‘slow’ and others accuse him of glorifying poverty, he is still considered his country’s greatest filmmaker – placed by no less than Martin Scorsese on a par with his contemporaries Kurosawa, Bergman, and Fellini.

41. More than a century later, this poet and playwright remains the only Belgian to receive the Nobel Prize for Literature.

42. The high point of this pitcher’s nine-year career with the Pirates was a no-hitter against the Mets in 1969; the low point was a wild pitch in 1972 that sent the Reds into the World Series.
BOB MOOSE

43. After a 1796 expedition down the Niger River, this explorer wrote a book theorizing that the Congo and the Niger eventually merged into a single river – a theory that was finally disproven until 1830.
DAVID LIVINGSTONE?

44. He was the officer in charge of the defense of U.S. military installations in Hawaii on December 7, 1941. (The Senate absolved him of all responsibility … more than 50 years later.)
HUSBAND KIMMEL

45. This English idealist philosopher’s two most important works, the Prolegomena to Ethics and the Lectures on the Principles of Political Obligation, were not published until after his death.
THOMAS HILL GREEN

46. The best-known designs of this English architect include Buckingham Palace and the Royal Pavilion at Brighton.
CHRISTOPHER WREN

47. The #MeToo movement brought renewed attention to this attorney and activist, who first emerged on the national stage more than two decades earlier.
GLORIA ALLRED

48. This Houston-born diplomat was one of the most trusted advisors to the President of the United States, but after clashes at the Paris Peace Conference, the two never spoke again.
CHARLIE WILSON?

49. One of the great actor-managers of his day – and founder of the Royal Academy of Dramatic Arts – he was knighted in 1909 for his services to the British theatre.
HERBERT BEERBOHM TREE?

50. In a career spanning 48 years, this lyricist put words to the music of – among others – Jerome Kern, Sigmund Romberg, Jimmy McHugh, Arthur Schwartz, and Cy Coleman.
DOROTHY FIELDS

51. At various times, his employees included Henry Ford, African American inventor Lewis Latimer, and film director Edwin S. Porter.

52. This English novelist is best known for a series of eleven novels published over a 30-year span and covering 43 years in the life of a civil servant named Lewis Eliot.
P.G. WODEHOUSE?

53. Winner of nine Triple Crown races, this jockey set a North American record in 1989 when he rode eight out of nine mounts to victory in a single day.
EDDIE ARCARO

54. His rise to power was cemented by the murder of Paul Castellano.
WHITEY BULGER

55. A biography written by this minister is arguably the foundational document of American hagiography.
MASON LOCKE WEEMS

56. This chef’s restaurant La Pyramide was considered the finest in France during his lifetime, but it eventually lost all three of its Michelin stars after his death.

57. The business he founded in Venice, California in 1965 came to be known as “the Mecca of bodybuilding.”
JOE GOLD

58. Along with Agravain, Gareth, and Gaheris, this knight of the Round Table was King Arthur’s nephew by his sister Morgause and King Lot.
SIR GAWAIN

59. This actor completes a list that also includes Mahershala Ali, Walter Brennan, Michael Caine, Melvyn Douglas, Anthony Quinn, Jason Robards, and Peter Ustinov.

60. This former Atlanta mayor currently serves as director of the White House Office of Public Engagement.
KEISHA LANCE BOTTOMS

61. This Scottish-born singer became the leading soprano at the Opera Comique in Paris, where she originated roles in works by Debussy and Massenet.

62. Author of more than 140 novels since 1973, she is currently the world’s best-selling living writer.
BARBARA CARTLAND

63. During the Open Era, he was the youngest player to achieve a career Grand Slam and the first to achieve the Surface Slam.
ARTHUR ASHE?

64. In 1931, this gynecologist was the only Roman Catholic doctor to sign a petition to legalize birth control; two decades later, he oversaw a critical milestone in its development.
JOHN ROCK

65. A year after Svetlana Savitskaya became the second woman to do something, this woman became the third.
SALLY RIDE

66. This social reformer was the first American woman to win the Nobel Peace Prize.
JANE ADDAMS?

67. This English antiquarian won renown for his 1674 history of Oxford University.

68. There is strong evidence that this fashion designer collaborated with – and may even have acted as an agent for – the Nazis, but was shielded from postwar prosecution by Winston Churchill himself.
COCO CHANEL

69. JMMQ: This choreographer’s best-known work, Le Jeune Homme et la Mort, told the story of a young man driven to suicide by his unfaithful lover.
ALVIN AILEY?

