Game #206: Dissociation

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Game #206: Dissociation

#1 Post by franktangredi » Mon Jul 19, 2021 12:30 pm

YES, IT'S BEEN A LONG TIME!

Game #206: Dissociation

Identify the 120 people in the clues below and match them into 60 pairs according to a Tangredi, or principle you must discover for yourself. No names will be used twice.

1. He was inarguably the most influential person born in the 6th century CE.

2. In a re-election bid, this President won against a man who was the then-current holder of the same elected office that he (the President) had previously held. Got that?

3. Shortly after this group broke up, the lead guitarist’s wife caught him in bed with the drummer’s wife, which another member of the group called “virtual incest.”.

4. This physicist invented and named the solenoid.

5. In a single year, she starred in classic movies directed by Frank Capra, Howard Hawks, and Preston Sturges – the first two opposite the same leading man.

6. One biographer wrote of this author, “We cannot know to what extent sexual urges lay behind [his] preference for drawing and photographing children in the nude. He contended the preference was entirely aesthetic. But given his emotional attachment to children as well as his aesthetic appreciation of their forms, his assertion that his interest was strictly artistic is naïve. He probably felt more than he dared acknowledge, even to himself.”

7. This tennis great holds the record for the most Grand Slam titles won by a single player during the Open Era.

8. Her seminal book about "the problem that has no name" had its roots in a survey she conducted at her 15-year reunion at Smith College.

9. DJMQ (though anyone can answer): The first ballerina to tour around the world, she was especially known for her imitation of a croaking bird.
Another DJMQ appears at #84.

10. A commemorative stamp honoring this artist depicted his 1876 painting of a fishing boat in Gloucester harbor.

11. This cosmetics queen was the only woman on Time magazine’s list of the 20 most influential business leaders of the 20th century.

12. In a 1651 book, this philosopher became one of the first to develop the concept of the social contract, although it led him to far different conclusions than later articulations by Locke and Rousseau.

13. This Shakespearean character’s musings on the futility of human existence would – more than three centuries later – provide the title for one of the Great American Novels.

14. In 1524, he became the first European navigator to explore the North American coast between New Brunswick and Florida.

15. One translator called his 1925 memoir “an incoherent soup,” while another critic complained "there was not the faintest similarity to a thought and barely a trace of language” – making it perhaps the most influential lousy book of all time.

16. This Greek polymath is credited with determining the area of a circle, introducing the concept of center of gravity, and inventing the compound pulley.

17. He was the first artist to score Top Ten singles in five different decades – but not in his lifetime.

18. His right arm was amputated during an unsuccessful amphibious assault on a Spanish port in the Canary Islands – which did not stop him from returning to his command less than an hour later.

19. In a 1941 film, she played the neglected wife of the man in the preceding clue.

20. His #10 has been retired by the team that he led to what remain – after nearly half a century – their only two NBA championships.

21. The major work of this playwright is credited with establishing the revenge tragedy as a major genre of Elizabethan drama – and strongly influencing a somewhat better play called Hamlet.

22. This American economist and statistician won the Nobel Prize "for his empirically founded interpretation of economic growth which has led to new and deepened insight into the economic and social structure and process of development."

23. The first British chef to be awarded three Michelin stars, he trained such culinary luminaries as Mario Batali, Gordon Ramsay, and Curtis Stone.

24. In addition to his work on the community level, this activist is also a labor organizer, most notably in connection with the Service Employees International Union.

25. He was the plaintiff in a 1927 case in which the Supreme Court ruled that federal plea bargain have no standing with respect to state charges, resulting in his serving time in both federal and Massachusetts state prisons – after which he skipped bail to sell swampland in Florida.

26. This Italian naturalist is best remembered for his experiments disproving the theory of spontaneous generation.

27. Works by this composer can be variously linked to Mother Ann Lee, a notorious Wild West outlaw, Vice President Henry Wallace, and beef.

28. His 1956 political and military victory over Britain and France boosted his international prestige and marked a turning point in relations between his region and the West.

29. This journalist’s question to a Presidential hopeful – "Senator, why do you want to be President?" – is often cited as the beginning of the end of the Senator’s Presidential hopes.

30. This character actor is best remembered for playing the fathers of Carole Lombard and Henry Fonda and the celibate allies of two swashbuckling heroes.

31. Since 1964, she has written 58 novels (so far) – as well as short stories, YA and children’s fiction, essays, plays, and poems – and has been a finalist for the Pulitzer Prize three times (so far) but has never won (so far.)

32. On a chronological list that includes only 23 people, he comes in between David Wells and Randy Johnson.

33. Venetian painting in the 16th century was dominated by three figures: Titian, Tintoretto, and this artist known for his large-scale historical paintings on religious themes.

34. She “was Born in Newgate, and during a Life of continu'd Variety for Threescore Years, besides her Childhood, was Twelve Year a Whore, five times a Wife (whereof once to her own Brother) Twelve Year a Thief, Eight Year a Transported Felon in Virginia, at last grew Rich, liv'd Honest, and died a Penitent.”

35. He led American forces to victory in the Battle of Cowpens, one of the turning points of the American Revolution.

36. According to Weird Al Yankovic, items you can purchase through the company founded by this entrepreneur include “an Alf alarm clock,” “a used pink bathrobe,” and “a Kleenex used by Doctor Dre.”

37. Though not a trained archaeologist, he is credited with discovering a lost citadel on a mountain ridge nearly 8,000 feet above sea level in the Eastern Cordillera.

38. This Scottish Nobel laureate isolated the elements that now make up Group 18 of the periodic table. (I’m sure nobody will remember that I used the exact same clue for the exact same person in the last game I posted here….)

39. Some radio stations refused to play this singer’s signature hit because of the suggestive lyric "I'd do anything for you/Anything you'd want me to.” (Ah, the 1950s.)

40. Her father was a pioneering jet pilot and head of the Federal Aviation Administration under Presidents Kennedy and Johnson; her husband held an even more exalted position.

41. This director made his mark in Hollywood with a series of classic horror films as well as one of the quintessential examples of film noir. (He also helmed an episode of The Twilight Zone starring an actor in one of the preceding clues.

42. This emperor founded the dynasty that ruled much of the Indian subcontinent from 1526 to 1857.

43. From 1964 until her death in 1981, she published dozens of volumes of inspirational and Christian verse, but most of us know her best from greeting cards.

44. In 1947, a nation mourned when this sports hero died after an injury to his upper right leg – though the real cause of death was probably a botched blood transfusion.

45. Known as the “Bentham of Hallamshire,” this British philosopher is best known for his 1821 Essays on the Formation and Publication of Opinions.

46. His best-selling 1966 critique of a government commission fueled the most persistent conspiracy theory in American history.

47. His eminence in his field began in 1742 when he published A Short Treatise on the Game of Whist.

48. A member of the National Cartoonist Society Hall of Fame, he was one of the chief artists for Archie comics for four decades and helped design the original color schemes for Spider-Man and the Fantastic Four.

49. He completes a list that also includes Guy Burgess, Donald Maclean, John Cairncross, and Anthony Blunt.

50. This entrepreneur and innovator came to international prominence in 1962 when he took on the Devil’s Cigarette Lighter.

51. She received a Razzie for Worst Supporting Actress for her portrayal of the daughter of a real-life movie star and an Emmy for Best Supporting Actress for her portrayal of the wife of a real-life U.S. President.

52. This animated icon was inspired by a bombastic character on Fred Allen’s radio show.

53. Two of her eight Grammy nominations were for her featured performance on a hit song by the group Fun.

54. This Italian writer’s masterpiece – a novel in which two young lovers are separated by the machinations of an evil nobleman – was regarded as a veiled attack on the Austrian empire.

55. This legendary coach was an inaugural member of both the College Football Hall of Fame and the Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame.

56. He was the nation’s longest-serving Secretary of the Interior.

57. Committing suicide at the age of 41, this chemist never became aware of the lasting importance of his own work.

58. This self-help and finance guru rejects the term “psychic,” preferring to call herself an “intuitionist.”

59. This powerful Pope and ecclesiastical reformer organized the Fourth Crusade – and subsequently excommunicated the Crusaders when they sacked Constantinople against his wishes.

60. There is no evidence that this military commander ever actually said anything about a “sleeping giant,” but it’s a cool quote anyway.

61. The peak of her film career came with a 1950 comeback that was also something of a farewell – she made only three more screen appearances over the next 33 years.

62. Works by this American historian included biographies of an American President, an American general, a British prime minister, the “Sage of Baltimore,” and two prominent industrial dynasties – one American and one German.

63. According to one biographer, a dinner invitation to her home on the Rue Saint-Honoré was “considered almost as great an honor as being presented at Versailles.”

64. His severe hearing loss has been traced to such causes as his proximity to an exploding drum set and his participation in what the Guinness Book of World Records dubbed the “Loudest Concert Ever.”

65. During his Surrealist period, this German artist developed a graphic technique called frottage which involved the use of pencil or pastel rubbings to create original works of art.

66. This American physicist was co-winner of the Nobel Prize for his discovery of the antiproton.

67. This golfer was the oldest person ever to win a major championship.

68. Elizabethan lyrics often include extravagant compliments to fair ladies, but it’s hard to top this poet’s claim that “There is a garden in her face/Where roses and white lilies blow….”

69. This eponymous hero of a Pulitzer Prize-winning novel leaves his practice in a small North Dakota town to fight bubonic plague in the Caribbean.

70. This Greek statesman – who made a noble but fruitless effort to rouse Athens to the threat posed by Philip of Macedon – eventually committed suicide to avoid being arrested by Philip’s son and successor, Alexander.

