Game #201: Zero-Sum Game

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mellytu74
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Re: Game #201: Zero-Sum Game

#26 Post by mellytu74 » Thu Jul 09, 2020 1:31 pm

littlebeast13 wrote:
Thu Jul 09, 2020 11:31 am
I haven't been much help in the last few games... but with not much else to do, I have been tracking the progress of this game looking for anything that might go together. With five-part matches, we're probably going to have to look for pieces of the Tangredi before we can figure out the whole thing. I've been focusing on the first and last names, since they are expressly important in this game, and have been free associating with some of the associated words. I haven't had a whole lot of luck, but a couple of things stuck out to me....

The word "Stooge" almost has to link to one of the men who were a part of The Three Stooges, of which there were only six, and half of them shared the surname Howard... of which there happens to be a Howard (Carter) in the puzzle.

I also scanned past "French Revolution" in the puzzle shortly after reading the comments about Pope Benedict, and realized that he was XVI, just like France's king at the time, Louis XVI.

It's possible I'm spewing rubbish again, but just in case it sparks something for someone else...... there it is.

lb13
Coupled with Kroxquo's Lin Manuel Miranda post, there may be something here.

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Re: Game #201: Zero-Sum Game

#27 Post by kroxquo » Thu Jul 09, 2020 1:39 pm

littlebeast13 wrote:
Thu Jul 09, 2020 11:31 am
I haven't been much help in the last few games... but with not much else to do, I have been tracking the progress of this game looking for anything that might go together. With five-part matches, we're probably going to have to look for pieces of the Tangredi before we can figure out the whole thing. I've been focusing on the first and last names, since they are expressly important in this game, and have been free associating with some of the associated words. I haven't had a whole lot of luck, but a couple of things stuck out to me....

The word "Stooge" almost has to link to one of the men who were a part of The Three Stooges, of which there were only six, and half of them shared the surname Howard... of which there happens to be a Howard (Carter) in the puzzle.

I also scanned past "French Revolution" in the puzzle shortly after reading the comments about Pope Benedict, and realized that he was XVI, just like France's king at the time, Louis XVI.

It's possible I'm spewing rubbish again, but just in case it sparks something for someone else...... there it is.

lb13
If there is a Howard for a stooge, then that would be another first/last name like I mentioned earlier. The last names that could be used as first names:
Bruce WAYNE
John Francis REGIS
Minnie PEARL
George MEREDITH (Regis & Meredith - Is Millionaire on the list of words?)
Ponce de LEON
Pope BENEDICT
Ethan ALLAN
Carl ALBERT
Maya LIN
James OTIS
MARTHA
Horatio NELSON

Given my record of figuring out Tangredis, this all probably means absolutely nothing, but I'm throwing it out there.
You live and learn. Or at least you live. - Douglas Adams

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Re: Game #201: Zero-Sum Game

#28 Post by mellytu74 » Thu Jul 09, 2020 6:46 pm

91. During her tenure as the president of the National Organization for Women, she pressed for collegiate sports to be included under Title IX, but she drew fire from some NOW members for her support for fathers’ rights in custody cases.

I think this is Karen DeCrow.

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Re: Game #201: Zero-Sum Game

#29 Post by silverscreenselect » Thu Jul 09, 2020 9:55 pm

kroxquo wrote:
Wed Jul 08, 2020 9:28 pm
5. She has been acting long enough to have appeared on screen with both Clark Gable and Daniel Day Lewis.
Sophia Loren


29. Between 1949 and 1976, this pseudonymous author wrote 18 novels about a hard-boiled detective in the suburbs of Los Angeles.
Ross MacDonald

96. He has been nominated for eleven Oscars in six different categories – winning twice for Best Director, once for Best Film Editing, and once for Best Cinematography.
Alfonso Cuaron
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Re: Game #201: Zero-Sum Game

#30 Post by silverscreenselect » Thu Jul 09, 2020 10:27 pm

One of the associated words that jumped out at me was Bourgeoisie. The only use of that word I know of is the movie title The Discreet Charm of the Bourgeoisie, which starred Fernando Rey. We've got a Fernando Botero in the puzzle, and you can probably find the letters "rey" hidden inside somebody else's name. Beverly Cleary could yield "lear" which could combine with Norman Schwarzkopf.

Maybe nothing, maybe something.
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Re: Game #201: Zero-Sum Game

#31 Post by mrkelley23 » Fri Jul 10, 2020 8:57 am

85. is EDVARD GRIEG, who wrote the Peer Gynt Suite to supplement Ibsen's play.

88. is probably the name Frank said would have to be Anglicized. Masseria was known as "Joe the Boss."

95. is probably the one that is incomplete. The man's correct name is Julius Nyerere.

Bourgeoisie could be in there for Rey, of course, but also for Luis Bunuel (who wrote and directed the film), and also Marx and Engels, since this isn't strictly a movie game.

You can, however, get both Rey and Rene if you anagram Julius Nyerere's last name. Since Frank hinted that the correct spelling is necessary, that's where I'm leaning.
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Re: Game #201: Zero-Sum Game

#32 Post by mrkelley23 » Sun Jul 12, 2020 5:03 pm

93. is probably DAVID TOMS, although I think the clue should refer to the PGA Championship, rather than the Players.

92. is HELEN TAUSSIG

89. is STANLEY MILGRAM

87. is FERNAND LEGER

79. is CHARLES SANDERS PEIRCE
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Re: Game #201: Zero-Sum Game

#33 Post by mrkelley23 » Sun Jul 12, 2020 5:41 pm

The three single question marks that are incorrect are 2. which should be VIRGINIA WOOLF; 19. which should be MICHELLE BACHELET; and 94. which should be ROBINSON CRUSOE. That means the other single question marks are are correct.
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Re: Game #201: Zero-Sum Game

#34 Post by mrkelley23 » Sun Jul 12, 2020 5:54 pm

12. is JOHNNY RINGO

49. is TED ARISON

22. is JULIAN HUXLEY

33. is DAVID AYRES
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Re: Game #201: Zero-Sum Game

#35 Post by littlebeast13 » Tue Jul 14, 2020 11:42 am

Updated Consolidation. Removed the "?" from all single answers in the last consolidation...


Identify the 100 people in the clues below. Match them into 40 groups of three according to a Tangredi, or principle you must discover for yourself. Then match each threesome with two of the Associated Words.

20 names will be used twice – once for their first name, once for their last name. Alternate matches are possible, but only one solution will allow all the game to be completed.

1. He served the exact same length of time as President of the United States and as Vice President of the United States.
MARTIN VAN BUREN

2. This author’s most famous novel begins with the title character deciding to go out and buy some flowers.
VIRGINIA WOOLF

3. The name of the artistic movement with which this painter is most associated derived from a canvas he exhibited in April 1874.
Paul Renoir? Edgar Degas? Claude Monet?