70. This cartoonist created the first comic strip in which the characters aged with the years.
(The strip is Gasoline Alley.)

71. He was the only actor to win both the Oscar and the Tony twice.
FREDRIC MARCH

72. In the 1930s, this blues musician was discovered by folklorist John Lomax in a Louisiana prison.
LEADBELLY

73. In January 2017, this prime minister became the first foreign leader to meet with newly inaugurated President Donald Trump.

74. This physicist made his seminal discovery in 1895 while conducting experiments with cathode tubes.
WILHELM ROENTGEN

75. The first nine mystery novels published under this pseudonym each contained a national or geographic designation (Roman, Dutch, Chinese, etc.) in its title.
ELLERY QUEEN

76. After this driver’s 2013 suicide, the chairman of NASCAR released a statement eulogizing him as “a legend in the short track racing community, particularly in his home state of Wisconsin.”

77. In 1848, he suddenly found himself the most famous sawmill owner in America.
JOHN SUTTER

78. As proprietor of the Emporia Gazette, this journalist became a leading figure of the Progressive movement and spokesman for Middle America.
WILLIAM ALLEN WHITE

79. As a master thief-taker, he was responsible for the arrest and hanging of highwayman Jack Sheppard; as a master criminal, he was eventually hanged himself.

80. In 2020, his statue in the U.S. Capitol was replaced by one of civil rights activist Barbara Rose Johns.
ROBERT E. LEE?

81. At the age of nine, he worked twelve hours a day as a crow scarer … later became a key figure in the unionization of British agricultural workers … and eventually wound up in Parliament.

82. The last active player from the NHL’s inaugural season, this Hall-of-Famer won three Stanley Cups with the Toronto St. Pat’s and the Montreal Maroons.
BOBBY ORR?

83. In 1896, this French filmmaker became the first woman to direct a movie.
ALICE GUY BLACHE?

84. Until the advent of Bruce Wayne, the most notable use of a particular costume was in this composer’s most popular operetta.
JOHANN STRAUSS II

85. This chemist for 3M is credited with inventing the adhesive that made Post-It Notes possible.
SPENCER SILVER

86. He was only 22 when he won both the American League MVP and the Cy Young Award.
VIDA BLUE?

87. Many works of this French writer – who ultimately died in a wartime plane crash –were informed by his experiences as a pioneering aviator
ANTOINE DE SAINT-EXUPERY

88. Nominated by President James Madison at the age of 32, he remains the youngest Justice ever to serve on the Supreme Court.
JOSEPH STORY

89. Don Hewett wrote that this broadcasting pioneer “erected two towers of power: one for entertainment and one for news… [He] was the guy who put Frank Sinatra and Edward R. Murrow on the radio.”
WILLIAM S. PALEY

90. On January 8, 1972, her “Problem” broke a major television taboo.
EDITH BUNKER? BEA ARTHUR?

91. This singer amassed an impressive series of hits along with her brother Bubba and her cousins William and Edward.
GLADYS KNIGHT

92. This Russian-American sculptor first gained widespread attention in the 1940s when she exhibited a found shoeshine box at the Museum of Modern Art.

93. This American psychologist is known for his contributions to aptitude testing and his development of drive theory, an attempt to systematically analyze human drives.
STANFORD BINET

94. This novelist famously described her writing as a “little bit (two inches wide) of Ivory on which I work with so fine a Brush.”

95. Though his reputation rests primarily on horror, he directed films in many genres – including what many consider the definitive screen version of a great American musical.
JAMES WHALE

96. A magistrate who tried this religious leader for blasphemy in 1650 gave his followers what was intended to be a mocking soubriquet.
GEORGE FOX (Quakers)

97. In an 1869 essay, this philosopher stated that the “legal subordination of one sex to another is wrong in itself, and now one of the chief hindrances to human improvement.”