71. The agency he founded in 1850 continues to operate, though it is now a subsidiary of a Swedish company specializing in “corporate risk management.”

72. Shortly after he and his sons opened their winery in 1966, he coined the term “"Fumé Blanc" to describe his version of Sauvignon blanc.

73. The way he wore a tool belt contributed to his being named one of the sexiest men on television by People magazine.

74. In 1916, he was assassinated by a group of conservative noblemen – but it wasn’t easy.

75. She had 5 Top Twenty hits in the 1960s, in support of a singer who had 20 other Top Twenty hits without her.

76. In his eulogy for this novelist, Anatole France famously declared, “He was a moment in the conscience of Man.”

77. In addition to their individual careers – one as a novelist, the other as a record producer – these brothers are social media pioneers, having launched their influential joint vlog as early as 2009.

78. This pitcher played his first professional baseball game in 1926 and his last in 1965.

79. In 1942, this American physicist patented a ‘dry’ process that combined electrostatic printing with photography.

80. The only surviving work by this ancient philosopher is a long poem on Epicureanism that also played a major role in the development of the theory of atomism.

81. This prolific Soviet serial killer racked up at least 52 victims between 1978 and 1990.

82. As White House press secretary, he once declared, “The standard for any type of interrogation of somebody in American custody is to be humane and to follow all international laws and accords dealing with this type subject. That is precisely what has been happening and exactly what will happen" – and if you ask him now, he’ll tell you he stands by that statement.

83. This First Lady largely had Mark Twain to thank for the income that sustained her after her husband’s death.

84. DJMQ: They are strongly associated with bunnies, foxes, and turkeys.

85. His stated goal was to “found an institution where any person can find instruction in any study” – at least that’s what it says on my class ring.

86. In 1966, he graduated first in his class at the medical college that bears the name of the man in the previous clue.

87. On July 14, 1973, he smashed his guitar and walked offstage in the middle of a concert, leaving his brother to finish by himself.

88. He was the first African named Man of the Year by Time magazine.

89. Sent by Spain to suppress an insurrection, this general instituted policies that led to his being dubbed “the Butcher” – and helped spark a major U.S. war.

90. The shortest distance from Mozart to Lord Byron is via this randy dude.

91. Claiming that he “had no childhood,” this playwright described his only full-length comedy as an idealized picture of the childhood he wished he had.

92. This Panamian-born stage director is considered the definitive interpreter of the playwright cited in the previous clue.

93. His skillful stick handling earned this centre a Calder Memorial Trophy, a spot on nine All Star teams, and a place in the NHL Hall of Fame; his sportsmanship earned him a Lady Byng Trophy in the 1970s.

94. In 1878, he published a set of cabinet cards that answered the question of how horses actually gallop.

95. In 2003, India’s highest adventure-sports award was renamed in honor of this man who had made worldwide headlines fifty years earlier.

96. "It slices! It dices!" “Set it and forget it!” …. “But wait! There’s more!”

97. He is still an active activist more than half a century after penning the best-selling nonfiction book of 1966.

98. His more benign works, such as “Heaven Is a World of Love,” were far less influential than the 1741 sermon in which he declared, "There is nothing that keeps wicked men at any one moment out of hell, but the mere pleasure of God."

99. This lyricist – and occasional composer – won four Oscars for Best Original Song, a record he shares Sammy Kahn, Jimmy Van Heusen, and Alan Menken.

100. This journalist’s most celebrated exploit was inspired by a novel by Jules Verne.

101. When this American jockey retired in 1959, he held the record for most career wins with 6,032.

102. This actor received one Oscar nomination for playing a title role that had previously earned a nomination for another actor, and another nomination for playing that actor. Got that?

103. This American physicist won the Nobel Prize "for his discoveries concerning the fine structure of the hydrogen spectrum."

104. After fleeing to Holland to escape persecution of Huguenots, this philosopher published his magnum opus, a four-volume biographical dictionary that would influence such Enlightenment thinkers as Denis Diderot.

105. Works by this Italian Jewish polymath include an account of his year as a prisoner in Auschwitz and a collection of short stories which the Royal Institution of Great Britain named the best science book ever written.

106. He became nationally known after the untimely passing of Mr. Kachellek, Mr. Heyer, Mr. Schwimmer, Mr. Weinshank, Mr. May, and the brothers Gusenberg.

107. This Democrat was appointed by Republican Herbert Hoover to succeed the Great Dissenter on the Supreme Court, where he became a stalwart of the Court’s liberal wing.

108. A student of Balenciaga, this fashion designer created couture dresses for First Ladies from Jackie to Michelle, but died before he got to extend the list to Melania or Jill.

109. In 1961, this civil rights activist organized and led the first Freedom Ride.

110. This Confederate cavalry general first earned notoriety for his role in what became known as the Fort Pillow Massacre.

111. “His wits being quite gone, he hit upon the strangest notion that ever madman in this world hit upon.” And the world is better for it.

112. Some 54 years after the fellow in Clue #44, he also died as the result of an occupational hazard in his sport of choice.

113. While his countryman was painting a mural in Rockefeller Center, this artist was painting an equally controversial mural at Dartmouth College – but his survived.

114. A colleague of Freud – whose publishing house he managed – this Austrian analyst devoted much of his career to studying the psychology of creativity.

115. The films of this director – known for his ensemble casts – covered a wide range of milieus, from country music to country houses.

116. No matter what one thinks of this novelist, “Isn’t it pretty to think so?” belongs on any list of the most poignant closing lines ever.

117. In 1923 – at the age of seven – this New York-born violinist made his debut as a soloist with the San Francisco symphony; by age 12, he had made his first recordings; and at the age of 83, he made his last recording … and died.

118. The nine-year-old boy whose life he famously saved in 1885 eventually became the caretaker of the Institute that bore his name.

119. This industrialist wrote, “The man who dies leaving behind him millions of available wealth which was his to administer during life, will pass away unwept, unhonoured and unsung. no matter to what uses he leaves the dross which he cannot take with him. Of such as these the public verdict will then be: The man who dies thus rich dies disgraced."

120. Collateral effects of this ruler’s career includes the expansion of the United States and a better understanding of early Egyptian history.
Last edited by franktangredi on Mon Jul 19, 2021 4:20 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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Re: Game #206: Dissociation

#2 Post by Bob78164 » Mon Jul 19, 2021 4:11 pm

2. John Adams fits the clue.

32. This is pitchers who have thrown perfect games, and I think David Cone's perfecto came between those of Wells and Johnson. --Bob
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Re: Game #206: Dissociation

#3 Post by franktangredi » Mon Jul 19, 2021 4:20 pm

Bob78164 wrote:
Mon Jul 19, 2021 4:11 pm
2. John Adams fits the clue.

32. This is pitchers who have thrown perfect games, and I think David Cone's perfecto came between those of Wells and Johnson. --Bob
Oops, a word got dropped out of Q2. I've corrected it.

2. In a re-election bid, this President won against a man who was the then-current holder of the same elected office that he (the President) had previously held. Got that?

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Re: Game #206: Dissociation

#4 Post by ne1410s » Mon Jul 19, 2021 4:23 pm

52. Foghorn Leghorn
10. Winslow Homer
60. Yamamoto
74. Rasputin
95. Norgay or Hillary
100. Nellie Bly
119. Carnegie
120. Napoleon
101. Eddie Arcaro
"When you argue with a fool, there are two fools in the argument."

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Re: Game #206: Dissociation

#5 Post by mellytu74 » Mon Jul 19, 2021 6:00 pm

Game #206: Dissociation
REAL QUICK PASS

5. In a single year, she starred in classic movies directed by Frank Capra, Howard Hawks, and Preston Sturges – the first two opposite the same leading man.

BARBARA STANWYCK

6. One biographer wrote of this author, “We cannot know to what extent sexual urges lay behind [his] preference for drawing and photographing children in the nude. He contended the preference was entirely aesthetic. But given his emotional attachment to children as well as his aesthetic appreciation of their forms, his assertion that his interest was strictly artistic is naïve. He probably felt more than he dared acknowledge, even to himself.”

LEWIS CARROLL

8. Her seminal book about "the problem that has no name" had its roots in a survey she conducted at her 15-year reunion at Smith College.

BETTY FRIEDAN

10. A commemorative stamp honoring this artist depicted his 1876 painting of a fishing boat in Gloucester harbor.

WINSLOW HOMER

13. This Shakespearean character’s musings on the futility of human existence would – more than three centuries later – provide the title for one of the Great American Novels.

WHO SAID SOUNDAND THE FURY SIGNIFYING NOTHING?

15. One translator called his 1925 memoir “an incoherent soup,” while another critic complained "there was not the faintest similarity to a thought and barely a trace of language” – making it perhaps the most influential lousy book of all time.

ADOLF HITLER

27. Works by this composer can be variously linked to Mother Ann Lee, a notorious Wild West outlaw, Vice President Henry Wallace, and beef.

AARON COPLAND

30. This character actor is best remembered for playing the fathers of Carole Lombard and Henry Fonda and the celibate allies of two swashbuckling heroes.

EUGENE PALLETTE

34. She “was Born in Newgate, and during a Life of continu'd Variety for Threescore Years, besides her Childhood, was Twelve Year a Whore, five times a Wife (whereof once to her own Brother) Twelve Year a Thief, Eight Year a Transported Felon in Virginia, at last grew Rich, liv'd Honest, and died a Penitent.”

MOLL FLANDERS

39. Some radio stations refused to play this singer’s signature hit because of the suggestive lyric "I'd do anything for you/Anything you'd want me to.” (Ah, the 1950s.)

TERESA BREWER

46. His best-selling 1966 critique of a government commission fueled the most persistent conspiracy theory in American history.

