Game #198: Generation Gap

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mellytu74
Posts: 8570
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Re: Game #198: Generation Gap

#26 Post by mellytu74 » Thu Mar 19, 2020 7:10 pm

105. This journalist was credited with breaking the Iran-Contra affair and revealing the CIA’s plot to assassinate Fidel Castro.

I am almost certain this is JACK ANDERSON.

31. Since opening his first restaurant in Santa Monica in 1979, this celebrity chef has become the dean of California cuisine, which he is also credited with introducing to New York.
WOLFGANG PUCK?

I don't think this is right. I saw celebrity chef and immediately thought of Puck. But, I was living in California when Spago opened, so that's after 1980. So I am wrong.

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jarnon
Posts: 5140
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Location: Merion, Pa.

Re: Game #198: Generation Gap

#27 Post by jarnon » Sun Mar 22, 2020 12:25 pm

franktangredi wrote:
Wed Mar 18, 2020 1:32 pm
Only one of the definite answers is wrong.
Stuck at home and in no rush to do my taxes, I have time to go through all the definites to find the wrong one:

113. This French philosopher’s 1945 book The Phenomenology of Perception is considered one of the major documents of existentialism.
ALBERT CAMUS

That means the other definites are right…

Identify the 150 people below. (Yes, that’s a lot of people, but the Tangredi is fairly simple – I hope.) Match them into 75 pairs according to a Tangredi, or principle you must discover for yourself. Then, match each pair with one of the Associated Words. No name will be used twice.

1. ABRAHAM LINCOLN
2. CHUCK BERRY
3. JOHN LOCKE
4. LEWIS CARROLL
5. SHAQUILLE O'NEAL

6. In 1996, this actress did something that Ingrid Bergman, Loretta Young, Deborah Kerr, Audrey Hepburn, and Anne Bancroft had previously failed to do.
SUSAN SARANDON?

7. This physicist won the Nobel Prize for the discoveries he made as a result of his development of the hydrogen bubble chamber.
NIELS BOHR?

8. DJMQ: In 1944, he choreographed a ballet for the Metropolitan Opera – partially inspired by a painting called The Fleet’s In – that itself became the inspiration for the first of his many Broadway musicals.
Another DJMQ appears at #127.

9. This Mannerist was considered a “flawless painter” but – thanks to Vasari and Browning – he is better remembered today as an unambitious artist whose reach did not exceed his grasp.

10. RALPH ABERNATHY

11. The first Cistercian abbot to the canonized, he played a key role in resolving a schism in the papacy and in organizing the Second Crusade.
BERNARD OF CLAIRVAUX

12. DIANNE VON FURSTENBERG
13. GABRIEL GARCIA MARQUEZ

14. This New Hampshire Republican was the only Senator from New England to vote against the Civil Rights Act of 1964.

15. Between 1963 and 2018, this pop singer won 20 Grammys, including a Lifetime Achievement Award.
TONY BENNETT

16. This English astronomer was the first to correctly hypothesize that the source of stellar energy was the fusion of hydrogen into helium.
ARTHUR EDDINGTON

17. Between 1945 and 1961, this American golfer amassed 40 PGA tour wins, placing him tenth on the all-time list.

18. Since 2001, this American filmmaker has received three Academy Award nominations for Best Original Screenplay, two for Best Animated Feature, and one each for Best Director and Best Picture.
BRAD BIRD?

19. This entrepreneur and his brothers began by buying and selling picture postcards, but things really took off in 1916 when he bought an engraving business and began selling his own creations.
HALL? CURRIER? IVES?

20. GREGOR SAMSA

21. At the time of his death, he was the last surviving U.S. Fleet Admiral.
CHESTER NIMITZ?

22. This British economist was award the Nobel Memorial Prize “for his discovery and clarification of the significance of transaction costs and property for the institutional structure and functioning of the economy."