98. On a trip to Santa Fe in 1944, his daughter expressed impatience to see a picture he had just take of her; the rest is history.
EDWIN LAND

99. This President famously commented that he could run the country or he could control his daughter, but he couldn’t do both.
THEODORE ROOSEVELT

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Re: Game #208: A Listless Game

#14 Post by kroxquo » Wed Sep 21, 2022 7:29 am

A Bit late to the party, but let me see what I can do.

Game #208: A Listless Game

Identify the 99 people in the clues below and match them into 33 trios according to a Tangredi, or principle you must discover for yourself. No names will be used twice.

Alternate solutions are likely, but only one combination will use all the names.

1. Though not generally known for his writings on social etiquette, he did offer this useful clarification: "A revolution is not a dinner party."

Benjamin Franklin?

3. He is the only player to be named both MVP and Coach of the Year by the NBA

Lenny Wilkens?

5. After jumping ship in 1842, he lived for a time among the people of the Marquesas Islands – an adventure which provided the material for his first two books and gained him the reputation as the "man who lived among the cannibals.”.

Robert Louis Stevenson?

7. He admonished his fellow business leaders that “the man who dies leaving behind him many millions of available wealth which was his to administer during life will pass away ‘unwept, unhonored, and unsung,’ no matter to what uses he leaves the dross which he cannot take with him. Of such as these the public verdict will then be: ‘The man who dies thus rich dies disgraced.’”

Andrew Carnegie

8. This activist stirred considerable controversy when he commented that the assassination of John F Kennedy was a case of “chickens coming home to roost.” (But, then, almost everything he said stirred controversy.)

Malcolm X

11. He took over Thomas Gage’s command in 1775; things didn’t go well after that.

William Howe

13. This physician completes a list that also includes Robert Morris, John Morton, George Clymer, James Smith, George Taylor, James Wilson, George Ross … and, of course, Benjamin Franklin.

Benjamin Rush

15. In his nine seasons with the Denver Broncos, this Hall of Famer amassed a rushing total of 6,323 yards – at the time the 7th highest in the NFL.

Terrell Davis

16. This beloved Danish writer was not so beloved by Charles Dickens, who reportedly modeled the character of Uriah Heep on him.

Hans Christian Andersen

19. She is the linchpin of a romantic quadrangle formed by her husband Charles and her lovers Rodolphe and Léon.

Lady Chatterly?

21. In addition to his influence on political thought, education, and the development of Romanticism, this philosopher was also an advocate of breastfeeding.

John Stuart Mill

26. A classic Honeymooners episode about Ralph’s efforts to find the perfect gift for Alice was one of many works to borrow the basic premise of this author’s most famous work.

O. Henry

29. This actor lost the role in Ghostbusters that eventually went to his colleague Rick Moranis, but at least he got to appear in the music video.

John Candy?

33. She was the first First Lady to visit Sesame Street.

Nancy Reagan

36. After his lithography business failed in 1860, this businessman found a new way to succeed at the game of life.

Milton Bradley

37. In 1934, this American politician proposed a radical economic plan, the provisions of which included a cap on inheritances, incomes, and private fortunes; free higher education for all; a four-day work week with four weeks of paid vacation a year; and free medical service to all citizens.

Huey Long

38. Though this singer charted five number one and 18 top-ten singles on the Billboard country charts, her only crossover hit was a 1970 hit that went to #3 on the pop chart.

Tammy Wynette?

39. In addition to describing the genetic condition that now bears his name, this British physician was a pioneer in improving the treatment of the mentally disabled.

Downs

42. The high point of this pitcher’s nine-year career with the Pirates was a no-hitter against the Mets in 1969; the low point was a wild pitch in 1972 that sent the Reds into the World Series.

Steve Blass

44. He was the officer in charge of the defense of U.S. military installations in Hawaii on December 7, 1941. (The Senate absolved him of all responsibility … more than 50 years later.)

Husband Kimmel

58. Along with Agravain, Gareth, and Gaheris, this knight of the Round Table was King Arthur’s nephew by his sister Morgause and King Lot.

Gawain

62. Author of more than 140 novels since 1973, she is currently the world’s best-selling living writer.

Barbara Cartland?

63. During the Open Era, he was the youngest player to achieve a career Grand Slam and the first to achieve the Surface Slam.