KERNER??


61. The peak of her film career came with a 1950 comeback that was also something of a farewell – she made only three more screen appearances over the next 33 years.

GLORIA SWANSON

69. This eponymous hero of a Pulitzer Prize-winning novel leaves his practice in a small North Dakota town to fight bubonic plague in the Caribbean.

ARROWSMITH

78. This pitcher played his first professional baseball game in 1926 and his last in 1965.

SATCHEL PAIGE??

83. This First Lady largely had Mark Twain to thank for the income that sustained her after her husband’s death.

JULIA GRANT

91. Claiming that he “had no childhood,” this playwright described his only full-length comedy as an idealized picture of the childhood he wished he had.

WILLIAM SAROYAN??


99. This lyricist – and occasional composer – won four Oscars for Best Original Song, a record he shares Sammy Kahn, Jimmy Van Heusen, and Alan Menken.

JOHNNY MERCER

100. This journalist’s most celebrated exploit was inspired by a novel by Jules Verne.

NELLIE BLY

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Re: Game #206: Dissociation

#6 Post by mellytu74 » Mon Jul 19, 2021 6:00 pm

Game #206: Dissociation
REAL QUICK PASS

5. In a single year, she starred in classic movies directed by Frank Capra, Howard Hawks, and Preston Sturges – the first two opposite the same leading man.

BARBARA STANWYCK

6. One biographer wrote of this author, “We cannot know to what extent sexual urges lay behind [his] preference for drawing and photographing children in the nude. He contended the preference was entirely aesthetic. But given his emotional attachment to children as well as his aesthetic appreciation of their forms, his assertion that his interest was strictly artistic is naïve. He probably felt more than he dared acknowledge, even to himself.”

LEWIS CARROLL

8. Her seminal book about "the problem that has no name" had its roots in a survey she conducted at her 15-year reunion at Smith College.

BETTY FRIEDAN

10. A commemorative stamp honoring this artist depicted his 1876 painting of a fishing boat in Gloucester harbor.

WINSLOW HOMER

13. This Shakespearean character’s musings on the futility of human existence would – more than three centuries later – provide the title for one of the Great American Novels.

WHO SAID SOUNDAND THE FURY SIGNIFYING NOTHING?

15. One translator called his 1925 memoir “an incoherent soup,” while another critic complained "there was not the faintest similarity to a thought and barely a trace of language” – making it perhaps the most influential lousy book of all time.

ADOLF HITLER

27. Works by this composer can be variously linked to Mother Ann Lee, a notorious Wild West outlaw, Vice President Henry Wallace, and beef.

AARON COPLAND

30. This character actor is best remembered for playing the fathers of Carole Lombard and Henry Fonda and the celibate allies of two swashbuckling heroes.

EUGENE PALLETTE

34. She “was Born in Newgate, and during a Life of continu'd Variety for Threescore Years, besides her Childhood, was Twelve Year a Whore, five times a Wife (whereof once to her own Brother) Twelve Year a Thief, Eight Year a Transported Felon in Virginia, at last grew Rich, liv'd Honest, and died a Penitent.”

MOLL FLANDERS

39. Some radio stations refused to play this singer’s signature hit because of the suggestive lyric "I'd do anything for you/Anything you'd want me to.” (Ah, the 1950s.)

TERESA BREWER

46. His best-selling 1966 critique of a government commission fueled the most persistent conspiracy theory in American history.

KERNER??


61. The peak of her film career came with a 1950 comeback that was also something of a farewell – she made only three more screen appearances over the next 33 years.

GLORIA SWANSON

69. This eponymous hero of a Pulitzer Prize-winning novel leaves his practice in a small North Dakota town to fight bubonic plague in the Caribbean.

ARROWSMITH

78. This pitcher played his first professional baseball game in 1926 and his last in 1965.

SATCHEL PAIGE??

83. This First Lady largely had Mark Twain to thank for the income that sustained her after her husband’s death.

JULIA GRANT

91. Claiming that he “had no childhood,” this playwright described his only full-length comedy as an idealized picture of the childhood he wished he had.

WILLIAM SAROYAN??


99. This lyricist – and occasional composer – won four Oscars for Best Original Song, a record he shares Sammy Kahn, Jimmy Van Heusen, and Alan Menken.

JOHNNY MERCER

100. This journalist’s most celebrated exploit was inspired by a novel by Jules Verne.

NELLIE BLY

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Re: Game #206: Dissociation

#7 Post by kroxquo » Mon Jul 19, 2021 7:18 pm

Identify the 120 people in the clues below and match them into 60 pairs according to a Tangredi, or principle you must discover for yourself. No names will be used twice.

1. He was inarguably the most influential person born in the 6th century CE.

Alexander the Great?

2. In a re-election bid, this President won against a man who was the then-current holder of the same elected office that he (the President) had previously held. Got that?

John Adams

3. Shortly after this group broke up, the lead guitarist’s wife caught him in bed with the drummer’s wife, which another member of the group called “virtual incest.”.

Fleetwood Mac?

6. One biographer wrote of this author, “We cannot know to what extent sexual urges lay behind [his] preference for drawing and photographing children in the nude. He contended the preference was entirely aesthetic. But given his emotional attachment to children as well as his aesthetic appreciation of their forms, his assertion that his interest was strictly artistic is naïve. He probably felt more than he dared acknowledge, even to himself.”

Lewis Carroll

7. This tennis great holds the record for the most Grand Slam titles won by a single player during the Open Era.

Martina Navratilova

10. A commemorative stamp honoring this artist depicted his 1876 painting of a fishing boat in Gloucester harbor.

Winslow Homer

11. This cosmetics queen was the only woman on Time magazine’s list of the 20 most influential business leaders of the 20th century.

Madam C.J. Walker

12. In a 1651 book, this philosopher became one of the first to develop the concept of the social contract, although it led him to far different conclusions than later articulations by Locke and Rousseau.

Thomas Hobbes

13. This Shakespearean character’s musings on the futility of human existence would – more than three centuries later – provide the title for one of the Great American Novels.

Hamlet

14. In 1524, he became the first European navigator to explore the North American coast between New Brunswick and Florida.

Verrazzano

20. His #10 has been retired by the team that he led to what remain – after nearly half a century – their only two NBA championships.

Elgin Baylor?

27. Works by this composer can be variously linked to Mother Ann Lee, a notorious Wild West outlaw, Vice President Henry Wallace, and beef.

Aaron Copeland

28. His 1956 political and military victory over Britain and France boosted his international prestige and marked a turning point in relations between his region and the West.

Nasser

29. This journalist’s question to a Presidential hopeful – "Senator, why do you want to be President?" – is often cited as the beginning of the end of the Senator’s Presidential hopes.

Gary Hart?

32. On a chronological list that includes only 23 people, he comes in between David Wells and Randy Johnson.

It's pitchers who have pitched perfect games. David Cone?

34. She “was Born in Newgate, and during a Life of continu'd Variety for Threescore Years, besides her Childhood, was Twelve Year a Whore, five times a Wife (whereof once to her own Brother) Twelve Year a Thief, Eight Year a Transported Felon in Virginia, at last grew Rich, liv'd Honest, and died a Penitent.”

Moll Flanders

35. He led American forces to victory in the Battle of Cowpens, one of the turning points of the American Revolution.

Nathanael Greene

36. According to Weird Al Yankovic, items you can purchase through the company founded by this entrepreneur include “an Alf alarm clock,” “a used pink bathrobe,” and “a Kleenex used by Doctor Dre.”

Whoever founded eBay

37. Though not a trained archaeologist, he is credited with discovering a lost citadel on a mountain ridge nearly 8,000 feet above sea level in the Eastern Cordillera.

Whoever found Machu Picchu

52. This animated icon was inspired by a bombastic character on Fred Allen’s radio show.

Foghorn Leghorn

55. This legendary coach was an inaugural member of both the College Football Hall of Fame and the Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame.

Pop Warner?

56. He was the nation’s longest-serving Secretary of the Interior.

60. There is no evidence that this military commander ever actually said anything about a “sleeping giant,” but it’s a cool quote anyway.

Yamamoto

61. The peak of her film career came with a 1950 comeback that was also something of a farewell – she made only three more screen appearances over the next 33 years.

Gloria Swanson

64. His severe hearing loss has been traced to such causes as his proximity to an exploding drum set and his participation in what the Guinness Book of World Records dubbed the “Loudest Concert Ever.”

Pete Townshend

67. This golfer was the oldest person ever to win a major championship.

Phil Mickelson

71. The agency he founded in 1850 continues to operate, though it is now a subsidiary of a Swedish company specializing in “corporate risk management.”

Pinkerton

72. Shortly after he and his sons opened their winery in 1966, he coined the term “"Fumé Blanc" to describe his version of Sauvignon blanc.

Gallo?

74. In 1916, he was assassinated by a group of conservative noblemen – but it wasn’t easy.

Rasputin

75. She had 5 Top Twenty hits in the 1960s, in support of a singer who had 20 other Top Twenty hits without her.

Darlene Love?

78. This pitcher played his first professional baseball game in 1926 and his last in 1965.

Satchel Paige

83. This First Lady largely had Mark Twain to thank for the income that sustained her after her husband’s death.

Julia Grant

84. DJMQ: They are strongly associated with bunnies, foxes, and turkeys.

87. On July 14, 1973, he smashed his guitar and walked offstage in the middle of a concert, leaving his brother to finish by himself.

One of the Everly Brothers?

91. Claiming that he “had no childhood,” this playwright described his only full-length comedy as an idealized picture of the childhood he wished he had.