4. In a book published in 1789, this philosopher wrote, ““Nature has placed mankind under the governance of two sovereign masters, pain and pleasure. It is for them alone to point out what we ought to do, as well as to determine what we shall do.”
MARQUIS DE SADE

5. She has been acting long enough to have appeared on screen with both Clark Gable and Daniel Day Lewis.
SOPHIA LOREN

6. Six years after being named NFL Comeback Player of the Year, this quarterback led his team to their only Super Bowl win.
DREW BREES

7. Unlike the physicist in my last general knowledge game, this physicist really DID win the Nobel Prize for inventing the bubble chamber.
DONALD GLASER

8. DJMQ (whether she is the one to answer it or not):
One of this choreographer’s most notable works was a reimagined Nutcracker which used Tchaikovsky’s score but scrapped the entire story in favor of a new one about a boy’s relationship with his mother and his bizarre sexual fantasies.
Another DJMQ appears at #75

9. First appearing in May 1939, his name was derived from a medieval Scottish king and a Revolutionary War general.
BRUCE WAYNE

10. Prior to joining a Seattle-based rock band in 1997, he served as the tour drummer for Alanis Morissette.
TAYLOR HAWKINS

11. When he died this year at the age of 89, this minister was the last surviving founder of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference.
JOSEPH LOWERY

12. When this legendary Wild West outlaw was found shot through the head, suspects included Wyatt Earp and Doc Holliday – but Ben Cartwright was not involved in any way.
JOHNNY RINGO

13. Best known for his work with “fallen women” and orphans, this 17th century French Jesuit is the patron saint of lacemakers, medical social workers, and illegitimate children.
JOHN FRANCIS REGIS

14. Students of this influential anthropologist included Ruth Benedict, Zora Neale Hurston, and Margaret Mead.
FRANZ BOAS

15. Known as the “Mouth of Mississippi,” this comedian was a regular at the Grand Ole Opry for a quarter of a century.
MINNIE PEARL

16. This Victorian writer is best known for a comic novel about a self-centered peer and a collection of 50 sonnets about the failure of his first marriage.
GEORGE MEREDITH

17. The bicycle manufacturing firm that he founded in the 1880s eventually evolved into France’s largest automotive company.
Renault? Citroen? Peugeot?

18. She was the only American skater to win a gold medal at the Albertville Olympiad.
KRISTI YAMAGUCHI

19. In 1975, she was exiled from her South American homeland; three decades later, she began her first term as its president.
MICHELLE BACHELET

20. A specialist in women’s ready-to-wear fashion, he has also designed for three of the last four First Ladies, including the black sleeveless dress that Michelle Obama wore in her first official portrait.
MICHAEL KORS

21. The son of an even more prominent classical pianist, he won a Grammy for Most Promising New Classical Recording Artist of 1966.
PETER SERKIN

22. The grandson of an even more prominent evolutionary biologist, he served as the first director of UNESCO and was a founding member of the World Wildlife Fund.
JULIAN HUXLEY

23. He authored the best-selling non-fiction book of 1966, the first chapter of which was titled “The Sporty Corvair.”
RALPH NADER

24. Whenever this First Lady had an epileptic seizure, her husband would gently place a handkerchief over her face until it passed.
IDA MCKINLEY

25. He set his naval record with the aid of a 7.62 NATO Mk11, a 5.56 NATO Mk12, a .300 Magnum M24, and a .338 Lapua Magnum.

26. An economist with the Brookings Institute, in 2014 she became the first woman to hold a very powerful position.
JANET YELLIN

27. This Colombian artist is best known for his comically exaggerated paintings and sculptures of what he called his “fat figures.”
FERNANDO BOTERO

28. This explorer gave what became the 27th state to enter the Union its name.
PONCE DE LEON

29. Between 1949 and 1976, this pseudonymous author wrote 18 novels about a hard-boiled detective in the suburbs of Los Angeles.
ROSS MACDONALD

30. This specialist in crusty character roles was the earliest-born person ever nominated for an acting Oscar.
MAY ROBSON

31. This entrepreneur expanded his family’s Connecticut bagel bakery into a national brand.
MURRAY LENDER

32. He was preceded in two of his current Congressional positions by Nancy Pelosi and Paul Ryan.
KEVIN MCCARTHY

33. Earlier this year, he became the first emergency backup goaltender in NHL history to record a win.
DAVID AYRES

34. This 20th century German American philosopher wrote influential works on many subjects, including bioethics, technology, and the history of Gnosticism.

35. He did not invent what many people think he invented, but the single-wire version he developed quickly superseded all earlier versions.
SAMUEL MORSE

36. This member of the Country Music Hall of Fame – who died in a plane crash in 1964 – is reportedly the most popular English-language singer in Sri Lanka. (Sri Lanka?)
JIM REEVES

37. He is the most prominent resident of the Mater Ecclesiae Monastery.
POPE BENEDICT XVI

38. This nurse and “baby farmer” was hanged in 1896 for murdering an infant in her care, but the actual number may have been more than 400 – making her a leading candidate for England’s most prolific serial killer.
AMELIA DYER

39. This “peak performance coach” released the first of his infomercials in 1988.

40. He and his militia are best known for carrying out the bloodless capture of an enemy stronghold in the wee hours of May 10, 1775.
ETHAN ALLEN

41. The inaugural production of the Group Theatre was this North Carolina playwright’s tale of the decline of an aristocratic southern family.
PAUL GREEN

42. In between his eleven(!) marriages, this jazz saxophonist and bandleader found time to record hit versions of songs such as “Cherokee” and “Skyliner.”
CHARLIE BARNET

43. One of the fathers of modern surgery, he served as barber-surgeon to four kings of France.

44. In addition to his busy film career, this actor/writer/director has also founded a cannabis company. (Is anyone surprised?)
Tommy Chong? Cheech Marin? Woody Harrelson?

45. If it had not been for the passage of the Twenty-fifth Amendment, this congressman would have succeeded to the Presidency on August 9, 1974.
CARL ALBERT

46. His big brother beat him out of the womb by four minutes in 1957 and down the slopes by 0.21 seconds in 1984.
STEVE MAHRE

47. In 1934, she had the honor of being the first American journalist expelled from Nazi Germany.
DOROTHY THOMPSON

48. He made his first appearance on radio on April 26, 1952 and his final appearance (not counting reruns) on television on March 31, 1975.
MATT DILLON

49. In 1972, he founded what is today the world’s largest cruise line in terms of both fleet size and passengers carried.
TED ARISON

50. In 1824, this textile manufacturer sailed from Scotland to America to set up his first experimental community, which he hoped would become a model for a new way of organizing society. (It didn’t.)

51. This artist’s second best-known work was commissioned by the Southern Poverty Law Center and commemorates 41 people who were killed between 1954 and 1968.
MAYA LIN

52. In 1887 this British historian famously said, “"Power tends to corrupt, and absolute power corrupts absolutely. Great men are almost always bad men.”
LORD ACTON

53. Though most closely associated with one particular lyricist/playwright, this composer also wrote musicals in collaboration with Ira Gershwin, Langston Hughes, Maxwell Anderson, Alan Jay Lerner, Ogden Nash, and the writer in Clue # 41.
KURT WEILL

54. He’s a fake and he doesn’t know the territory!
PROFESSOR HAROLD HILL

55. This popular American author celebrated her 104th birthday in April.
BEVERLY CLEARY

56. He was a number one NBA draft pick, but ended up playing only 105 games in three seasons.
GREG ODEN

57. He starred in one of the scariest episodes of the original Twilight Zone, though he basically just slept through the whole thing.
RICHARD CONTE

58. This American physicist and his thesis adviser shared the Nobel Prize for their discovery of a new type of pulsar.

59. When this legislator and pamphleteer coined the phrase “Taxation without representation is tyranny,” he little imagined that he would later be plagued by mental illness exacerbated by a blow on the head from a tax collector.
JAMES OTIS

60. “Lord, don’t you care that my sister has left me to do the work by myself?” she complained. “Tell her to help me!" (He didn’t.)
MARTHA

61. A protegee of Martha Stewart, she went from the White House OMB to her own cooking show on the Food Network.
INA GARTEN

62. In 1869, this entrepreneur purchased a small company in Hastings-on-Hudson, New York; the following year, he accepted an offer to relocate to Akron, Ohio – and the rest is history.
Charles Goodyear? BF Goodrich?

63. This French political philosopher helped establish the theoretical foundations of absolutism with his 1576 treatise Six Books of the Republic.