23. WILLIAM ALLEN WHITE
24. MICKEY COHEN
25. OLIVER CROMWELL
26. CURTIS MAYFIELD

27. This Rangers defenseman was the last winner of the Norris Trophy before Bobby Orr began his eight-year run.
BRAD PARK?

28. This international cinema star died in 2017 at the age of 100.

29. This novelist won eight Spur Awards from the Western Writers of America, which also named him the great Western writer of all time.
ZANE GREY? LOUIS L'AMOUR?

30. He did not invent the device most associated with his name, but he developed the stamped steel blades that made the device highly profitable.
JOHN DEERE? GILETTE? SCHICK?

31. Since opening his first restaurant in Santa Monica in 1979, this celebrity chef has become the dean of California cuisine, which he is also credited with introducing to New York.

32. FLORENCE KELLEY
33. EDMUND HILLARY

34. A member of the Vienna Circle, this philosopher’s 1926 work The Logical Structure of the World is considered one of the seminal texts of logical positivism.
RUDOLPH CARNAP

35. JOSEPH SMITH

36. This Cubist sculptor, who held his first solo exhibition in 1920, was later forced to flee Nazi-occupied France and eventually settled in upstate New York.

37. ROD BLAGOJEVICH

38. He was the first of only two Norwegian-born scientists to win the Nobel Prize in Chemistry.
LARS ONSAGER

39. CONRAD JANIS

40. This writer’s most popular play is a satirical fantasy in which the title character, Countess Aurelia, saves Paris from destruction.
JEAN GIRAUDOUX

41. One of the eight inaugural members of the Motorsports Hall of Fame, he was the first man to drive a car 60 miles per hour on a circular track.

42. In 1955, this Italian soprano made her debut at the Metropolitan Opera in the role of Desdemona – the same role in which she made her farewell Met performance in 1973.
RENATA TIBALDI

43. The “Effect” named for this fictional character refers to an increase in young women choosing to enter the field of medicine, science, and law enforcement.

44. SEAN PARKER

45. In books such as The First New Nation, this American political sociologist helped define and promote the idea of American exceptionalism.
LIPSETT?

46. In 1777, this American general was court-martialed for his retreat from Fort Ticonderoga; fourteen years later, he lost more than 600 troops in what remains the single greatest defeat of the U.S. Army by Native American forces.
ST. CLAIR or SCHUYLER

47. She was the nation’s oldest First Lady … and the only once since Martha Washington to never once set foot in the White House.
BESS TRUMAN? RACHEL JACKSON? HARRISON?

48. RAYMOND LOWEY

49. This American engineer is the most recent of five women who have won the Nobel Prize in Chemistry.
FRANCES ARNOLD

50. EHUD OLMERT
51. NESTOR CHYLAK
52. AGNES NIXON
53. JUNIOR WELLS

54. This poet – son of the co-founder of a famous New York brokerage house – is one of only two people to win both the Glascock Prize (given to college undergraduates) and the Pulitzer Prize. (The other is Sylvia Plath.)

55. RICHARD AVEDON
56. DAN WHITE
57. JOE HILL

58. Though best remembered today as co-author a monumental 11-volume work, this historian first achieved prominence with a 1935 book that profiled Plato, Aristotle, Bacon, Spinoza, Voltaire, Kant, Schopenhauer, and Nietzsche.

59. AIMEE SEMPLE McPHERSON

60. This philosopher and logician had quite a pedigree: his paternal grandfather served as Prime Minister under Queen Victoria, and John Stuart Mill was his “secular godfather.”
BERTRAND RUSSELL?

61. WILHELM ROENTGEN
62. ABE FORTAS

63. This Italian writer’s masterpiece – a novel in which two young lovers are separated by the machinations of an evil nobleman – was regarded as a veiled attack on the Austrian empire.

64. He was the only knighted actor to appear on an episode of The Twilight Zone.

65. TOM T. HALL
66. EARL ANTHONY
67. HERB KELLEHER

68. As a criminal lawyer, he won 13 out of the 15 murder or attempted murder cases he tried, but arguably his most important case took place this year.
DERSHOWITZ?