Eugene O'Neill

93. His skillful stick handling earned this centre a Calder Memorial Trophy, a spot on nine All Star teams, and a place in the NHL Hall of Fame; his sportsmanship earned him a Lady Byng Trophy in the 1970s.

Bobby Clarke?

95. In 2003, India’s highest adventure-sports award was renamed in honor of this man who had made worldwide headlines fifty years earlier.

Edmund Hilary

96. "It slices! It dices!" “Set it and forget it!” …. “But wait! There’s more!”

Ro Popeil

97. He is still an active activist more than half a century after penning the best-selling nonfiction book of 1966.

Ralph Nader?

98. His more benign works, such as “Heaven Is a World of Love,” were far less influential than the 1741 sermon in which he declared, "There is nothing that keeps wicked men at any one moment out of hell, but the mere pleasure of God."

Jonathan Edwards

100. This journalist’s most celebrated exploit was inspired by a novel by Jules Verne.

Nellie Blye

101. When this American jockey retired in 1959, he held the record for most career wins with 6,032.

Eddie Arcaro

110. This Confederate cavalry general first earned notoriety for his role in what became known as the Fort Pillow Massacre.

Nathan Bedford Forrest

115. The films of this director – known for his ensemble casts – covered a wide range of milieus, from country music to country houses.

Robert Altman

119. This industrialist wrote, “The man who dies leaving behind him millions of available wealth which was his to administer during life, will pass away unwept, unhonoured and unsung. no matter to what uses he leaves the dross which he cannot take with him. Of such as these the public verdict will then be: The man who dies thus rich dies disgraced."

Andrew Carnegie

120. Collateral effects of this ruler’s career includes the expansion of the United States and a better understanding of early Egyptian history.

Santa Anna
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Re: Game #206: Dissociation

#8 Post by kroxquo » Mon Jul 19, 2021 7:25 pm

franktangredi wrote:
Mon Jul 19, 2021 4:20 pm
Bob78164 wrote:
Mon Jul 19, 2021 4:11 pm
2. John Adams fits the clue.

32. This is pitchers who have thrown perfect games, and I think David Cone's perfecto came between those of Wells and Johnson. --Bob
Oops, a word got dropped out of Q2. I've corrected it.

2. In a re-election bid, this President won against a man who was the then-current holder of the same elected office that he (the President) had previously held. Got that?
Then it's Grover Cleveland
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Re: Game #206: Dissociation

#9 Post by franktangredi » Mon Jul 19, 2021 8:06 pm

kroxquo wrote:
Mon Jul 19, 2021 7:25 pm
franktangredi wrote:
Mon Jul 19, 2021 4:20 pm
Bob78164 wrote:
Mon Jul 19, 2021 4:11 pm
2. John Adams fits the clue.

32. This is pitchers who have thrown perfect games, and I think David Cone's perfecto came between those of Wells and Johnson. --Bob
Oops, a word got dropped out of Q2. I've corrected it.

2. In a re-election bid, this President won against a man who was the then-current holder of the same elected office that he (the President) had previously held. Got that?
Then it's Grover Cleveland
Jeez, this was a bad clue!

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Re: Game #206: Dissociation

#10 Post by kroxquo » Tue Jul 20, 2021 5:09 am

franktangredi wrote:
Mon Jul 19, 2021 8:06 pm
kroxquo wrote:
Mon Jul 19, 2021 7:25 pm
franktangredi wrote:
Mon Jul 19, 2021 4:20 pm


Oops, a word got dropped out of Q2. I've corrected it.

2. In a re-election bid, this President won against a man who was the then-current holder of the same elected office that he (the President) had previously held. Got that?
Then it's Grover Cleveland
Jeez, this was a bad clue!
Upon reflection, I think it's more likely that it's Franklin Roosevelt. In '44, Roosevelt ran for re-election against the sitting governor of NY, Thomas Dewey - a position that Roosevelt had previously held. Cleveland's election in 1892 was not technically a re-election in the sense that he was a sitting President at the time.
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Re: Game #206: Dissociation

#11 Post by littlebeast13 » Tue Jul 20, 2021 9:02 am

75. She had 5 Top Twenty hits in the 1960s, in support of a singer who had 20 other Top Twenty hits without her.

Tammi Terrell


112. Some 54 years after the fellow in Clue #44, he also died as the result of an occupational hazard in his sport of choice.

1947+54 = 2001... gotta be Dale Earnhardt
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Re: Game #206: Dissociation

#12 Post by PanicinDetroit » Tue Jul 20, 2021 10:37 am

My one contribution...

47. His eminence in his field began in 1742 when he published A Short Treatise on the Game of Whist.
EDMOND HOYLE

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Re: Game #206: Dissociation

#13 Post by littlebeast13 » Thu Jul 22, 2021 3:43 am

17. He was the first artist to score Top Ten singles in five different decades – but not in his lifetime.

Michael Jackson
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Re: Game #206: Dissociation

#14 Post by littlebeast13 » Thu Jul 22, 2021 9:17 am

I've got some time for a consolidation....


Game #206: Dissociation

Identify the 120 people in the clues below and match them into 60 pairs according to a Tangredi, or principle you must discover for yourself. No names will be used twice.

1. He was inarguably the most influential person born in the 6th century CE.
ALEXANDER THE GREAT? (No, he's BCE)

2. In a re-election bid, this President won against a man who was the then-current holder of the same elected office that he (the President) had previously held. Got that?
GROVER CLEVELAND? FRANKLIN ROOSEVELT?

3. Shortly after this group broke up, the lead guitarist’s wife caught him in bed with the drummer’s wife, which another member of the group called “virtual incest.”.
FLEETWOOD MAC?

4. This physicist invented and named the solenoid.

5. In a single year, she starred in classic movies directed by Frank Capra, Howard Hawks, and Preston Sturges – the first two opposite the same leading man.
BARBARA STANWYCK

6. One biographer wrote of this author, “We cannot know to what extent sexual urges lay behind [his] preference for drawing and photographing children in the nude. He contended the preference was entirely aesthetic. But given his emotional attachment to children as well as his aesthetic appreciation of their forms, his assertion that his interest was strictly artistic is naïve. He probably felt more than he dared acknowledge, even to himself.”
LEWIS CARROLL

7. This tennis great holds the record for the most Grand Slam titles won by a single player during the Open Era.
MARTINA NAVRATILOVA

8. Her seminal book about "the problem that has no name" had its roots in a survey she conducted at her 15-year reunion at Smith College.
BETTY FRIEDMAN

9. DJMQ (though anyone can answer): The first ballerina to tour around the world, she was especially known for her imitation of a croaking bird.
Another DJMQ appears at #84.

10. A commemorative stamp honoring this artist depicted his 1876 painting of a fishing boat in Gloucester harbor.
WINSLOW HOMER

11. This cosmetics queen was the only woman on Time magazine’s list of the 20 most influential business leaders of the 20th century.
MADAM C.J. WALKER

12. In a 1651 book, this philosopher became one of the first to develop the concept of the social contract, although it led him to far different conclusions than later articulations by Locke and Rousseau.
THOMAS HOBBES

13. This Shakespearean character’s musings on the futility of human existence would – more than three centuries later – provide the title for one of the Great American Novels.
HAMLET

14. In 1524, he became the first European navigator to explore the North American coast between New Brunswick and Florida.
VERRAZZANO

15. One translator called his 1925 memoir “an incoherent soup,” while another critic complained "there was not the faintest similarity to a thought and barely a trace of language” – making it perhaps the most influential lousy book of all time.
ADOLF HITLER

16. This Greek polymath is credited with determining the area of a circle, introducing the concept of center of gravity, and inventing the compound pulley.

17. He was the first artist to score Top Ten singles in five different decades – but not in his lifetime.
MICHAEL JACKSON

18. His right arm was amputated during an unsuccessful amphibious assault on a Spanish port in the Canary Islands – which did not stop him from returning to his command less than an hour later.

19. In a 1941 film, she played the neglected wife of the man in the preceding clue.

20. His #10 has been retired by the team that he led to what remain – after nearly half a century – their only two NBA championships.
ELGIN BAYLOR?

21. The major work of this playwright is credited with establishing the revenge tragedy as a major genre of Elizabethan drama – and strongly influencing a somewhat better play called Hamlet.

22. This American economist and statistician won the Nobel Prize "for his empirically founded interpretation of economic growth which has led to new and deepened insight into the economic and social structure and process of development."

23. The first British chef to be awarded three Michelin stars, he trained such culinary luminaries as Mario Batali, Gordon Ramsay, and Curtis Stone.

24. In addition to his work on the community level, this activist is also a labor organizer, most notably in connection with the Service Employees International Union.

25. He was the plaintiff in a 1927 case in which the Supreme Court ruled that federal plea bargain have no standing with respect to state charges, resulting in his serving time in both federal and Massachusetts state prisons – after which he skipped bail to sell swampland in Florida.

26. This Italian naturalist is best remembered for his experiments disproving the theory of spontaneous generation.

27. Works by this composer can be variously linked to Mother Ann Lee, a notorious Wild West outlaw, Vice President Henry Wallace, and beef.
AARON COPLAND

28. His 1956 political and military victory over Britain and France boosted his international prestige and marked a turning point in relations between his region and the West.
NASSER

29. This journalist’s question to a Presidential hopeful – "Senator, why do you want to be President?" – is often cited as the beginning of the end of the Senator’s Presidential hopes.
GARY HART?

30. This character actor is best remembered for playing the fathers of Carole Lombard and Henry Fonda and the celibate allies of two swashbuckling heroes.
EUGENE PALLETTE

31. Since 1964, she has written 58 novels (so far) – as well as short stories, YA and children’s fiction, essays, plays, and poems – and has been a finalist for the Pulitzer Prize three times (so far) but has never won (so far.)