64. It was during his last and greatest battle that he sent what became the classic message, “England expects that every man will do his duty.”
HORATIO NELSON

65. I can’t swear that he was the only cartoonist whose work helped apprehend a crook, but no cartoonist ever helped apprehend a bigger one.
THOMAS NAST

66. This astronomer formulated the theory of stellar nucleosynthesis, but the theory he is most known for naming is one that he himself rejected.
FRED HOYLE

67. At the age of 64, this swimmer became the first person to swim from Cuba to Florida without a shark cage
DIANA NYAD

68. It was on November 26, 1922, that he first espied those “wonderful things.”
HOAWRD CARTER

69. Citing a breach of confidentiality, Mineko Iwasaki brought a lawsuit against this novelist over his 1997 best-seller.

70. He is currently third in the line of Presidential succession.
CHUCK GRASSLEY

71. She was the oldest actor ever nominated for an Oscar for a leading role.
EMMANUELLE RIVA

72. While serving a six-month prison sentence for his involvement in the Pullman Strike, he became a committed socialist and would go on to cofound the Socialist Party of America and the IWW.
EUGENE DEBS

73. Appropriately, he had the lowest vocal range in the boy band he joined while he was a junior in high school – a gig he almost lost because he wasn’t much of a dancer.
LANCE BASS

74. A fellow contestant on a popular game show in 1978 called him “a very strange guy,” while the young lady who subsequently refused to go out with him found him “creepy.” Good call.
RODNEY ALCALA

75. DJMQ: This Cincinnati-born ballerina was a “muse” of George Balanchine, who choreographed the role of Dulcinea in his 1965 version of Don Quixote especially for her.

76. She once wrote, “Good manners have much to do with the emotions. To make them ring true, one must feel them, not merely exhibit them.”
AMY VANDERBILT

77. She was the first American woman to walk in space.

78. This physicist won the Nobel Prize for his invention of holography.
DENNIS GABOR

79. One of the founders of pragmatism, he was once called “America's greatest logician.”
CHARLES SANDERS PEIRCE

80. This pitcher’s two wins helped Cleveland take its first World Series trophy in 28 years.
BOB LEMON

81. He and his partner were two of the biggest stars in vaudeville in the decades before and after World War I, but his nephews reached even greater comedy heights.
AL SHEAN

82. Currently Senior National Correspondent for ABC, this journalist’s previous gigs have included stints as Chief White House Correspondent, co-anchor of a late-night news program, and reporter for Court TV.
TERRY MORAN

83. I’m sure she’s not the only woman who met her second husband on a blind date in 2016 and married him on May 19, 2018 – but she’s certainly the one best known for doing so.
MEGHAN MARKLE

84. The only Senators to vote against the confirmation of this Supreme Court justice were Don Nickles of Oklahoma, Jesse Helms of North Carolina, and Bob Smith of New Hampshire.
RUTH BADER GINSBURG

85. His nation’s greatest (arguably) composer, his greatest (arguably) work was the incidental music he wrote for an 1867 play by his nation’s greatest (arguably) dramatist.
EDVARD GRIEG

86. His 1893 novel about a tenement girl who descends into prostitution is considered the first work of American literary naturalism.
STEPHEN CRANE

87. This French artist developed a personal form of cubism derisively dubbed “tubism” due to its emphasis on cylindrical shapes.
FERNAND LEGER

88. Head of the Genovese crime family during most of the Prohibition era, he was eventually assassinated on the orders of his own lieutenant, Lucky Luciano.
JOE "THE BOSS" (Giuseppe) MASSERIA

89. The famous – or infamous – experiments conducted by this American psychologist were largely inspired by the trial of Adolf Eichmann.
STANLEY MILGRAM

90. During military exercises, this general wrote up a scenario on how to respond to respond to a regional dictator invading a neighboring country and seizing its oilfields; a month later, he got to put it into practice.
NORMAN SCHWARZKOPF

91. During her tenure as the president of the National Organization for Women, she pressed for collegiate sports to be included under Title IX, but she drew fire from some NOW members for her support for fathers’ rights in custody cases.
KAREN DECROW?

92. The first woman elected head of the American Heart Association, she is credited with developing the field of pediatric cardiology.
HELEN TAUSSIG

93. From 1996 to 2008, this American golfer amassed twelve wins on the PGA tour, but his only Major win was in the Players Championship.
DAVID TOMS?

94. According to the opening lines of the eponymous novel he narrates, he “was born in the Year 1632, in the City of York, of a good Family, tho' not of that Country, my Father being a Foreigner of Bremen, who settled first at Hull.”
ROBINSON CRUSOE

95. In 1964, when the country headed by this African nationalist merged with another newly independent state, he became first president of the renamed successor state – a position he held for the next 21 years.
JULIUS NYERERE

96. He has been nominated for eleven Oscars in six different categories – winning twice for Best Director, once for Best Film Editing, and once for Best Cinematography.
ALFONSO CUARON

97. After graduating near the top of his class at Yale Law School in 1955, he failed the New York bar exam – beginning a period of unemployment and depression that led to his becoming a born-again Christian.
PAT ROBERTSON

98. Spanish soprano Montserrat Caballe said of this rock vocalist – with whom she recorded an album – that “he sang with an incisive sense of rhythm, his vocal placement was very good and he was able to glide effortlessly from a register to another. He also had a great musicality. His phrasing was subtle, delicate and sweet or energetic and slamming. He was able to find the right coloring or expressive nuance for each word.
FREDDIE MERCURY

99. This tycoon was enormously influential, but historians now regard his claim of having personally started a war as greatly exaggerated.
WILLIAM RANDOLPH HEARST

100. His quintessential poem contains such memorable lines as “For every atom belonging to me as good belongs to you" and “In all people I see myself, none more and not one a barleycorn less.”
WALT WHITMAN


ASSOCIATED WORDS
Kane
Rockefeller
Nash
Simpson
Eames
Lupo
Rosanne
Bette
Rachel
Bernie
Gordon
Gidget
Hazel
Peter
Joy
Emma
Georgia
Arizona
Illinois
Vermont
South Dakota
Minnesota
Cleveland
Seattle
Austria
Liberia
Hong Kong
Moon
Delta
Prairie
Pool
Battlefield
Civil War
French Revolution
Stooge
Big Mouth
Attorney
Inspector
Cook
Gigolo
Pilgrim
Bourgeoisie
Cubist
Predator
Horse
Foxes
Cub
Shark
Dolphin
Possum
Climate
Snow
Rain
Spring
Afternoon
Philanthropy
Fashion
Treasury
Commerce
Airplane
Automobile
Wheel
Box
Skylight
Needles
Rags
Net
Boot
Club
Petroleum
RNA
Pizza
Ribs
Fatty
Radioactive
Invisible
Incomplete
Escape
Rescue
Crying
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Re: Game #201: Zero-Sum Game

#36 Post by Vandal » Tue Jul 14, 2020 11:53 am

74. A fellow contestant on a popular game show in 1978 called him “a very strange guy,” while the young lady who subsequently refused to go out with him found him “creepy.” Good call.
Ted Bundy? Rodney Alcala?

Definitely Alcala. He almost made the cut in the recent Timeline Serial Killers chron.
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Re: Game #201: Zero-Sum Game

#37 Post by littlebeast13 » Tue Jul 14, 2020 12:03 pm

Vandal wrote:
Tue Jul 14, 2020 11:53 am
74. A fellow contestant on a popular game show in 1978 called him “a very strange guy,” while the young lady who subsequently refused to go out with him found him “creepy.” Good call.
Ted Bundy? Rodney Alcala?

Definitely Alcala. He almost made the cut in the recent Timeline Serial Killers chron.
Added to the consolidation.

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Re: Game #201: Zero-Sum Game

#38 Post by franktangredi » Tue Jul 14, 2020 12:15 pm

Two of the definite answers are wrong. There's nothing ambiguous about it. (Are you ready for me to tell you which ones?) One of them is correct but incomplete; what's listed seems like a full name, but it's actually missing the person's first name.

Of the two with question marks, one is right and one is wrong.