69. WINFIELD SCOTT

70. In addition to his 25 year stint with NBC News – during which he reported on the Vietnam War, won a Peabody for his coverage of the Black September conflict, and served as commentator on Richard Nixon’s departure from office – this correspondent also published three successful mystery novels.

71. This astronaut served as the first female commander of the International Space Station.
PEGGY WHITSON

72. STEPHEN SONDHEIM

73. A proud member of the Ku Klux Klan, this Mississippi Senator supported the New Deal but violently opposed any moves toward desegregation and fought against an anti-lynching bill which he claimed would “open the floodgates of hell in the South.”

74. During his five seasons in the NFL (with the Seahawks and the Redskins), this wide receiver played in 54 games … which was four seasons and 53 games more than his father had managed.

75. This brunette…
FRITZ or HANS

76. … and this blonde were the eponymous protagonists of the longest running comic strip in U.S. history.
HANS or FRITZ KATZENJAMMER

77. This actress has been nominated for a record 16 Cesar Awards … and one Oscar.

78. HARPER LEE

79. In addition to his famous experiment involving maggots, this biologist also proved that vipers do not drink wine and that snake venom is not produced in the gall bladder

80. SARAH BRADY

81. Paintings such as Dutch Masters and Cigars and his own take on Washington Crossing the Delaware earned this American artist the title “Grandfather of Pop Art.”

82. MARTHA GELHORN
83. OSCAR MEYER
84. EDWIN STANTON

85. This early self-help guru developed a self-actualization technique which he dubbed Psycho-Cybernetics.
SEWARD?

86. VANNEVAR BUSH
87. BRET EASTON ELLIS
88. DASH CROFTS

89. This influential Romanian-born theatre director has worked in such venues as the Café La Mama, Circle in the Square, and the Metropolitan Opera, but perhaps his most memorable work was his innovative staging of The Cherry Orchard at Lincoln Center in 1977.

90. BODE MILLER

91. This German philosopher – whose students included Edmund Husserl and Sigmund Freud – is best known for bringing the medieval concept of intentionality back into the mainstream of modern thought.

92. MARIA MONTESSORI

93. In 1997, this Italian designer inherited 20% of the eponymous fashion house founded by her brother.
DONATELLA VERSACE?

94. ISAAC MAYER WISE

95. Known as the “Rostov Ripper,” this Soviet serial killer murdered at least 52 women and children between 1978 and 1990.

96. This British scientist and his American colleague Paul Lauterbur shared a Nobel Prize for their development of MRI techniques.
PETER MANSFIELD

97. CHRIS MARTIN

98. First executive director of the NHL Players Association, he became a member of the Hockey Hall of Fame in 1989 – and became a non-member nine years later after his convictions for fraud and embezzlement.
ALAN EAGLESON?

99. In a 2013 article, Entertainment Weekly called her "arguably the most iconic actress in the action genre, as well as one of the most visible Latinas in Hollywood."
MICHELLE RODRIGUEZ

100. In 1964, he became the first prime minister of what had been the British colony of Nyasaland.

101. Her best-known novel tells the story of a missionary family that moves from Georgia to the Belgian Congo
BARBARA KINGSOLVER

102. ELIZABETH ECKFORD
103. SERGIO ARAGONES
104. MOSHE DAYAN

105. This journalist was credited with breaking the Iran-Contra affair and revealing the CIA’s plot to assassinate Fidel Castro.
JACK ANDERSON

106. In addition to his evangelical work, he serves as President of the international relief organization Samaritan’s Purse.
FRANKLIN GRAHAM

107. He is the most notable Jewish title character in Victorian fiction – though he himself is not aware of his origins when the novel begins.

108. In 1844, this dentist begin his experiments with nitrous oxide by having one of his own teeth extracted by a colleague.