32. On a chronological list that includes only 23 people, he comes in between David Wells and Randy Johnson.
DAVID CONE

33. Venetian painting in the 16th century was dominated by three figures: Titian, Tintoretto, and this artist known for his large-scale historical paintings on religious themes.

34. She “was Born in Newgate, and during a Life of continu'd Variety for Threescore Years, besides her Childhood, was Twelve Year a Whore, five times a Wife (whereof once to her own Brother) Twelve Year a Thief, Eight Year a Transported Felon in Virginia, at last grew Rich, liv'd Honest, and died a Penitent.”
MOLL FLANDERS

35. He led American forces to victory in the Battle of Cowpens, one of the turning points of the American Revolution.
NATHANAEL GREENE

36. According to Weird Al Yankovic, items you can purchase through the company founded by this entrepreneur include “an Alf alarm clock,” “a used pink bathrobe,” and “a Kleenex used by Doctor Dre.”
PIERRE OMIDYAR (Yes, I looked it up)

37. Though not a trained archaeologist, he is credited with discovering a lost citadel on a mountain ridge nearly 8,000 feet above sea level in the Eastern Cordillera.

38. This Scottish Nobel laureate isolated the elements that now make up Group 18 of the periodic table. (I’m sure nobody will remember that I used the exact same clue for the exact same person in the last game I posted here….)

39. Some radio stations refused to play this singer’s signature hit because of the suggestive lyric "I'd do anything for you/Anything you'd want me to.” (Ah, the 1950s.)
TERESA BREWER

40. Her father was a pioneering jet pilot and head of the Federal Aviation Administration under Presidents Kennedy and Johnson; her husband held an even more exalted position.

41. This director made his mark in Hollywood with a series of classic horror films as well as one of the quintessential examples of film noir. (He also helmed an episode of The Twilight Zone starring an actor in one of the preceding clues.

42. This emperor founded the dynasty that ruled much of the Indian subcontinent from 1526 to 1857.

43. From 1964 until her death in 1981, she published dozens of volumes of inspirational and Christian verse, but most of us know her best from greeting cards.

44. In 1947, a nation mourned when this sports hero died after an injury to his upper right leg – though the real cause of death was probably a botched blood transfusion.

45. Known as the “Bentham of Hallamshire,” this British philosopher is best known for his 1821 Essays on the Formation and Publication of Opinions.

46. His best-selling 1966 critique of a government commission fueled the most persistent conspiracy theory in American history.
OTTO KERNER?

47. His eminence in his field began in 1742 when he published A Short Treatise on the Game of Whist.
EDMOND HOYLE

48. A member of the National Cartoonist Society Hall of Fame, he was one of the chief artists for Archie comics for four decades and helped design the original color schemes for Spider-Man and the Fantastic Four.

49. He completes a list that also includes Guy Burgess, Donald Maclean, John Cairncross, and Anthony Blunt.

50. This entrepreneur and innovator came to international prominence in 1962 when he took on the Devil’s Cigarette Lighter.

51. She received a Razzie for Worst Supporting Actress for her portrayal of the daughter of a real-life movie star and an Emmy for Best Supporting Actress for her portrayal of the wife of a real-life U.S. President.

52. This animated icon was inspired by a bombastic character on Fred Allen’s radio show.
FOGHORN LEGHORN

53. Two of her eight Grammy nominations were for her featured performance on a hit song by the group Fun.

54. This Italian writer’s masterpiece – a novel in which two young lovers are separated by the machinations of an evil nobleman – was regarded as a veiled attack on the Austrian empire.

55. This legendary coach was an inaugural member of both the College Football Hall of Fame and the Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame.
POP WARNER?

56. He was the nation’s longest-serving Secretary of the Interior.

57. Committing suicide at the age of 41, this chemist never became aware of the lasting importance of his own work.

58. This self-help and finance guru rejects the term “psychic,” preferring to call herself an “intuitionist.”

59. This powerful Pope and ecclesiastical reformer organized the Fourth Crusade – and subsequently excommunicated the Crusaders when they sacked Constantinople against his wishes.

60. There is no evidence that this military commander ever actually said anything about a “sleeping giant,” but it’s a cool quote anyway.
YAMAMOTO

61. The peak of her film career came with a 1950 comeback that was also something of a farewell – she made only three more screen appearances over the next 33 years.
GLORIA SWANSON

62. Works by this American historian included biographies of an American President, an American general, a British prime minister, the “Sage of Baltimore,” and two prominent industrial dynasties – one American and one German.

63. According to one biographer, a dinner invitation to her home on the Rue Saint-Honoré was “considered almost as great an honor as being presented at Versailles.”

64. His severe hearing loss has been traced to such causes as his proximity to an exploding drum set and his participation in what the Guinness Book of World Records dubbed the “Loudest Concert Ever.”
PETE TOWNSHEND

65. During his Surrealist period, this German artist developed a graphic technique called frottage which involved the use of pencil or pastel rubbings to create original works of art.

66. This American physicist was co-winner of the Nobel Prize for his discovery of the antiproton.

67. This golfer was the oldest person ever to win a major championship.
PHIL MICKELSON

68. Elizabethan lyrics often include extravagant compliments to fair ladies, but it’s hard to top this poet’s claim that “There is a garden in her face/Where roses and white lilies blow….”

69. This eponymous hero of a Pulitzer Prize-winning novel leaves his practice in a small North Dakota town to fight bubonic plague in the Caribbean.
ARROWSMITH

70. This Greek statesman – who made a noble but fruitless effort to rouse Athens to the threat posed by Philip of Macedon – eventually committed suicide to avoid being arrested by Philip’s son and successor, Alexander.

71. The agency he founded in 1850 continues to operate, though it is now a subsidiary of a Swedish company specializing in “corporate risk management.”
ALLAN PINKERTON

72. Shortly after he and his sons opened their winery in 1966, he coined the term “"Fumé Blanc" to describe his version of Sauvignon blanc.
GALLO?

73. The way he wore a tool belt contributed to his being named one of the sexiest men on television by People magazine.

74. In 1916, he was assassinated by a group of conservative noblemen – but it wasn’t easy.
RASPUTIN

75. She had 5 Top Twenty hits in the 1960s, in support of a singer who had 20 other Top Twenty hits without her.
DARLENE LOVE? TAMMI TERRELL (Pretty sure it's Terrell)

76. In his eulogy for this novelist, Anatole France famously declared, “He was a moment in the conscience of Man.”

77. In addition to their individual careers – one as a novelist, the other as a record producer – these brothers are social media pioneers, having launched their influential joint vlog as early as 2009.

78. This pitcher played his first professional baseball game in 1926 and his last in 1965.
SATCHEL PAIGE

79. In 1942, this American physicist patented a ‘dry’ process that combined electrostatic printing with photography.

80. The only surviving work by this ancient philosopher is a long poem on Epicureanism that also played a major role in the development of the theory of atomism.

81. This prolific Soviet serial killer racked up at least 52 victims between 1978 and 1990.

82. As White House press secretary, he once declared, “The standard for any type of interrogation of somebody in American custody is to be humane and to follow all international laws and accords dealing with this type subject. That is precisely what has been happening and exactly what will happen" – and if you ask him now, he’ll tell you he stands by that statement.

83. This First Lady largely had Mark Twain to thank for the income that sustained her after her husband’s death.
JULIA GRANT

84. DJMQ: They are strongly associated with bunnies, foxes, and turkeys.

85. His stated goal was to “found an institution where any person can find instruction in any study” – at least that’s what it says on my class ring.

86. In 1966, he graduated first in his class at the medical college that bears the name of the man in the previous clue.

87. On July 14, 1973, he smashed his guitar and walked offstage in the middle of a concert, leaving his brother to finish by himself.
ONE OF THE EVERLYS?

88. He was the first African named Man of the Year by Time magazine.

89. Sent by Spain to suppress an insurrection, this general instituted policies that led to his being dubbed “the Butcher” – and helped spark a major U.S. war.

90. The shortest distance from Mozart to Lord Byron is via this randy dude.

91. Claiming that he “had no childhood,” this playwright described his only full-length comedy as an idealized picture of the childhood he wished he had.
WILLIAM SAROYAN? EUGENE O'NEILL?

92. This Panamian-born stage director is considered the definitive interpreter of the playwright cited in the previous clue.

93. His skillful stick handling earned this centre a Calder Memorial Trophy, a spot on nine All Star teams, and a place in the NHL Hall of Fame; his sportsmanship earned him a Lady Byng Trophy in the 1970s.
BOBBY CLARKE?

94. In 1878, he published a set of cabinet cards that answered the question of how horses actually gallop.

95. In 2003, India’s highest adventure-sports award was renamed in honor of this man who had made worldwide headlines fifty years earlier.
TENZING NORGAY? EDMUND HILLARY?

96. "It slices! It dices!" “Set it and forget it!” …. “But wait! There’s more!”
RON POPEIL

97. He is still an active activist more than half a century after penning the best-selling nonfiction book of 1966.
RALPH NADER?

98. His more benign works, such as “Heaven Is a World of Love,” were far less influential than the 1741 sermon in which he declared, "There is nothing that keeps wicked men at any one moment out of hell, but the mere pleasure of God."
JONATHAN EDWARDS

99. This lyricist – and occasional composer – won four Oscars for Best Original Song, a record he shares Sammy Kahn, Jimmy Van Heusen, and Alan Menken.
JOHNNY MERCER

100. This journalist’s most celebrated exploit was inspired by a novel by Jules Verne.
NELLIE BLY

101. When this American jockey retired in 1959, he held the record for most career wins with 6,032.
EDDIE ARCARO

102. This actor received one Oscar nomination for playing a title role that had previously earned a nomination for another actor, and another nomination for playing that actor. Got that?