Of those with alternate answers, only one does not include the correct answer.
littlebeast13 wrote:
Tue Jul 14, 2020 11:42 am
Updated Consolidation. Removed the "?" from all single answers in the last consolidation...


Identify the 100 people in the clues below. Match them into 40 groups of three according to a Tangredi, or principle you must discover for yourself. Then match each threesome with two of the Associated Words.

20 names will be used twice – once for their first name, once for their last name. Alternate matches are possible, but only one solution will allow all the game to be completed.

1. He served the exact same length of time as President of the United States and as Vice President of the United States.
MARTIN VAN BUREN

2. This author’s most famous novel begins with the title character deciding to go out and buy some flowers.
VIRGINIA WOOLF

3. The name of the artistic movement with which this painter is most associated derived from a canvas he exhibited in April 1874.
Paul Renoir? Edgar Degas? Claude Monet?

4. In a book published in 1789, this philosopher wrote, ““Nature has placed mankind under the governance of two sovereign masters, pain and pleasure. It is for them alone to point out what we ought to do, as well as to determine what we shall do.”
MARQUIS DE SADE

5. She has been acting long enough to have appeared on screen with both Clark Gable and Daniel Day Lewis.
SOPHIA LOREN

6. Six years after being named NFL Comeback Player of the Year, this quarterback led his team to their only Super Bowl win.
DREW BREES

7. Unlike the physicist in my last general knowledge game, this physicist really DID win the Nobel Prize for inventing the bubble chamber.
DONALD GLASER

8. DJMQ (whether she is the one to answer it or not):
One of this choreographer’s most notable works was a reimagined Nutcracker which used Tchaikovsky’s score but scrapped the entire story in favor of a new one about a boy’s relationship with his mother and his bizarre sexual fantasies.
Another DJMQ appears at #75

9. First appearing in May 1939, his name was derived from a medieval Scottish king and a Revolutionary War general.
BRUCE WAYNE

10. Prior to joining a Seattle-based rock band in 1997, he served as the tour drummer for Alanis Morissette.
TAYLOR HAWKINS

11. When he died this year at the age of 89, this minister was the last surviving founder of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference.
JOSEPH LOWERY

12. When this legendary Wild West outlaw was found shot through the head, suspects included Wyatt Earp and Doc Holliday – but Ben Cartwright was not involved in any way.
JOHNNY RINGO

13. Best known for his work with “fallen women” and orphans, this 17th century French Jesuit is the patron saint of lacemakers, medical social workers, and illegitimate children.
JOHN FRANCIS REGIS

14. Students of this influential anthropologist included Ruth Benedict, Zora Neale Hurston, and Margaret Mead.
FRANZ BOAS

15. Known as the “Mouth of Mississippi,” this comedian was a regular at the Grand Ole Opry for a quarter of a century.
MINNIE PEARL

16. This Victorian writer is best known for a comic novel about a self-centered peer and a collection of 50 sonnets about the failure of his first marriage.
GEORGE MEREDITH

17. The bicycle manufacturing firm that he founded in the 1880s eventually evolved into France’s largest automotive company.
Renault? Citroen? Peugeot?

18. She was the only American skater to win a gold medal at the Albertville Olympiad.
KRISTI YAMAGUCHI

19. In 1975, she was exiled from her South American homeland; three decades later, she began her first term as its president.
MICHELLE BACHELET

20. A specialist in women’s ready-to-wear fashion, he has also designed for three of the last four First Ladies, including the black sleeveless dress that Michelle Obama wore in her first official portrait.
MICHAEL KORS

21. The son of an even more prominent classical pianist, he won a Grammy for Most Promising New Classical Recording Artist of 1966.
PETER SERKIN

22. The grandson of an even more prominent evolutionary biologist, he served as the first director of UNESCO and was a founding member of the World Wildlife Fund.
JULIAN HUXLEY

23. He authored the best-selling non-fiction book of 1966, the first chapter of which was titled “The Sporty Corvair.”
RALPH NADER

24. Whenever this First Lady had an epileptic seizure, her husband would gently place a handkerchief over her face until it passed.
IDA MCKINLEY

25. He set his naval record with the aid of a 7.62 NATO Mk11, a 5.56 NATO Mk12, a .300 Magnum M24, and a .338 Lapua Magnum.

26. An economist with the Brookings Institute, in 2014 she became the first woman to hold a very powerful position.
JANET YELLIN

27. This Colombian artist is best known for his comically exaggerated paintings and sculptures of what he called his “fat figures.”
FERNANDO BOTERO

28. This explorer gave what became the 27th state to enter the Union its name.
PONCE DE LEON

29. Between 1949 and 1976, this pseudonymous author wrote 18 novels about a hard-boiled detective in the suburbs of Los Angeles.
ROSS MACDONALD

30. This specialist in crusty character roles was the earliest-born person ever nominated for an acting Oscar.
MAY ROBSON

31. This entrepreneur expanded his family’s Connecticut bagel bakery into a national brand.
MURRAY LENDER

32. He was preceded in two of his current Congressional positions by Nancy Pelosi and Paul Ryan.
KEVIN MCCARTHY

33. Earlier this year, he became the first emergency backup goaltender in NHL history to record a win.
DAVID AYRES

34. This 20th century German American philosopher wrote influential works on many subjects, including bioethics, technology, and the history of Gnosticism.

35. He did not invent what many people think he invented, but the single-wire version he developed quickly superseded all earlier versions.
SAMUEL MORSE

36. This member of the Country Music Hall of Fame – who died in a plane crash in 1964 – is reportedly the most popular English-language singer in Sri Lanka. (Sri Lanka?)
JIM REEVES

37. He is the most prominent resident of the Mater Ecclesiae Monastery.
POPE BENEDICT XVI

38. This nurse and “baby farmer” was hanged in 1896 for murdering an infant in her care, but the actual number may have been more than 400 – making her a leading candidate for England’s most prolific serial killer.
AMELIA DYER

39. This “peak performance coach” released the first of his infomercials in 1988.

40. He and his militia are best known for carrying out the bloodless capture of an enemy stronghold in the wee hours of May 10, 1775.
ETHAN ALLEN

41. The inaugural production of the Group Theatre was this North Carolina playwright’s tale of the decline of an aristocratic southern family.
PAUL GREEN

42. In between his eleven(!) marriages, this jazz saxophonist and bandleader found time to record hit versions of songs such as “Cherokee” and “Skyliner.”
CHARLIE BARNET

43. One of the fathers of modern surgery, he served as barber-surgeon to four kings of France.

44. In addition to his busy film career, this actor/writer/director has also founded a cannabis company. (Is anyone surprised?)
Tommy Chong? Cheech Marin? Woody Harrelson?

45. If it had not been for the passage of the Twenty-fifth Amendment, this congressman would have succeeded to the Presidency on August 9, 1974.
CARL ALBERT

46. His big brother beat him out of the womb by four minutes in 1957 and down the slopes by 0.21 seconds in 1984.
STEVE MAHRE

47. In 1934, she had the honor of being the first American journalist expelled from Nazi Germany.
DOROTHY THOMPSON

48. He made his first appearance on radio on April 26, 1952 and his final appearance (not counting reruns) on television on March 31, 1975.
MATT DILLON

49. In 1972, he founded what is today the world’s largest cruise line in terms of both fleet size and passengers carried.
TED ARISON

50. In 1824, this textile manufacturer sailed from Scotland to America to set up his first experimental community, which he hoped would become a model for a new way of organizing society. (It didn’t.)