109. In the middle of his reign as world bantamweight champion, this Mexican boxer almost gave up fighting after one of his punches put his opponent into a coma from which he never awoke.
CARLOS ZARATE?

110. A member of an American dynasty, he was his state’s junior Senator for 25 years and it’s senior Senator for five.
JAY ROCKEFELLER?

111. OMAR SHARIF
112. DOROTHY SAYERS

113. This French philosopher’s 1945 book The Phenomenology of Perception is considered one of the major documents of existentialism.

114. This Italian baroque composer is the father of both the Neapolitan school of opera and of Domenico

115. ESTEE LAUDER

116. In 1946, this American anthropologist published an acclaimed study of Japanese culture and society.

117. This English nobleman was briefly the brother-in-law of the king – and, for a longer period, the fourth husband of his former brother-in-law’s widow. Got that?

118. CHARLES ATLAS

119. Among the designs of this French Renaissance architect is the wing of the Louvre that now bears his name.

120. In recognition of her many philanthropic works – which ranged from endowing a haven for young prostitutes to financing efforts to clean up London’s drinking water to serving as president of the British Beekeepers’ Association – this Baroness became the first woman to be presented with the Freedom of the City of London.

121. A pioneer in the modern science of animal behavior, this Dutch biologist made his reputation with his 1951 book The Study of Instinct.

122. VICTOR EMMANUEL
123. MANFRED MANN
124. CAROLE LANDIS

125. Under a pseudonym, this British Poet Laureate also wrote a popular series of mystery novels featuring an amateur detective originally modeled on W.H. Auden.

126. A charter member of the College Football Hall of Fame, this tackle went from Ole Miss to the Brooklyn Dodgers (no, not those Brooklyn Dodgers) and eventually ended up in the Pro Football Hall of Fame as well.

127. DJMQ: A onetime member of the Lester Horton Dance Theatre, she moved on to Broadway where she met the tall Trinidadian who became her husband – and with whom she choreographed her signature solo.

128. Along with a Jesuit missionary, he became the first white man to map the Mississippi River.
LOUIS JOLLIETT

129. He was hanged for horse theft in 1739, at the age of 34, but is far better known for another type of crime.

130. This German-American developmental psychologist is credited with coining the term “identity crisis” to describe the failure to achieve ego individuation during adolescence.

131. James Watt’s business partner, he also made major contributions to the process for minting coins.

132. There is some dispute as to whether he invented the typewriter, but there is no doubt that he gave us QWERTY.
CHRISTOPHER LATHAM SHOLES

133. NATHANIEL WEST
134. JEFF LYNNE

135. This German director’s 1996 film about an alien invasion became the first movie to gross $100 million in less than a week.
ROLAND EMMERICH

136. He is the last remaining “Watergate Baby” in the United States Senate.
PAT LEAHY

137. ROD LAVER
138. BUCK ROGERS
139. FANNY FARMER

140. This influential 18th century Irish philosopher formulated the concept of immaterialism, which contends that objects such as tables and chairs cannot exist without being perceived

141. The works of this Pre-Raphaelite painter – a colleague of Rosetti and Morris – included a watercolor called Love Among the Ruins which was accidentally destroyed by a cleaner who mistook it for an oil painting.

142. OTIS WILLIAMS

143. Brother Arthur, Sister June, and Brother Michael are the only living members of the religious sect that she founded.
MOTHER ANN LEE?

144. This actor received four Oscar nominations – the first under the direction of Frank Capra and the last under the direction of Alfred Hitchcock.
CLAUDE RAINS? JAMES STEWART?