Boris Becker

65. A year after Svetlana Savitskaya became the second woman to do something, this woman became the third.

Sally Ride?

77. In 1848, he suddenly found himself the most famous sawmill owner in America.

Sutter

86. He was only 22 when he won both the American League MVP and the Cy Young Award.

Vida Blue

90. On January 8, 1972, her “Problem” broke a major television taboo.

Maude Findley or Bea Arthur

96. A magistrate who tried this religious leader for blasphemy in 1650 gave his followers what was intended to be a mocking soubriquet.

Mennon

98. On a trip to Santa Fe in 1944, his daughter expressed impatience to see a picture he had just take of her; the rest is history.

George Eastman

99. This President famously commented that he could run the country or he could control his daughter, but he couldn’t do both.

Theodore Roosevelt
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Re: Game #208: A Listless Game

#15 Post by jarnon » Wed Sep 21, 2022 8:29 am

Update with inputs from Weyoun and kroxquo …
franktangredi wrote:
Wed Sep 21, 2022 7:16 am
There are 10 wrong 'definite' answers on this ... or, at least, not the answer I was looking for.

Of those with question marks, 5 are right and 8 are wrong.

Of those with two alternates, 2 include the right answer and 1 does not.
I believe #33 & #90 are right and #38 is wrong.

Identify the 99 people in the clues below and match them into 33 trios according to a Tangredi, or principle you must discover for yourself. No names will be used twice.

Alternate solutions are likely, but only one combination will use all the names.

1. Though not generally known for his writings on social etiquette, he did offer this useful clarification: "A revolution is not a dinner party."
MAO ZEDONG

2. Even members of Congress from the segregated South voted in favor of funding a national monument to this man – the first such monument honoring an African American.
GEORGE WASHINGTON CARVER

3. He is the only player to be named both MVP and Coach of the Year by the NBA
LARRY BIRD

4. He won 21 Tony Awards for producing and/or directing works by Kern and Hammerstein, Bock and Harnick, Kander and Ebb, Adler and Ross, Stephen Sondheim, and Andrew Lloyd Weber.
HAL PRINCE

5. After jumping ship in 1842, he lived for a time among the people of the Marquesas Islands – an adventure which provided the material for his first two books and gained him the reputation as the "man who lived among the cannibals.”
HERMAN MELVILLE

6. A highly uncharacteristic rock ballad on his group’s final album was written in memory of his five-year-old son, who had died the year before.
ROBERT PLANT

7. He admonished his fellow business leaders that “the man who dies leaving behind him many millions of available wealth which was his to administer during life will pass away ‘unwept, unhonored, and unsung,’ no matter to what uses he leaves the dross which he cannot take with him. Of such as these the public verdict will then be: ‘The man who dies thus rich dies disgraced.’”
ANDREW CARNEGIE

8. This activist stirred considerable controversy when he commented that the assassination of John F Kennedy was a case of “chickens coming home to roost.” (But, then, almost everything he said stirred controversy.)
MALCOLM X

9. This artist is best known for two historical paintings depicting the deaths of British military heroes at the moment of their greatest triumphs.
BENJAMIN WEST

10. JMMQ (Judy Murphy Memorial Question): A Prima Ballerina during her 20 years with the Royal Ballet, she left them in 2001 to serve as a Creative Director for the Royal Opera House.
Another JMMQ appears at #69.
MARGOT FONTAINE

11. He took over Thomas Gage’s command in 1775; things didn’t go well after that.
WILLIAM HOWE

12. This influential American sociologist did not coin the term “post-industrial society,” but in a 1973 book he correctly forecast that such a society would be information-led and service-oriented.
ROBERT K. MERTON? DANIEL BELL?