51. This artist’s second best-known work was commissioned by the Southern Poverty Law Center and commemorates 41 people who were killed between 1954 and 1968.
MAYA LIN

52. In 1887 this British historian famously said, “"Power tends to corrupt, and absolute power corrupts absolutely. Great men are almost always bad men.”
LORD ACTON

53. Though most closely associated with one particular lyricist/playwright, this composer also wrote musicals in collaboration with Ira Gershwin, Langston Hughes, Maxwell Anderson, Alan Jay Lerner, Ogden Nash, and the writer in Clue # 41.
KURT WEILL

54. He’s a fake and he doesn’t know the territory!
PROFESSOR HAROLD HILL

55. This popular American author celebrated her 104th birthday in April.
BEVERLY CLEARY

56. He was a number one NBA draft pick, but ended up playing only 105 games in three seasons.
GREG ODEN

57. He starred in one of the scariest episodes of the original Twilight Zone, though he basically just slept through the whole thing.
RICHARD CONTE

58. This American physicist and his thesis adviser shared the Nobel Prize for their discovery of a new type of pulsar.

59. When this legislator and pamphleteer coined the phrase “Taxation without representation is tyranny,” he little imagined that he would later be plagued by mental illness exacerbated by a blow on the head from a tax collector.
JAMES OTIS

60. “Lord, don’t you care that my sister has left me to do the work by myself?” she complained. “Tell her to help me!" (He didn’t.)
MARTHA

61. A protegee of Martha Stewart, she went from the White House OMB to her own cooking show on the Food Network.
INA GARTEN

62. In 1869, this entrepreneur purchased a small company in Hastings-on-Hudson, New York; the following year, he accepted an offer to relocate to Akron, Ohio – and the rest is history.
Charles Goodyear? BF Goodrich?

63. This French political philosopher helped establish the theoretical foundations of absolutism with his 1576 treatise Six Books of the Republic.

64. It was during his last and greatest battle that he sent what became the classic message, “England expects that every man will do his duty.”
HORATIO NELSON

65. I can’t swear that he was the only cartoonist whose work helped apprehend a crook, but no cartoonist ever helped apprehend a bigger one.
THOMAS NAST

66. This astronomer formulated the theory of stellar nucleosynthesis, but the theory he is most known for naming is one that he himself rejected.
FRED HOYLE

67. At the age of 64, this swimmer became the first person to swim from Cuba to Florida without a shark cage
DIANA NYAD

68. It was on November 26, 1922, that he first espied those “wonderful things.”
HOAWRD CARTER

69. Citing a breach of confidentiality, Mineko Iwasaki brought a lawsuit against this novelist over his 1997 best-seller.

70. He is currently third in the line of Presidential succession.
CHUCK GRASSLEY

71. She was the oldest actor ever nominated for an Oscar for a leading role.
EMMANUELLE RIVA

72. While serving a six-month prison sentence for his involvement in the Pullman Strike, he became a committed socialist and would go on to cofound the Socialist Party of America and the IWW.
EUGENE DEBS

73. Appropriately, he had the lowest vocal range in the boy band he joined while he was a junior in high school – a gig he almost lost because he wasn’t much of a dancer.
LANCE BASS

74. A fellow contestant on a popular game show in 1978 called him “a very strange guy,” while the young lady who subsequently refused to go out with him found him “creepy.” Good call.
RODNEY ALCALA

75. DJMQ: This Cincinnati-born ballerina was a “muse” of George Balanchine, who choreographed the role of Dulcinea in his 1965 version of Don Quixote especially for her.

76. She once wrote, “Good manners have much to do with the emotions. To make them ring true, one must feel them, not merely exhibit them.”
AMY VANDERBILT

77. She was the first American woman to walk in space.

78. This physicist won the Nobel Prize for his invention of holography.
DENNIS GABOR

79. One of the founders of pragmatism, he was once called “America's greatest logician.”
CHARLES SANDERS PEIRCE

80. This pitcher’s two wins helped Cleveland take its first World Series trophy in 28 years.
BOB LEMON

81. He and his partner were two of the biggest stars in vaudeville in the decades before and after World War I, but his nephews reached even greater comedy heights.
AL SHEAN

82. Currently Senior National Correspondent for ABC, this journalist’s previous gigs have included stints as Chief White House Correspondent, co-anchor of a late-night news program, and reporter for Court TV.
TERRY MORAN

83. I’m sure she’s not the only woman who met her second husband on a blind date in 2016 and married him on May 19, 2018 – but she’s certainly the one best known for doing so.
MEGHAN MARKLE

84. The only Senators to vote against the confirmation of this Supreme Court justice were Don Nickles of Oklahoma, Jesse Helms of North Carolina, and Bob Smith of New Hampshire.
RUTH BADER GINSBURG

85. His nation’s greatest (arguably) composer, his greatest (arguably) work was the incidental music he wrote for an 1867 play by his nation’s greatest (arguably) dramatist.
EDVARD GRIEG

86. His 1893 novel about a tenement girl who descends into prostitution is considered the first work of American literary naturalism.
STEPHEN CRANE

87. This French artist developed a personal form of cubism derisively dubbed “tubism” due to its emphasis on cylindrical shapes.
FERNAND LEGER

88. Head of the Genovese crime family during most of the Prohibition era, he was eventually assassinated on the orders of his own lieutenant, Lucky Luciano.
JOE "THE BOSS" (Giuseppe) MASSERIA

89. The famous – or infamous – experiments conducted by this American psychologist were largely inspired by the trial of Adolf Eichmann.
STANLEY MILGRAM

90. During military exercises, this general wrote up a scenario on how to respond to respond to a regional dictator invading a neighboring country and seizing its oilfields; a month later, he got to put it into practice.
NORMAN SCHWARZKOPF

91. During her tenure as the president of the National Organization for Women, she pressed for collegiate sports to be included under Title IX, but she drew fire from some NOW members for her support for fathers’ rights in custody cases.
KAREN DECROW?

92. The first woman elected head of the American Heart Association, she is credited with developing the field of pediatric cardiology.
HELEN TAUSSIG

93. From 1996 to 2008, this American golfer amassed twelve wins on the PGA tour, but his only Major win was in the Players Championship.
DAVID TOMS?

94. According to the opening lines of the eponymous novel he narrates, he “was born in the Year 1632, in the City of York, of a good Family, tho' not of that Country, my Father being a Foreigner of Bremen, who settled first at Hull.”
ROBINSON CRUSOE

95. In 1964, when the country headed by this African nationalist merged with another newly independent state, he became first president of the renamed successor state – a position he held for the next 21 years.
JULIUS NYERERE

96. He has been nominated for eleven Oscars in six different categories – winning twice for Best Director, once for Best Film Editing, and once for Best Cinematography.
ALFONSO CUARON

97. After graduating near the top of his class at Yale Law School in 1955, he failed the New York bar exam – beginning a period of unemployment and depression that led to his becoming a born-again Christian.
PAT ROBERTSON

98. Spanish soprano Montserrat Caballe said of this rock vocalist – with whom she recorded an album – that “he sang with an incisive sense of rhythm, his vocal placement was very good and he was able to glide effortlessly from a register to another. He also had a great musicality. His phrasing was subtle, delicate and sweet or energetic and slamming. He was able to find the right coloring or expressive nuance for each word.
FREDDIE MERCURY

99. This tycoon was enormously influential, but historians now regard his claim of having personally started a war as greatly exaggerated.
WILLIAM RANDOLPH HEARST

100. His quintessential poem contains such memorable lines as “For every atom belonging to me as good belongs to you" and “In all people I see myself, none more and not one a barleycorn less.”
WALT WHITMAN


ASSOCIATED WORDS
Kane
Rockefeller
Nash
Simpson
Eames
Lupo
Rosanne
Bette
Rachel
Bernie
Gordon
Gidget
Hazel
Peter
Joy
Emma
Georgia
Arizona
Illinois
Vermont
South Dakota
Minnesota
Cleveland
Seattle
Austria
Liberia
Hong Kong
Moon
Delta
Prairie
Pool
Battlefield
Civil War
French Revolution
Stooge
Big Mouth
Attorney
Inspector
Cook
Gigolo
Pilgrim
Bourgeoisie
Cubist
Predator
Horse
Foxes
Cub
Shark
Dolphin
Possum
Climate
Snow
Rain
Spring
Afternoon
Philanthropy
Fashion
Treasury
Commerce
Airplane
Automobile
Wheel
Box
Skylight
Needles
Rags
Net
Boot
Club
Petroleum
RNA
Pizza
Ribs
Fatty
Radioactive
Invisible
Incomplete
Escape
Rescue
Crying
Top

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jarnon
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Re: Game #201: Zero-Sum Game

#39 Post by jarnon » Tue Jul 14, 2020 12:49 pm

franktangredi wrote:
Tue Jul 14, 2020 12:15 pm
One of them is correct but incomplete; what's listed seems like a full name, but it's actually missing the person's first name.
Could be 4. MARQUIS DONATIEN ALPHONSE FRANÇOIS DE SADE, 28. JUAN PONCE DE LEÓN or 83. RACHEL MEGHAN MARKLE.