103. This American physicist won the Nobel Prize "for his discoveries concerning the fine structure of the hydrogen spectrum."

104. After fleeing to Holland to escape persecution of Huguenots, this philosopher published his magnum opus, a four-volume biographical dictionary that would influence such Enlightenment thinkers as Denis Diderot.

105. Works by this Italian Jewish polymath include an account of his year as a prisoner in Auschwitz and a collection of short stories which the Royal Institution of Great Britain named the best science book ever written.

106. He became nationally known after the untimely passing of Mr. Kachellek, Mr. Heyer, Mr. Schwimmer, Mr. Weinshank, Mr. May, and the brothers Gusenberg.

107. This Democrat was appointed by Republican Herbert Hoover to succeed the Great Dissenter on the Supreme Court, where he became a stalwart of the Court’s liberal wing.

108. A student of Balenciaga, this fashion designer created couture dresses for First Ladies from Jackie to Michelle, but died before he got to extend the list to Melania or Jill.

109. In 1961, this civil rights activist organized and led the first Freedom Ride.

110. This Confederate cavalry general first earned notoriety for his role in what became known as the Fort Pillow Massacre.
NATHAN BEDFORD FORREST

111. “His wits being quite gone, he hit upon the strangest notion that ever madman in this world hit upon.” And the world is better for it.

112. Some 54 years after the fellow in Clue #44, he also died as the result of an occupational hazard in his sport of choice.
DALE EARNHARDT

113. While his countryman was painting a mural in Rockefeller Center, this artist was painting an equally controversial mural at Dartmouth College – but his survived.

114. A colleague of Freud – whose publishing house he managed – this Austrian analyst devoted much of his career to studying the psychology of creativity.

115. The films of this director – known for his ensemble casts – covered a wide range of milieus, from country music to country houses.
ROBERT ALTMAN

116. No matter what one thinks of this novelist, “Isn’t it pretty to think so?” belongs on any list of the most poignant closing lines ever.

117. In 1923 – at the age of seven – this New York-born violinist made his debut as a soloist with the San Francisco symphony; by age 12, he had made his first recordings; and at the age of 83, he made his last recording … and died.

118. The nine-year-old boy whose life he famously saved in 1885 eventually became the caretaker of the Institute that bore his name.

119. This industrialist wrote, “The man who dies leaving behind him millions of available wealth which was his to administer during life, will pass away unwept, unhonoured and unsung. no matter to what uses he leaves the dross which he cannot take with him. Of such as these the public verdict will then be: The man who dies thus rich dies disgraced."
ANDREW CARNEGIE

120. Collateral effects of this ruler’s career includes the expansion of the United States and a better understanding of early Egyptian history.
SANTA ANNA? or maybe NAPOLEON?
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Re: Game #206: Dissociation

#15 Post by earendel » Thu Jul 22, 2021 9:39 am

Here are some additional contributions:

#1 - Attila the Hun

#16 - Archimedes

#18 - Horatio Nelson

#22 - Simon Kuznets

#26 - Francesco Redi

#38 - Sir William Ramsay

#45 - Samuel Bailey

#56 - Harold Ickes

#66 - Owen Chamberlain

#68 - Thomas Campion
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Re: Game #206: Dissociation

#16 Post by kroxquo » Thu Jul 22, 2021 9:41 am

littlebeast13 wrote:
Thu Jul 22, 2021 9:17 am


120. Collateral effects of this ruler’s career includes the expansion of the United States and a better understanding of early Egyptian history.
SANTA ANNA? or maybe NAPOLEON?
I would say eliminate my guess of Santa Anna. Napoleon makes MUCH more sense.
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Re: Game #206: Dissociation

#17 Post by mrkelley23 » Thu Jul 22, 2021 10:22 am

A few contributions.
littlebeast13 wrote:
Thu Jul 22, 2021 9:17 am
I've got some time for a consolidation....


Game #206: Dissociation

Identify the 120 people in the clues below and match them into 60 pairs according to a Tangredi, or principle you must discover for yourself. No names will be used twice.

1. He was inarguably the most influential person born in the 6th century CE.
ALEXANDER THE GREAT? (No, he's BCE)

Gotta be MUHAMMAD


4. This physicist invented and named the solenoid.

AMPERE


8. Her seminal book about "the problem that has no name" had its roots in a survey she conducted at her 15-year reunion at Smith College.
BETTY FRIEDMAN

Friedman or Friedan?

13. This Shakespearean character’s musings on the futility of human existence would – more than three centuries later – provide the title for one of the Great American Novels.

HAMLET

I thought Melly said it was The Sound and the fury, which would make it from MACBETH's soliloquy.

16. This Greek polymath is credited with determining the area of a circle, introducing the concept of center of gravity, and inventing the compound pulley.

ARCHIMEDES?



26. This Italian naturalist is best remembered for his experiments disproving the theory of spontaneous generation.

REDI


29. This journalist’s question to a Presidential hopeful – "Senator, why do you want to be President?" – is often cited as the beginning of the end of the Senator’s Presidential hopes.
GARY HART?

TED KENNEDY



38. This Scottish Nobel laureate isolated the elements that now make up Group 18 of the periodic table. (I’m sure nobody will remember that I used the exact same clue for the exact same person in the last game I posted here….)

WILLIAM RAMSAY



49. He completes a list that also includes Guy Burgess, Donald Maclean, John Cairncross, and Anthony Blunt.

KIM PHILBY


53. Two of her eight Grammy nominations were for her featured performance on a hit song by the group Fun.

JANELLE MONAE?



66. This American physicist was co-winner of the Nobel Prize for his discovery of the antiproton.

OWEN CHAMBERLAIN

67. This golfer was the oldest person ever to win a major championship.
PHIL MICKELSON

Would Frank have used the word "was" to describe Mickelson?



73. The way he wore a tool belt contributed to his being named one of the sexiest men on television by People magazine.

TY something, the carpenter from Trading Spaces.


79. In 1942, this American physicist patented a ‘dry’ process that combined electrostatic printing with photography.

CHESTER CARLSON

80. The only surviving work by this ancient philosopher is a long poem on Epicureanism that also played a major role in the development of the theory of atomism.

LUCRETIUS?


82. As White House press secretary, he once declared, “The standard for any type of interrogation of somebody in American custody is to be humane and to follow all international laws and accords dealing with this type subject. That is precisely what has been happening and exactly what will happen" – and if you ask him now, he’ll tell you he stands by that statement.

Was ARI FLEISCHER still press sec when 43 was waterboarding people?



88. He was the first African named Man of the Year by Time magazine.

HAILE SELASSIE?


103. This American physicist won the Nobel Prize "for his discoveries concerning the fine structure of the hydrogen spectrum."

WILLIS LAMB

116. No matter what one thinks of this novelist, “Isn’t it pretty to think so?” belongs on any list of the most poignant closing lines ever.

ERNEST HEMINGWAY

For a successful technology, reality must take precedence over public relations, for Nature cannot be fooled. -- Richard Feynman

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Re: Game #206: Dissociation

#18 Post by Bob78164 » Thu Jul 22, 2021 10:40 am

mrkelley23 wrote:
Thu Jul 22, 2021 10:22 am
29. This journalist’s question to a Presidential hopeful – "Senator, why do you want to be President?" – is often cited as the beginning of the end of the Senator’s Presidential hopes.
GARY HART?

TED KENNEDY
The question asks for the journalist, not the politician.

And I'll never forget the classic Doonesbury line, "A verb, Senator. We need a verb!" --Bob
"Question with boldness even the existence of a God; because, if there be one, he must more approve of the homage of reason than that of blindfolded fear." Thomas Jefferson

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Re: Game #206: Dissociation

#19 Post by Vandal » Thu Jul 22, 2021 11:09 am

Bob78164 wrote:
Thu Jul 22, 2021 10:40 am
mrkelley23 wrote:
Thu Jul 22, 2021 10:22 am
29. This journalist’s question to a Presidential hopeful – "Senator, why do you want to be President?" – is often cited as the beginning of the end of the Senator’s Presidential hopes.
GARY HART?

TED KENNEDY
The question asks for the journalist, not the politician.

And I'll never forget the classic Doonesbury line, "A verb, Senator. We need a verb!" --Bob
Roger Mudd asked the question.


18. His right arm was amputated during an unsuccessful amphibious assault on a Spanish port in the Canary Islands – which did not stop him from returning to his command less than an hour later.
Horatio Nelson


73. The way he wore a tool belt contributed to his being named one of the sexiest men on television by People magazine.
Carter Oosterhouse
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Re: Game #206: Dissociation

#20 Post by mellytu74 » Thu Jul 22, 2021 11:13 am

67. This golfer was the oldest person ever to win a major championship.
PHIL MICKELSON

Would Frank have used the word "was" to describe Mickelson?


Isn't this JULIUS BOROS?

93. His skillful stick handling earned this centre a Calder Memorial Trophy, a spot on nine All Star teams, and a place in the NHL Hall of Fame; his sportsmanship earned him a Lady Byng Trophy in the 1970s.
BOBBY CLARKE?

No Flyer has ever won the Lady Byng for sportsmanship - especially in the 1970s :D

I think we're looking at someone more like GILBERT PERREAULT. Maybe MARCEL DIONNE.
Last edited by mellytu74 on Thu Jul 22, 2021 11:25 am, edited 1 time in total.

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Re: Game #206: Dissociation

#21 Post by Bob Juch » Thu Jul 22, 2021 11:18 am

#1 is probably Buddha.
I may not have gone where I intended to go, but I think I have ended up where I needed to be.
- Douglas Adams (1952 - 2001)

Si fractum non sit, noli id reficere.