13. This physician completes a list that also includes Robert Morris, John Morton, George Clymer, James Smith, George Taylor, James Wilson, George Ross … and, of course, Benjamin Franklin.
BENJAMIN RUSH

14. This English physicist shared the Nobel Prize in Medicine for his work in developing magnetic resonance imaging.
SIR PETER MANSFIELD

15. In his nine seasons with the Denver Broncos, this Hall of Famer amassed a rushing total of 6,323 yards – at the time the 7th highest in the NFL.
TERRELL DAVIS

16. This beloved Danish writer was not so beloved by Charles Dickens, who reportedly modeled the character of Uriah Heep on him.
HANS CHRISTIAN ANDERSON

17. This actor’s last two completed film roles were adaptations of works by Ernest Hemingway and Agatha Christie.
TYRONE POWER

18. The career of this jazz trumpeter took off in the late 1950s when he began playing with Ornette Coleman; three decades later, his son and stepdaughter made their own appearances on the pop charts.
DON CHERRY

19. She is the linchpin of a romantic quadrangle formed by her husband Charles and her lovers Rodolphe and Léon.
EMMA BOVARY

20. In a 1900 obituary, the New York Times called this proponent of Reform Judaism “the foremost rabbi in America.”
ISAAC MAYER WISE

21. In addition to his influence on political thought, education, and the development of Romanticism, this philosopher was also an advocate of breastfeeding.
JOHN STUART MILL

22. Though she was hanged only for the poisoning of her stepson, she is believed to have murdered three of her four husbands and eleven of her thirteen children for their insurance. (She died of slow strangulation rather than a quick neck break, due to a ‘mistake’ on the part of the hangman.)

23. Longtime president of the organization Consumer Watchdog, this activist is also the author of such books as The Progressive’s Guide to Raising Hell.
JAMIE COURT

24. In 1918, he sent an infamous telegram in which he recommended the public hanging of “no fewer than one hundred known kulaks, fat cats, and bloodsuckers.”
VLADIMIR LENIN

25. This American shared the Nobel Prize in Chemistry for his discoveries regarding ubiquitin-mediated protein degradation. (No, I haven’t any idea what that means.)
IRWIN ROSE

26. A classic Honeymooners episode about Ralph’s efforts to find the perfect gift for Alice was one of many works to borrow the basic premise of this author’s most famous work.
O. HENRY

27. In 1965, a radio station in New York aired a special version of the latest hit by a popular vocal group in which this lead singer held a single note for over a minute. (No, it wasn’t Ethel Merman.)
FRANKIE VALLI?

28. This American tennis player won 18 Grand Slam championships between 1936 and 1940.
ALICE MARBLE

29. This actor lost the role in Ghostbusters that eventually went to his colleague Rick Moranis, but at least he got to appear in the music video.
JOHN CANDY?

30. In a 1908 English novel, he became one of the earliest – and still one of the greatest – portraits of a car freak and reckless driver in literary history.
MR. TOAD (Wind in the Willows)?

31. This economist is best remembered for something he reportedly sketched on a cocktail napkin during a 1974 meeting with Dick Cheney and Donald Rumsfeld.
ARTHUR LAFFER

32. In addition to launching the “It’s Get Better” campaign, this columnist and activist was responsible for Rick Santorum’s “Google problem.”
DAN SAVAGE

33. She was the first First Lady to visit Sesame Street.
BETTY FORD? BARBARA BUSH?

34. Son of a wealthy Kentucky slaveholding family, he converted to abolitionism while a student at Yale after hearing William Lloyd Garrison speak; he was later appointed ambassador to Russia by Abraham Lincoln and helped win the tsar’s support for the Union cause.
CASSIUS CLAY

35. This French-American artist gained renown for her installations and monumental sculptures, especially a 30-feet high spider made of steel, bronze and marble.
LOUISE BORGEOIS

36. After his lithography business failed in 1860, this businessman found a new way to succeed at the game of life.
MILTON BRADLEY

37. In 1934, this American politician proposed a radical economic plan, the provisions of which included a cap on inheritances, incomes, and private fortunes; free higher education for all; a four-day work week with four weeks of paid vacation a year; and free medical service to all citizens.
HUEY LONG

38. Though this singer charted five number one and 18 top-ten singles on the Billboard country charts, her only crossover hit was a 1970 hit that went to #3 on the pop chart.
TAMMY WYNETTE?

39. In addition to describing the genetic condition that now bears his name, this British physician was a pioneer in improving the treatment of the mentally disabled.
JOHN LANGDON DOWN

40. Though some critics find his lyricism ‘slow’ and others accuse him of glorifying poverty, he is still considered his country’s greatest filmmaker – placed by no less than Martin Scorsese on a par with his contemporaries Kurosawa, Bergman, and Fellini.
SATJIYAT RAY?