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mellytu74
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Re: Game #201: Zero-Sum Game

#40 Post by mellytu74 » Tue Jul 14, 2020 1:00 pm

15. Known as the “Mouth of Mississippi,” this comedian was a regular at the Grand Ole Opry for a quarter of a century.
MINNIE PEARL

JERRY CLOWER

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kroxquo
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Re: Game #201: Zero-Sum Game

#41 Post by kroxquo » Tue Jul 14, 2020 3:05 pm

25. He set his naval record with the aid of a 7.62 NATO Mk11, a 5.56 NATO Mk12, a .300 Magnum M24, and a .338 Lapua Magnum.

I always forget CHRIS KYLE was navy
You live and learn. Or at least you live. - Douglas Adams

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kroxquo
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Re: Game #201: Zero-Sum Game

#42 Post by kroxquo » Tue Jul 14, 2020 3:11 pm

Two of the definite answers are wrong. There's nothing ambiguous about it. (Are you ready for me to tell you which ones?) One of them is correct but incomplete; what's listed seems like a full name, but it's actually missing the person's first name.

Schwarzkopf is actually H. Norman Schwarzkopf (Don't know what the H is for). Might that be it?
You live and learn. Or at least you live. - Douglas Adams

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littlebeast13
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Re: Game #201: Zero-Sum Game

#43 Post by littlebeast13 » Tue Jul 14, 2020 3:18 pm

kroxquo wrote:
Tue Jul 14, 2020 3:11 pm
Two of the definite answers are wrong. There's nothing ambiguous about it. (Are you ready for me to tell you which ones?) One of them is correct but incomplete; what's listed seems like a full name, but it's actually missing the person's first name.

Schwarzkopf is actually H. Norman Schwarzkopf (Don't know what the H is for). Might that be it?
I think Jarnon's right that the missing first name is Juan for Ponce De Leon...

lb13
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Re: Game #201: Zero-Sum Game

#44 Post by littlebeast13 » Tue Jul 14, 2020 3:31 pm

1. He served the exact same length of time as President of the United States and as Vice President of the United States.
MARTIN VAN BUREN


On a side note, this is one of the most fascinating bits of trivia I've learned from one of these games so far. Given 230+ years of Presidents and Vice Presidents, I would have never guessed only one person held both offices for the same amount of time. In scanning the list of VP's, it looks like Tricky Dick had the best shot at duplicating Van Buren's feat, but alas, he had to be a crook...

lb13
Thursday comics! Squirrel pictures! The link to my CafePress store! All kinds of fun stuff!!!!

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Re: Game #201: Zero-Sum Game

#45 Post by franktangredi » Tue Jul 14, 2020 3:38 pm

littlebeast13 wrote:
Tue Jul 14, 2020 3:31 pm
1. He served the exact same length of time as President of the United States and as Vice President of the United States.
MARTIN VAN BUREN


On a side note, this is one of the most fascinating bits of trivia I've learned from one of these games so far. Given 230+ years of Presidents and Vice Presidents, I would have never guessed only one person held both offices for the same amount of time. In scanning the list of VP's, it looks like Tricky Dick had the best shot at duplicating Van Buren's feat, but alas, he had to be a crook...

lb13
This surprised me, too. I had to check the VP list twice.

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Re: Game #201: Zero-Sum Game

#46 Post by mrkelley23 » Tue Jul 14, 2020 4:15 pm

franktangredi wrote:
Tue Jul 14, 2020 12:15 pm
Two of the definite answers are wrong. There's nothing ambiguous about it. (Are you ready for me to tell you which ones?) One of them is correct but incomplete; what's listed seems like a full name, but it's actually missing the person's first name.

Of the two with question marks, one is right and one is wrong.

Of those with alternate answers, only one does not include the correct answer.
littlebeast13 wrote:
Tue Jul 14, 2020 11:42 am
Updated Consolidation. Removed the "?" from all single answers in the last consolidation...


Identify the 100 people in the clues below. Match them into 40 groups of three according to a Tangredi, or principle you must discover for yourself. Then match each threesome with two of the Associated Words.

20 names will be used twice – once for their first name, once for their last name. Alternate matches are possible, but only one solution will allow all the game to be completed.

1. He served the exact same length of time as President of the United States and as Vice President of the United States.
MARTIN VAN BUREN

2. This author’s most famous novel begins with the title character deciding to go out and buy some flowers.
VIRGINIA WOOLF

3. The name of the artistic movement with which this painter is most associated derived from a canvas he exhibited in April 1874.
Paul Renoir? Edgar Degas? Claude Monet?

4. In a book published in 1789, this philosopher wrote, ““Nature has placed mankind under the governance of two sovereign masters, pain and pleasure. It is for them alone to point out what we ought to do, as well as to determine what we shall do.”
MARQUIS DE SADE

5. She has been acting long enough to have appeared on screen with both Clark Gable and Daniel Day Lewis.
SOPHIA LOREN

6. Six years after being named NFL Comeback Player of the Year, this quarterback led his team to their only Super Bowl win.
DREW BREES

7. Unlike the physicist in my last general knowledge game, this physicist really DID win the Nobel Prize for inventing the bubble chamber.
DONALD GLASER

8. DJMQ (whether she is the one to answer it or not):
One of this choreographer’s most notable works was a reimagined Nutcracker which used Tchaikovsky’s score but scrapped the entire story in favor of a new one about a boy’s relationship with his mother and his bizarre sexual fantasies.
Another DJMQ appears at #75

9. First appearing in May 1939, his name was derived from a medieval Scottish king and a Revolutionary War general.
BRUCE WAYNE

10. Prior to joining a Seattle-based rock band in 1997, he served as the tour drummer for Alanis Morissette.
TAYLOR HAWKINS

11. When he died this year at the age of 89, this minister was the last surviving founder of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference.
JOSEPH LOWERY

12. When this legendary Wild West outlaw was found shot through the head, suspects included Wyatt Earp and Doc Holliday – but Ben Cartwright was not involved in any way.
JOHNNY RINGO

13. Best known for his work with “fallen women” and orphans, this 17th century French Jesuit is the patron saint of lacemakers, medical social workers, and illegitimate children.
JOHN FRANCIS REGIS

14. Students of this influential anthropologist included Ruth Benedict, Zora Neale Hurston, and Margaret Mead.
FRANZ BOAS

15. Known as the “Mouth of Mississippi,” this comedian was a regular at the Grand Ole Opry for a quarter of a century.
MINNIE PEARL

16. This Victorian writer is best known for a comic novel about a self-centered peer and a collection of 50 sonnets about the failure of his first marriage.
GEORGE MEREDITH

17. The bicycle manufacturing firm that he founded in the 1880s eventually evolved into France’s largest automotive company.
Renault? Citroen? Peugeot?