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Re: Game #206: Dissociation

#22 Post by franktangredi » Thu Jul 22, 2021 11:30 am

Some of the later comments may already have corrected these, but let's keep it simple.

There are 5 'definite' answers that are wrong, or at least not what I had in mind.

Of the ones with a question mark, two are correct.

All of the ones that have two alternate answers include the correct answer.
littlebeast13 wrote:
Thu Jul 22, 2021 9:17 am
I've got some time for a consolidation....


Game #206: Dissociation

Identify the 120 people in the clues below and match them into 60 pairs according to a Tangredi, or principle you must discover for yourself. No names will be used twice.

1. He was inarguably the most influential person born in the 6th century CE.
ALEXANDER THE GREAT? (No, he's BCE)

2. In a re-election bid, this President won against a man who was the then-current holder of the same elected office that he (the President) had previously held. Got that?
GROVER CLEVELAND? FRANKLIN ROOSEVELT?

3. Shortly after this group broke up, the lead guitarist’s wife caught him in bed with the drummer’s wife, which another member of the group called “virtual incest.”.
FLEETWOOD MAC?

4. This physicist invented and named the solenoid.

5. In a single year, she starred in classic movies directed by Frank Capra, Howard Hawks, and Preston Sturges – the first two opposite the same leading man.
BARBARA STANWYCK

6. One biographer wrote of this author, “We cannot know to what extent sexual urges lay behind [his] preference for drawing and photographing children in the nude. He contended the preference was entirely aesthetic. But given his emotional attachment to children as well as his aesthetic appreciation of their forms, his assertion that his interest was strictly artistic is naïve. He probably felt more than he dared acknowledge, even to himself.”
LEWIS CARROLL

7. This tennis great holds the record for the most Grand Slam titles won by a single player during the Open Era.
MARTINA NAVRATILOVA

8. Her seminal book about "the problem that has no name" had its roots in a survey she conducted at her 15-year reunion at Smith College.
BETTY FRIEDMAN

9. DJMQ (though anyone can answer): The first ballerina to tour around the world, she was especially known for her imitation of a croaking bird.
Another DJMQ appears at #84.

10. A commemorative stamp honoring this artist depicted his 1876 painting of a fishing boat in Gloucester harbor.
WINSLOW HOMER

11. This cosmetics queen was the only woman on Time magazine’s list of the 20 most influential business leaders of the 20th century.
MADAM C.J. WALKER

12. In a 1651 book, this philosopher became one of the first to develop the concept of the social contract, although it led him to far different conclusions than later articulations by Locke and Rousseau.
THOMAS HOBBES

13. This Shakespearean character’s musings on the futility of human existence would – more than three centuries later – provide the title for one of the Great American Novels.
HAMLET

14. In 1524, he became the first European navigator to explore the North American coast between New Brunswick and Florida.
VERRAZZANO

15. One translator called his 1925 memoir “an incoherent soup,” while another critic complained "there was not the faintest similarity to a thought and barely a trace of language” – making it perhaps the most influential lousy book of all time.
ADOLF HITLER

16. This Greek polymath is credited with determining the area of a circle, introducing the concept of center of gravity, and inventing the compound pulley.

17. He was the first artist to score Top Ten singles in five different decades – but not in his lifetime.
MICHAEL JACKSON

18. His right arm was amputated during an unsuccessful amphibious assault on a Spanish port in the Canary Islands – which did not stop him from returning to his command less than an hour later.

19. In a 1941 film, she played the neglected wife of the man in the preceding clue.

20. His #10 has been retired by the team that he led to what remain – after nearly half a century – their only two NBA championships.
ELGIN BAYLOR?

21. The major work of this playwright is credited with establishing the revenge tragedy as a major genre of Elizabethan drama – and strongly influencing a somewhat better play called Hamlet.

22. This American economist and statistician won the Nobel Prize "for his empirically founded interpretation of economic growth which has led to new and deepened insight into the economic and social structure and process of development."

23. The first British chef to be awarded three Michelin stars, he trained such culinary luminaries as Mario Batali, Gordon Ramsay, and Curtis Stone.

24. In addition to his work on the community level, this activist is also a labor organizer, most notably in connection with the Service Employees International Union.

25. He was the plaintiff in a 1927 case in which the Supreme Court ruled that federal plea bargain have no standing with respect to state charges, resulting in his serving time in both federal and Massachusetts state prisons – after which he skipped bail to sell swampland in Florida.

26. This Italian naturalist is best remembered for his experiments disproving the theory of spontaneous generation.

27. Works by this composer can be variously linked to Mother Ann Lee, a notorious Wild West outlaw, Vice President Henry Wallace, and beef.
AARON COPLAND

28. His 1956 political and military victory over Britain and France boosted his international prestige and marked a turning point in relations between his region and the West.
NASSER

29. This journalist’s question to a Presidential hopeful – "Senator, why do you want to be President?" – is often cited as the beginning of the end of the Senator’s Presidential hopes.
GARY HART?

30. This character actor is best remembered for playing the fathers of Carole Lombard and Henry Fonda and the celibate allies of two swashbuckling heroes.
EUGENE PALLETTE

31. Since 1964, she has written 58 novels (so far) – as well as short stories, YA and children’s fiction, essays, plays, and poems – and has been a finalist for the Pulitzer Prize three times (so far) but has never won (so far.)

32. On a chronological list that includes only 23 people, he comes in between David Wells and Randy Johnson.
DAVID CONE

33. Venetian painting in the 16th century was dominated by three figures: Titian, Tintoretto, and this artist known for his large-scale historical paintings on religious themes.

34. She “was Born in Newgate, and during a Life of continu'd Variety for Threescore Years, besides her Childhood, was Twelve Year a Whore, five times a Wife (whereof once to her own Brother) Twelve Year a Thief, Eight Year a Transported Felon in Virginia, at last grew Rich, liv'd Honest, and died a Penitent.”
MOLL FLANDERS

35. He led American forces to victory in the Battle of Cowpens, one of the turning points of the American Revolution.
NATHANAEL GREENE

36. According to Weird Al Yankovic, items you can purchase through the company founded by this entrepreneur include “an Alf alarm clock,” “a used pink bathrobe,” and “a Kleenex used by Doctor Dre.”
PIERRE OMIDYAR (Yes, I looked it up)

37. Though not a trained archaeologist, he is credited with discovering a lost citadel on a mountain ridge nearly 8,000 feet above sea level in the Eastern Cordillera.

38. This Scottish Nobel laureate isolated the elements that now make up Group 18 of the periodic table. (I’m sure nobody will remember that I used the exact same clue for the exact same person in the last game I posted here….)

39. Some radio stations refused to play this singer’s signature hit because of the suggestive lyric "I'd do anything for you/Anything you'd want me to.” (Ah, the 1950s.)
TERESA BREWER

40. Her father was a pioneering jet pilot and head of the Federal Aviation Administration under Presidents Kennedy and Johnson; her husband held an even more exalted position.

41. This director made his mark in Hollywood with a series of classic horror films as well as one of the quintessential examples of film noir. (He also helmed an episode of The Twilight Zone starring an actor in one of the preceding clues.

42. This emperor founded the dynasty that ruled much of the Indian subcontinent from 1526 to 1857.

43. From 1964 until her death in 1981, she published dozens of volumes of inspirational and Christian verse, but most of us know her best from greeting cards.

44. In 1947, a nation mourned when this sports hero died after an injury to his upper right leg – though the real cause of death was probably a botched blood transfusion.

45. Known as the “Bentham of Hallamshire,” this British philosopher is best known for his 1821 Essays on the Formation and Publication of Opinions.

46. His best-selling 1966 critique of a government commission fueled the most persistent conspiracy theory in American history.
OTTO KERNER?

47. His eminence in his field began in 1742 when he published A Short Treatise on the Game of Whist.
EDMOND HOYLE

48. A member of the National Cartoonist Society Hall of Fame, he was one of the chief artists for Archie comics for four decades and helped design the original color schemes for Spider-Man and the Fantastic Four.

49. He completes a list that also includes Guy Burgess, Donald Maclean, John Cairncross, and Anthony Blunt.

50. This entrepreneur and innovator came to international prominence in 1962 when he took on the Devil’s Cigarette Lighter.

51. She received a Razzie for Worst Supporting Actress for her portrayal of the daughter of a real-life movie star and an Emmy for Best Supporting Actress for her portrayal of the wife of a real-life U.S. President.

52. This animated icon was inspired by a bombastic character on Fred Allen’s radio show.
FOGHORN LEGHORN

53. Two of her eight Grammy nominations were for her featured performance on a hit song by the group Fun.

54. This Italian writer’s masterpiece – a novel in which two young lovers are separated by the machinations of an evil nobleman – was regarded as a veiled attack on the Austrian empire.

55. This legendary coach was an inaugural member of both the College Football Hall of Fame and the Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame.
POP WARNER?

56. He was the nation’s longest-serving Secretary of the Interior.

57. Committing suicide at the age of 41, this chemist never became aware of the lasting importance of his own work.

58. This self-help and finance guru rejects the term “psychic,” preferring to call herself an “intuitionist.”

59. This powerful Pope and ecclesiastical reformer organized the Fourth Crusade – and subsequently excommunicated the Crusaders when they sacked Constantinople against his wishes.

60. There is no evidence that this military commander ever actually said anything about a “sleeping giant,” but it’s a cool quote anyway.
YAMAMOTO

61. The peak of her film career came with a 1950 comeback that was also something of a farewell – she made only three more screen appearances over the next 33 years.
GLORIA SWANSON

62. Works by this American historian included biographies of an American President, an American general, a British prime minister, the “Sage of Baltimore,” and two prominent industrial dynasties – one American and one German.