41. More than a century later, this poet and playwright remains the only Belgian to receive the Nobel Prize for Literature.
MAURICE MAETERLINCK

42. The high point of this pitcher’s nine-year career with the Pirates was a no-hitter against the Mets in 1969; the low point was a wild pitch in 1972 that sent the Reds into the World Series.
BOB MOOSE? STEVE BLASS?

43. After a 1796 expedition down the Niger River, this explorer wrote a book theorizing that the Congo and the Niger eventually merged into a single river – a theory that was finally disproven until 1830.
MUNGO PARK

44. He was the officer in charge of the defense of U.S. military installations in Hawaii on December 7, 1941. (The Senate absolved him of all responsibility … more than 50 years later.)
HUSBAND KIMMEL

45. This English idealist philosopher’s two most important works, the Prolegomena to Ethics and the Lectures on the Principles of Political Obligation, were not published until after his death.
THOMAS HILL GREEN

46. The best-known designs of this English architect include Buckingham Palace and the Royal Pavilion at Brighton.
CHRISTOPHER WREN

47. The #MeToo movement brought renewed attention to this attorney and activist, who first emerged on the national stage more than two decades earlier.
GLORIA ALLRED

48. This Houston-born diplomat was one of the most trusted advisors to the President of the United States, but after clashes at the Paris Peace Conference, the two never spoke again.
EDWARD M. HOUSE

49. One of the great actor-managers of his day – and founder of the Royal Academy of Dramatic Arts – he was knighted in 1909 for his services to the British theatre.
HERBERT BEERBOHM TREE?

50. In a career spanning 48 years, this lyricist put words to the music of – among others – Jerome Kern, Sigmund Romberg, Jimmy McHugh, Arthur Schwartz, and Cy Coleman.
DOROTHY FIELDS

51. At various times, his employees included Henry Ford, African American inventor Lewis Latimer, and film director Edwin S. Porter.
THOMAS EDISON

52. This English novelist is best known for a series of eleven novels published over a 30-year span and covering 43 years in the life of a civil servant named Lewis Eliot.
C.P. SNOW

53. Winner of nine Triple Crown races, this jockey set a North American record in 1989 when he rode eight out of nine mounts to victory in a single day.
EDDIE ARCARO

54. His rise to power was cemented by the murder of Paul Castellano.
WHITEY BULGER

55. A biography written by this minister is arguably the foundational document of American hagiography.
MASON LOCKE WEEMS

56. This chef’s restaurant La Pyramide was considered the finest in France during his lifetime, but it eventually lost all three of its Michelin stars after his death.

57. The business he founded in Venice, California in 1965 came to be known as “the Mecca of bodybuilding.”
JOE GOLD

58. Along with Agravain, Gareth, and Gaheris, this knight of the Round Table was King Arthur’s nephew by his sister Morgause and King Lot.
SIR GAWAIN

59. This actor completes a list that also includes Mahershala Ali, Walter Brennan, Michael Caine, Melvyn Douglas, Anthony Quinn, Jason Robards, and Peter Ustinov.
CHRISTOPH WALTZ

60. This former Atlanta mayor currently serves as director of the White House Office of Public Engagement.
KEISHA LANCE BOTTOMS

61. This Scottish-born singer became the leading soprano at the Opera Comique in Paris, where she originated roles in works by Debussy and Massenet.

62. Author of more than 140 novels since 1973, she is currently the world’s best-selling living writer.
DANIELLE STEEL?

63. During the Open Era, he was the youngest player to achieve a career Grand Slam and the first to achieve the Surface Slam.
ARTHUR ASHE? ROD LAVER? BORIS BECKER?

64. In 1931, this gynecologist was the only Roman Catholic doctor to sign a petition to legalize birth control; two decades later, he oversaw a critical milestone in its development.
JOHN ROCK

65. A year after Svetlana Savitskaya became the second woman to do something, this woman became the third.
SALLY RIDE

66. This social reformer was the first American woman to win the Nobel Peace Prize.
JANE ADDAMS?

67. This English antiquarian won renown for his 1674 history of Oxford University.

68. There is strong evidence that this fashion designer collaborated with – and may even have acted as an agent for – the Nazis, but was shielded from postwar prosecution by Winston Churchill himself.
COCO CHANEL

69. JMMQ: This choreographer’s best-known work, Le Jeune Homme et la Mort, told the story of a young man driven to suicide by his unfaithful lover.
ALVIN AILEY? AUGUST BOURNONVILLE?