18. She was the only American skater to win a gold medal at the Albertville Olympiad.
KRISTI YAMAGUCHI

19. In 1975, she was exiled from her South American homeland; three decades later, she began her first term as its president.
MICHELLE BACHELET

20. A specialist in women’s ready-to-wear fashion, he has also designed for three of the last four First Ladies, including the black sleeveless dress that Michelle Obama wore in her first official portrait.
MICHAEL KORS

21. The son of an even more prominent classical pianist, he won a Grammy for Most Promising New Classical Recording Artist of 1966.
PETER SERKIN

22. The grandson of an even more prominent evolutionary biologist, he served as the first director of UNESCO and was a founding member of the World Wildlife Fund.
JULIAN HUXLEY

23. He authored the best-selling non-fiction book of 1966, the first chapter of which was titled “The Sporty Corvair.”
RALPH NADER

24. Whenever this First Lady had an epileptic seizure, her husband would gently place a handkerchief over her face until it passed.
IDA MCKINLEY

25. He set his naval record with the aid of a 7.62 NATO Mk11, a 5.56 NATO Mk12, a .300 Magnum M24, and a .338 Lapua Magnum.

26. An economist with the Brookings Institute, in 2014 she became the first woman to hold a very powerful position.
JANET YELLIN

27. This Colombian artist is best known for his comically exaggerated paintings and sculptures of what he called his “fat figures.”
FERNANDO BOTERO

28. This explorer gave what became the 27th state to enter the Union its name.
PONCE DE LEON

29. Between 1949 and 1976, this pseudonymous author wrote 18 novels about a hard-boiled detective in the suburbs of Los Angeles.
ROSS MACDONALD

30. This specialist in crusty character roles was the earliest-born person ever nominated for an acting Oscar.
MAY ROBSON

31. This entrepreneur expanded his family’s Connecticut bagel bakery into a national brand.
MURRAY LENDER

32. He was preceded in two of his current Congressional positions by Nancy Pelosi and Paul Ryan.
KEVIN MCCARTHY

33. Earlier this year, he became the first emergency backup goaltender in NHL history to record a win.
DAVID AYRES

34. This 20th century German American philosopher wrote influential works on many subjects, including bioethics, technology, and the history of Gnosticism.

35. He did not invent what many people think he invented, but the single-wire version he developed quickly superseded all earlier versions.
SAMUEL MORSE

36. This member of the Country Music Hall of Fame – who died in a plane crash in 1964 – is reportedly the most popular English-language singer in Sri Lanka. (Sri Lanka?)
JIM REEVES

37. He is the most prominent resident of the Mater Ecclesiae Monastery.
POPE BENEDICT XVI

38. This nurse and “baby farmer” was hanged in 1896 for murdering an infant in her care, but the actual number may have been more than 400 – making her a leading candidate for England’s most prolific serial killer.
AMELIA DYER

39. This “peak performance coach” released the first of his infomercials in 1988.

40. He and his militia are best known for carrying out the bloodless capture of an enemy stronghold in the wee hours of May 10, 1775.
ETHAN ALLEN

41. The inaugural production of the Group Theatre was this North Carolina playwright’s tale of the decline of an aristocratic southern family.
PAUL GREEN

42. In between his eleven(!) marriages, this jazz saxophonist and bandleader found time to record hit versions of songs such as “Cherokee” and “Skyliner.”
CHARLIE BARNET

43. One of the fathers of modern surgery, he served as barber-surgeon to four kings of France.

44. In addition to his busy film career, this actor/writer/director has also founded a cannabis company. (Is anyone surprised?)
Tommy Chong? Cheech Marin? Woody Harrelson?

45. If it had not been for the passage of the Twenty-fifth Amendment, this congressman would have succeeded to the Presidency on August 9, 1974.
CARL ALBERT

46. His big brother beat him out of the womb by four minutes in 1957 and down the slopes by 0.21 seconds in 1984.
STEVE MAHRE

47. In 1934, she had the honor of being the first American journalist expelled from Nazi Germany.
DOROTHY THOMPSON

48. He made his first appearance on radio on April 26, 1952 and his final appearance (not counting reruns) on television on March 31, 1975.
MATT DILLON

49. In 1972, he founded what is today the world’s largest cruise line in terms of both fleet size and passengers carried.
TED ARISON

50. In 1824, this textile manufacturer sailed from Scotland to America to set up his first experimental community, which he hoped would become a model for a new way of organizing society. (It didn’t.)

51. This artist’s second best-known work was commissioned by the Southern Poverty Law Center and commemorates 41 people who were killed between 1954 and 1968.
MAYA LIN

52. In 1887 this British historian famously said, “"Power tends to corrupt, and absolute power corrupts absolutely. Great men are almost always bad men.”
LORD ACTON

53. Though most closely associated with one particular lyricist/playwright, this composer also wrote musicals in collaboration with Ira Gershwin, Langston Hughes, Maxwell Anderson, Alan Jay Lerner, Ogden Nash, and the writer in Clue # 41.
KURT WEILL

54. He’s a fake and he doesn’t know the territory!
PROFESSOR HAROLD HILL

55. This popular American author celebrated her 104th birthday in April.
BEVERLY CLEARY

56. He was a number one NBA draft pick, but ended up playing only 105 games in three seasons.
GREG ODEN

57. He starred in one of the scariest episodes of the original Twilight Zone, though he basically just slept through the whole thing.
RICHARD CONTE

58. This American physicist and his thesis adviser shared the Nobel Prize for their discovery of a new type of pulsar.

59. When this legislator and pamphleteer coined the phrase “Taxation without representation is tyranny,” he little imagined that he would later be plagued by mental illness exacerbated by a blow on the head from a tax collector.
JAMES OTIS

60. “Lord, don’t you care that my sister has left me to do the work by myself?” she complained. “Tell her to help me!" (He didn’t.)
MARTHA

61. A protegee of Martha Stewart, she went from the White House OMB to her own cooking show on the Food Network.
INA GARTEN

62. In 1869, this entrepreneur purchased a small company in Hastings-on-Hudson, New York; the following year, he accepted an offer to relocate to Akron, Ohio – and the rest is history.
Charles Goodyear? BF Goodrich?

63. This French political philosopher helped establish the theoretical foundations of absolutism with his 1576 treatise Six Books of the Republic.

64. It was during his last and greatest battle that he sent what became the classic message, “England expects that every man will do his duty.”
HORATIO NELSON

65. I can’t swear that he was the only cartoonist whose work helped apprehend a crook, but no cartoonist ever helped apprehend a bigger one.
THOMAS NAST

66. This astronomer formulated the theory of stellar nucleosynthesis, but the theory he is most known for naming is one that he himself rejected.
FRED HOYLE

67. At the age of 64, this swimmer became the first person to swim from Cuba to Florida without a shark cage
DIANA NYAD

68. It was on November 26, 1922, that he first espied those “wonderful things.”
HOAWRD CARTER

69. Citing a breach of confidentiality, Mineko Iwasaki brought a lawsuit against this novelist over his 1997 best-seller.

70. He is currently third in the line of Presidential succession.
CHUCK GRASSLEY

71. She was the oldest actor ever nominated for an Oscar for a leading role.
EMMANUELLE RIVA

72. While serving a six-month prison sentence for his involvement in the Pullman Strike, he became a committed socialist and would go on to cofound the Socialist Party of America and the IWW.
EUGENE DEBS

73. Appropriately, he had the lowest vocal range in the boy band he joined while he was a junior in high school – a gig he almost lost because he wasn’t much of a dancer.
LANCE BASS

74. A fellow contestant on a popular game show in 1978 called him “a very strange guy,” while the young lady who subsequently refused to go out with him found him “creepy.” Good call.
RODNEY ALCALA

75. DJMQ: This Cincinnati-born ballerina was a “muse” of George Balanchine, who choreographed the role of Dulcinea in his 1965 version of Don Quixote especially for her.