63. According to one biographer, a dinner invitation to her home on the Rue Saint-Honoré was “considered almost as great an honor as being presented at Versailles.”

64. His severe hearing loss has been traced to such causes as his proximity to an exploding drum set and his participation in what the Guinness Book of World Records dubbed the “Loudest Concert Ever.”
PETE TOWNSHEND

65. During his Surrealist period, this German artist developed a graphic technique called frottage which involved the use of pencil or pastel rubbings to create original works of art.

66. This American physicist was co-winner of the Nobel Prize for his discovery of the antiproton.

67. This golfer was the oldest person ever to win a major championship.
PHIL MICKELSON

68. Elizabethan lyrics often include extravagant compliments to fair ladies, but it’s hard to top this poet’s claim that “There is a garden in her face/Where roses and white lilies blow….”

69. This eponymous hero of a Pulitzer Prize-winning novel leaves his practice in a small North Dakota town to fight bubonic plague in the Caribbean.
ARROWSMITH

70. This Greek statesman – who made a noble but fruitless effort to rouse Athens to the threat posed by Philip of Macedon – eventually committed suicide to avoid being arrested by Philip’s son and successor, Alexander.

71. The agency he founded in 1850 continues to operate, though it is now a subsidiary of a Swedish company specializing in “corporate risk management.”
ALLAN PINKERTON

72. Shortly after he and his sons opened their winery in 1966, he coined the term “"Fumé Blanc" to describe his version of Sauvignon blanc.
GALLO?

73. The way he wore a tool belt contributed to his being named one of the sexiest men on television by People magazine.

74. In 1916, he was assassinated by a group of conservative noblemen – but it wasn’t easy.
RASPUTIN

75. She had 5 Top Twenty hits in the 1960s, in support of a singer who had 20 other Top Twenty hits without her.
DARLENE LOVE? TAMMI TERRELL (Pretty sure it's Terrell)

76. In his eulogy for this novelist, Anatole France famously declared, “He was a moment in the conscience of Man.”

77. In addition to their individual careers – one as a novelist, the other as a record producer – these brothers are social media pioneers, having launched their influential joint vlog as early as 2009.

78. This pitcher played his first professional baseball game in 1926 and his last in 1965.
SATCHEL PAIGE

79. In 1942, this American physicist patented a ‘dry’ process that combined electrostatic printing with photography.

80. The only surviving work by this ancient philosopher is a long poem on Epicureanism that also played a major role in the development of the theory of atomism.

81. This prolific Soviet serial killer racked up at least 52 victims between 1978 and 1990.

82. As White House press secretary, he once declared, “The standard for any type of interrogation of somebody in American custody is to be humane and to follow all international laws and accords dealing with this type subject. That is precisely what has been happening and exactly what will happen" – and if you ask him now, he’ll tell you he stands by that statement.

83. This First Lady largely had Mark Twain to thank for the income that sustained her after her husband’s death.
JULIA GRANT

84. DJMQ: They are strongly associated with bunnies, foxes, and turkeys.

85. His stated goal was to “found an institution where any person can find instruction in any study” – at least that’s what it says on my class ring.

86. In 1966, he graduated first in his class at the medical college that bears the name of the man in the previous clue.

87. On July 14, 1973, he smashed his guitar and walked offstage in the middle of a concert, leaving his brother to finish by himself.
ONE OF THE EVERLYS?

88. He was the first African named Man of the Year by Time magazine.

89. Sent by Spain to suppress an insurrection, this general instituted policies that led to his being dubbed “the Butcher” – and helped spark a major U.S. war.

90. The shortest distance from Mozart to Lord Byron is via this randy dude.

91. Claiming that he “had no childhood,” this playwright described his only full-length comedy as an idealized picture of the childhood he wished he had.
WILLIAM SAROYAN? EUGENE O'NEILL?

92. This Panamian-born stage director is considered the definitive interpreter of the playwright cited in the previous clue.

93. His skillful stick handling earned this centre a Calder Memorial Trophy, a spot on nine All Star teams, and a place in the NHL Hall of Fame; his sportsmanship earned him a Lady Byng Trophy in the 1970s.
BOBBY CLARKE?

94. In 1878, he published a set of cabinet cards that answered the question of how horses actually gallop.

95. In 2003, India’s highest adventure-sports award was renamed in honor of this man who had made worldwide headlines fifty years earlier.
TENZING NORGAY? EDMUND HILLARY?

96. "It slices! It dices!" “Set it and forget it!” …. “But wait! There’s more!”
RON POPEIL

97. He is still an active activist more than half a century after penning the best-selling nonfiction book of 1966.
RALPH NADER?

98. His more benign works, such as “Heaven Is a World of Love,” were far less influential than the 1741 sermon in which he declared, "There is nothing that keeps wicked men at any one moment out of hell, but the mere pleasure of God."
JONATHAN EDWARDS

99. This lyricist – and occasional composer – won four Oscars for Best Original Song, a record he shares Sammy Kahn, Jimmy Van Heusen, and Alan Menken.
JOHNNY MERCER

100. This journalist’s most celebrated exploit was inspired by a novel by Jules Verne.
NELLIE BLY

101. When this American jockey retired in 1959, he held the record for most career wins with 6,032.
EDDIE ARCARO

102. This actor received one Oscar nomination for playing a title role that had previously earned a nomination for another actor, and another nomination for playing that actor. Got that?

103. This American physicist won the Nobel Prize "for his discoveries concerning the fine structure of the hydrogen spectrum."

104. After fleeing to Holland to escape persecution of Huguenots, this philosopher published his magnum opus, a four-volume biographical dictionary that would influence such Enlightenment thinkers as Denis Diderot.

105. Works by this Italian Jewish polymath include an account of his year as a prisoner in Auschwitz and a collection of short stories which the Royal Institution of Great Britain named the best science book ever written.

106. He became nationally known after the untimely passing of Mr. Kachellek, Mr. Heyer, Mr. Schwimmer, Mr. Weinshank, Mr. May, and the brothers Gusenberg.

107. This Democrat was appointed by Republican Herbert Hoover to succeed the Great Dissenter on the Supreme Court, where he became a stalwart of the Court’s liberal wing.

108. A student of Balenciaga, this fashion designer created couture dresses for First Ladies from Jackie to Michelle, but died before he got to extend the list to Melania or Jill.

109. In 1961, this civil rights activist organized and led the first Freedom Ride.

110. This Confederate cavalry general first earned notoriety for his role in what became known as the Fort Pillow Massacre.
NATHAN BEDFORD FORREST

111. “His wits being quite gone, he hit upon the strangest notion that ever madman in this world hit upon.” And the world is better for it.

112. Some 54 years after the fellow in Clue #44, he also died as the result of an occupational hazard in his sport of choice.
DALE EARNHARDT

113. While his countryman was painting a mural in Rockefeller Center, this artist was painting an equally controversial mural at Dartmouth College – but his survived.

114. A colleague of Freud – whose publishing house he managed – this Austrian analyst devoted much of his career to studying the psychology of creativity.

115. The films of this director – known for his ensemble casts – covered a wide range of milieus, from country music to country houses.
ROBERT ALTMAN

116. No matter what one thinks of this novelist, “Isn’t it pretty to think so?” belongs on any list of the most poignant closing lines ever.

117. In 1923 – at the age of seven – this New York-born violinist made his debut as a soloist with the San Francisco symphony; by age 12, he had made his first recordings; and at the age of 83, he made his last recording … and died.

118. The nine-year-old boy whose life he famously saved in 1885 eventually became the caretaker of the Institute that bore his name.

119. This industrialist wrote, “The man who dies leaving behind him millions of available wealth which was his to administer during life, will pass away unwept, unhonoured and unsung. no matter to what uses he leaves the dross which he cannot take with him. Of such as these the public verdict will then be: The man who dies thus rich dies disgraced."
ANDREW CARNEGIE

120. Collateral effects of this ruler’s career includes the expansion of the United States and a better understanding of early Egyptian history.
SANTA ANNA? or maybe NAPOLEON?

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Re: Game #206: Dissociation

#23 Post by mellytu74 » Thu Jul 22, 2021 11:30 am

13. This Shakespearean character’s musings on the futility of human existence would – more than three centuries later – provide the title for one of the Great American Novels.

HAMLET

I thought Melly said it was The Sound and the fury, which would make it from MACBETH's soliloquy.

Definitely MACBETH's soliloquy.

Tomorrow, and tomorrow, and tomorrow,
Creeps in this petty pace from day to day
To the last syllable of recorded time,
And all our yesterdays have lighted fools
The way to dusty death. Out, out, brief candle!
Life's but a walking shadow, a poor player
That struts and frets his hour upon the stage
And then is heard no more: it is a tale
Told by an idiot, full of sound and fury,
Signifying nothing.

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Re: Game #206: Dissociation

#24 Post by mellytu74 » Thu Jul 22, 2021 11:33 am

118. The nine-year-old boy whose life he famously saved in 1885 eventually became the caretaker of the Institute that bore his name.

LOUIS PASTEUR.

Dickie Moore played the little boy in the movie.

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Re: Game #206: Dissociation

#25 Post by mellytu74 » Thu Jul 22, 2021 11:41 am

Working backward ....

92. This Panamian-born stage director is considered the definitive interpreter of the playwright cited in the previous clue.

This is likely JOSE QUINTERO

Which makes THIS

91. Claiming that he “had no childhood,” this playwright described his only full-length comedy as an idealized picture of the childhood he wished he had.

EUGENE O'NEILL and Ah, Wilderness

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