70. This cartoonist created the first comic strip in which the characters aged with the years.
(The strip is Gasoline Alley.)

71. He was the only actor to win both the Oscar and the Tony twice.
FREDRIC MARCH

72. In the 1930s, this blues musician was discovered by folklorist John Lomax in a Louisiana prison.
LEADBELLY

73. In January 2017, this prime minister became the first foreign leader to meet with newly inaugurated President Donald Trump.

74. This physicist made his seminal discovery in 1895 while conducting experiments with cathode tubes.
WILHELM ROENTGEN

75. The first nine mystery novels published under this pseudonym each contained a national or geographic designation (Roman, Dutch, Chinese, etc.) in its title.
ELLERY QUEEN

76. After this driver’s 2013 suicide, the chairman of NASCAR released a statement eulogizing him as “a legend in the short track racing community, particularly in his home state of Wisconsin.”
DICK TRICKLE

77. In 1848, he suddenly found himself the most famous sawmill owner in America.
JOHN SUTTER

78. As proprietor of the Emporia Gazette, this journalist became a leading figure of the Progressive movement and spokesman for Middle America.
WILLIAM ALLEN WHITE

79. As a master thief-taker, he was responsible for the arrest and hanging of highwayman Jack Sheppard; as a master criminal, he was eventually hanged himself.

80. In 2020, his statue in the U.S. Capitol was replaced by one of civil rights activist Barbara Rose Johns.
ROBERT E. LEE?

81. At the age of nine, he worked twelve hours a day as a crow scarer … later became a key figure in the unionization of British agricultural workers … and eventually wound up in Parliament.

82. The last active player from the NHL’s inaugural season, this Hall-of-Famer won three Stanley Cups with the Toronto St. Pat’s and the Montreal Maroons.
BOBBY ORR?

83. In 1896, this French filmmaker became the first woman to direct a movie.
ALICE GUY BLACHE?

84. Until the advent of Bruce Wayne, the most notable use of a particular costume was in this composer’s most popular operetta.
JOHANN STRAUSS II

85. This chemist for 3M is credited with inventing the adhesive that made Post-It Notes possible.
SPENCER SILVER

86. He was only 22 when he won both the American League MVP and the Cy Young Award.
VIDA BLUE

87. Many works of this French writer – who ultimately died in a wartime plane crash –were informed by his experiences as a pioneering aviator
ANTOINE DE SAINT-EXUPERY

88. Nominated by President James Madison at the age of 32, he remains the youngest Justice ever to serve on the Supreme Court.
JOSEPH STORY

89. Don Hewett wrote that this broadcasting pioneer “erected two towers of power: one for entertainment and one for news… [He] was the guy who put Frank Sinatra and Edward R. Murrow on the radio.”
WILLIAM S. PALEY

90. On January 8, 1972, her “Problem” broke a major television taboo.
BEA ARTHUR

91. This singer amassed an impressive series of hits along with her brother Bubba and her cousins William and Edward.
GLADYS KNIGHT

92. This Russian-American sculptor first gained widespread attention in the 1940s when she exhibited a found shoeshine box at the Museum of Modern Art.
LOUISE NEVELSON?

93. This American psychologist is known for his contributions to aptitude testing and his development of drive theory, an attempt to systematically analyze human drives.
STANFORD BINET

94. This novelist famously described her writing as a “little bit (two inches wide) of Ivory on which I work with so fine a Brush.”

95. Though his reputation rests primarily on horror, he directed films in many genres – including what many consider the definitive screen version of a great American musical.
JAMES WHALE

96. A magistrate who tried this religious leader for blasphemy in 1650 gave his followers what was intended to be a mocking soubriquet.
GEORGE FOX (Quakers)

97. In an 1869 essay, this philosopher stated that the “legal subordination of one sex to another is wrong in itself, and now one of the chief hindrances to human improvement.”
JOHN STUART MILL

98. On a trip to Santa Fe in 1944, his daughter expressed impatience to see a picture he had just take of her; the rest is history.
EDWIN LAND

99. This President famously commented that he could run the country or he could control his daughter, but he couldn’t do both.
THEODORE ROOSEVELT

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Re: Game #208: A Listless Game

#16 Post by mellytu74 » Wed Sep 21, 2022 9:21 am

70. This cartoonist created the first comic strip in which the characters aged with the years.
(The strip is Gasoline Alley.)