76. She once wrote, “Good manners have much to do with the emotions. To make them ring true, one must feel them, not merely exhibit them.”
AMY VANDERBILT

77. She was the first American woman to walk in space.

78. This physicist won the Nobel Prize for his invention of holography.
DENNIS GABOR

79. One of the founders of pragmatism, he was once called “America's greatest logician.”
CHARLES SANDERS PEIRCE

80. This pitcher’s two wins helped Cleveland take its first World Series trophy in 28 years.
BOB LEMON

81. He and his partner were two of the biggest stars in vaudeville in the decades before and after World War I, but his nephews reached even greater comedy heights.
AL SHEAN

82. Currently Senior National Correspondent for ABC, this journalist’s previous gigs have included stints as Chief White House Correspondent, co-anchor of a late-night news program, and reporter for Court TV.
TERRY MORAN

83. I’m sure she’s not the only woman who met her second husband on a blind date in 2016 and married him on May 19, 2018 – but she’s certainly the one best known for doing so.
MEGHAN MARKLE

84. The only Senators to vote against the confirmation of this Supreme Court justice were Don Nickles of Oklahoma, Jesse Helms of North Carolina, and Bob Smith of New Hampshire.
RUTH BADER GINSBURG

85. His nation’s greatest (arguably) composer, his greatest (arguably) work was the incidental music he wrote for an 1867 play by his nation’s greatest (arguably) dramatist.
EDVARD GRIEG

86. His 1893 novel about a tenement girl who descends into prostitution is considered the first work of American literary naturalism.
STEPHEN CRANE

87. This French artist developed a personal form of cubism derisively dubbed “tubism” due to its emphasis on cylindrical shapes.
FERNAND LEGER

88. Head of the Genovese crime family during most of the Prohibition era, he was eventually assassinated on the orders of his own lieutenant, Lucky Luciano.
JOE "THE BOSS" (Giuseppe) MASSERIA

89. The famous – or infamous – experiments conducted by this American psychologist were largely inspired by the trial of Adolf Eichmann.
STANLEY MILGRAM

90. During military exercises, this general wrote up a scenario on how to respond to respond to a regional dictator invading a neighboring country and seizing its oilfields; a month later, he got to put it into practice.
NORMAN SCHWARZKOPF

91. During her tenure as the president of the National Organization for Women, she pressed for collegiate sports to be included under Title IX, but she drew fire from some NOW members for her support for fathers’ rights in custody cases.
KAREN DECROW?

92. The first woman elected head of the American Heart Association, she is credited with developing the field of pediatric cardiology.
HELEN TAUSSIG

93. From 1996 to 2008, this American golfer amassed twelve wins on the PGA tour, but his only Major win was in the Players Championship.
DAVID TOMS?

94. According to the opening lines of the eponymous novel he narrates, he “was born in the Year 1632, in the City of York, of a good Family, tho' not of that Country, my Father being a Foreigner of Bremen, who settled first at Hull.”
ROBINSON CRUSOE

95. In 1964, when the country headed by this African nationalist merged with another newly independent state, he became first president of the renamed successor state – a position he held for the next 21 years.
JULIUS NYERERE

96. He has been nominated for eleven Oscars in six different categories – winning twice for Best Director, once for Best Film Editing, and once for Best Cinematography.
ALFONSO CUARON

97. After graduating near the top of his class at Yale Law School in 1955, he failed the New York bar exam – beginning a period of unemployment and depression that led to his becoming a born-again Christian.
PAT ROBERTSON

98. Spanish soprano Montserrat Caballe said of this rock vocalist – with whom she recorded an album – that “he sang with an incisive sense of rhythm, his vocal placement was very good and he was able to glide effortlessly from a register to another. He also had a great musicality. His phrasing was subtle, delicate and sweet or energetic and slamming. He was able to find the right coloring or expressive nuance for each word.
FREDDIE MERCURY

99. This tycoon was enormously influential, but historians now regard his claim of having personally started a war as greatly exaggerated.
WILLIAM RANDOLPH HEARST

100. His quintessential poem contains such memorable lines as “For every atom belonging to me as good belongs to you" and “In all people I see myself, none more and not one a barleycorn less.”
WALT WHITMAN


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I've confirmed that KAREN DECROW is correct; that means my answer of David Toms is incorrect. I will need some clarification, though, because to my knowledge, the Players Championship is not and has never been considered a "major." The majors are the Masters, the US Open, the British Open, and the PGA championship. The American winners of the Players championship between 1996 and 2008 are Fred Couples (1992 Masters winner), Justin Leonard (1997 British Open winner); David Duval (British Open champ in 2001); Hal Sutton (1983 PGA champ); Tiger Woods (not even gonna list); Davis Love III (1997 PGA champ); Fred Funk (only 8 PGA tour wins); and Phil Mickelson (Masters, British Open, and PGA champ).
For a successful technology, reality must take precedence over public relations, for Nature cannot be fooled. -- Richard Feynman

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franktangredi
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Re: Game #201: Zero-Sum Game

#47 Post by franktangredi » Tue Jul 14, 2020 4:34 pm

mrkelley23 wrote:
Tue Jul 14, 2020 4:15 pm

I've confirmed that KAREN DECROW is correct; that means my answer of David Toms is incorrect. I will need some clarification, though, because to my knowledge, the Players Championship is not and has never been considered a "major." The majors are the Masters, the US Open, the British Open, and the PGA championship. The American winners of the Players championship between 1996 and 2008 are Fred Couples (1992 Masters winner), Justin Leonard (1997 British Open winner); David Duval (British Open champ in 2001); Hal Sutton (1983 PGA champ); Tiger Woods (not even gonna list); Davis Love III (1997 PGA champ); Fred Funk (only 8 PGA tour wins); and Phil Mickelson (Masters, British Open, and PGA champ).
It's quite possible that I either got some inaccurate information or that I misinterpreted something. My apologies. I will say that one of the names you've listed here is the one I had in mind.

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mrkelley23
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Re: Game #201: Zero-Sum Game

#48 Post by mrkelley23 » Tue Jul 14, 2020 6:31 pm

In terms of the time frame, especially, then, it looks like JUSTIN LEONARD is who Frank had in mind. He did win 12 times on the PGA Tour, and he did win the Players championship in 1998, in addition to his win in the 1997 Open Championship (British Open).
For a successful technology, reality must take precedence over public relations, for Nature cannot be fooled. -- Richard Feynman

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mrkelley23
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Re: Game #201: Zero-Sum Game

#49 Post by mrkelley23 » Tue Jul 14, 2020 6:32 pm

I confirmed that 62. is BENJAMIN F. GOODRICH.

Still looking for one more definite that is wrong.
For a successful technology, reality must take precedence over public relations, for Nature cannot be fooled. -- Richard Feynman

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mrkelley23
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Re: Game #201: Zero-Sum Game

#50 Post by mrkelley23 » Tue Jul 14, 2020 6:40 pm

44. is kind of a toughie. I did confirm that Tommy Chong has started a cannabis company, and he is mostly involved in film, but he hasn't directed anything since 1990 that I can find. I think my guess of Woody Harrelson is out -- he doesn't seem to be involved in any cannabis companies, and he hasn't directed anything. Cheech Marin also has a cannabis company, and is arguably even busier than Chong, but he only has two directing credits, and they were both in the 1980s.

Seth Rogin is another possibility. He meets the cannabis company and actor-writer-director criteria, but almost all of his experience outside of acting has been in television only.

Gun to my head, I'd say Chong, but it wouldn't surprise me if it were Cheech, or Rogin, or even someone else we haven't thought of yet.
For a successful technology, reality must take precedence over public relations, for Nature cannot be fooled. -- Richard Feynman

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