This was driving me nuts. THFD was quite the Gasoline Alley fan. Once described a guy I was dating as a Skeezix type. I had to look it up. So I looked this up.

FRANK KING.


61. This Scottish-born singer became the leading soprano at the Opera Comique in Paris, where she originated roles in works by Debussy and Massenet.

This is possibly MARY GARDEN

90. On January 8, 1972, her “Problem” broke a major television taboo.
BEA ARTHUR

This is definitely JEAN STAPLETON/EDITH BUNKER.

The Maude abortion episode, also 1972, was later in the year. We had to watch it for a class in crisis communications. It was a two-parter toward the end of the semester.


53. Winner of nine Triple Crown races, this jockey set a North American record in 1989 when he rode eight out of nine mounts to victory in a single day.
EDDIE ARCARO

Arcaro was retired by 1989.

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Re: Game #208: A Listless Game

#17 Post by Bob78164 » Wed Sep 21, 2022 11:24 am

82 is not Bobby Orr. The NHL is a lot older than that, and I'm pretty sure he played his whole career with the Bruins. --Bob
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Re: Game #208: A Listless Game

#18 Post by Bob78164 » Wed Sep 21, 2022 11:25 am

I'm wondering whether 21 is Thoreau. --Bob
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Re: Game #208: A Listless Game

#19 Post by mrkelley23 » Wed Sep 21, 2022 11:28 am

38. isn't Donna Fargo, or Jeannie C Reilly or Tammy Wynette or Tanya Tucker or Anne Murray or Jessi Colter or any of the other country crossovers of the 1970s.

It's LYNN ANDERSON, whose only pop hit came with (I Never Promised You a) Rose Garden.
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Re: Game #208: A Listless Game

#20 Post by mrkelley23 » Wed Sep 21, 2022 11:30 am

For #93, the standardized test is called Stanford-Binet, but the Stanford is not Binet's first name. It's ALFRED BINET.
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Re: Game #208: A Listless Game

#21 Post by mrkelley23 » Wed Sep 21, 2022 11:41 am

Ummmm.

This is a "listless" game, which I'm taking to mean no list of associated words.

Maybe the trios are associated words.

We have 38. Lynn Anderson, along with 25. Irwin ROSE and 61. Mary GARDEN.

84 Johann Strauss goes with 59. Christoph WALTZ and 70. Frank KING.

11. William Howe goes with 90. Edith BUNKER and 45. Thomas HILL Green
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Re: Game #208: A Listless Game

#22 Post by jarnon » Wed Sep 21, 2022 11:52 am

That's brilliant, mrkelley23!

74. WILHELM ROENTGEN = 8. Malcolm X + 40. Satjiyat RAY

1. MAO ZEDONG = 37. Huey LONG + 71. Fredric MARCH

5. HERMAN MELVILLE = 78. William Allen WHITE + 95. James WHALE

7. ANDREW CARNEGIE = 62. Danielle STEEL + 97. John Stuart MILL
Last edited by jarnon on Wed Sep 21, 2022 12:04 pm, edited 3 times in total.

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Re: Game #208: A Listless Game

#23 Post by mrkelley23 » Wed Sep 21, 2022 11:55 am

74. Wilhelm Roentgen goes with 8. Malcolm X and 40. Satjiyat RAY

27. Is from Cara Mia by Jay and the Americans. Lead singer's name is JAY BLACK.
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Re: Game #208: A Listless Game

#24 Post by Beebs52 » Wed Sep 21, 2022 12:11 pm

Sutter Gold Rush?
Well, then

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Re: Game #208: A Listless Game

#25 Post by jarnon » Wed Sep 21, 2022 12:20 pm

Two of the missing answers are probably SWAN and GREEN.
Last edited by jarnon on Wed Sep 21, 2022 12:37 pm, edited 2 times in total.

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