145. HANNIBAL
146. KUBLAI KHAN
147. DAVID ORTIZ
148. HAROLD PINTER
149. MICHAEL FARADAY
150. RACHEL CARSON

ASSOCIATED WORDS
7
22
86
500
F
H
IQ
CBC
Chicago
Chicago
Cleveland
Philadelphia
Las Vegas
Atlantic City
Oklahoma
Idaho
Nebraska
New England
Germany
India
Israel
Vietnam
Australia
Scotland
Churchill
JFK
Harding
Trump
Veep
Attorney General
Neocon
Captain
Archbishop
Chef
Soprano
Hobbitt
Klingon
Pete
Wesley
Carrie
Victoria
Abby
Othello
Supermarket
Dock
Farm
Cloister
Upstairs
Arsenic
Ammonia
Peas
Spaghetti
Violin
Piano
Drums
Pole
Camera
Rocket
Army
Police
Crowd
Strangers
Clueless
Mad
Hypnotism
Orgasm
Creepers
Twist
Graduation
Romance
Quantum
Imitation
Bulldog
Labour
Sunny Side

User avatar
franktangredi
Posts: 5894
Joined: Tue Feb 12, 2008 4:34 pm

Re: Game #198: Generation Gap

#28 Post by franktangredi » Sun Mar 22, 2020 12:41 pm

Yes, all the definites are right, though some names will have to be put into a different form for correct use in the Tangredi.

Of the answers with a question mark, 9 are right and 3 are wrong.

Of the answers with alternates, two contain the correct answer and one does not.
jarnon wrote:
Sun Mar 22, 2020 12:25 pm
franktangredi wrote:
Wed Mar 18, 2020 1:32 pm
Only one of the definite answers is wrong.
Stuck at home and in no rush to do my taxes, I have time to go through all the definites to find the wrong one:

113. This French philosopher’s 1945 book The Phenomenology of Perception is considered one of the major documents of existentialism.
ALBERT CAMUS

That means the other definites are right…

Identify the 150 people below. (Yes, that’s a lot of people, but the Tangredi is fairly simple – I hope.) Match them into 75 pairs according to a Tangredi, or principle you must discover for yourself. Then, match each pair with one of the Associated Words. No name will be used twice.

1. ABRAHAM LINCOLN
2. CHUCK BERRY
3. JOHN LOCKE
4. LEWIS CARROLL
5. SHAQUILLE O'NEAL

6. In 1996, this actress did something that Ingrid Bergman, Loretta Young, Deborah Kerr, Audrey Hepburn, and Anne Bancroft had previously failed to do.
SUSAN SARANDON?

7. This physicist won the Nobel Prize for the discoveries he made as a result of his development of the hydrogen bubble chamber.
NIELS BOHR?

8. DJMQ: In 1944, he choreographed a ballet for the Metropolitan Opera – partially inspired by a painting called The Fleet’s In – that itself became the inspiration for the first of his many Broadway musicals.
Another DJMQ appears at #127.

9. This Mannerist was considered a “flawless painter” but – thanks to Vasari and Browning – he is better remembered today as an unambitious artist whose reach did not exceed his grasp.

10. RALPH ABERNATHY

11. The first Cistercian abbot to the canonized, he played a key role in resolving a schism in the papacy and in organizing the Second Crusade.
BERNARD OF CLAIRVAUX

12. DIANNE VON FURSTENBERG
13. GABRIEL GARCIA MARQUEZ

14. This New Hampshire Republican was the only Senator from New England to vote against the Civil Rights Act of 1964.

15. Between 1963 and 2018, this pop singer won 20 Grammys, including a Lifetime Achievement Award.
TONY BENNETT

16. This English astronomer was the first to correctly hypothesize that the source of stellar energy was the fusion of hydrogen into helium.
ARTHUR EDDINGTON

17. Between 1945 and 1961, this American golfer amassed 40 PGA tour wins, placing him tenth on the all-time list.

18. Since 2001, this American filmmaker has received three Academy Award nominations for Best Original Screenplay, two for Best Animated Feature, and one each for Best Director and Best Picture.
BRAD BIRD?

19. This entrepreneur and his brothers began by buying and selling picture postcards, but things really took off in 1916 when he bought an engraving business and began selling his own creations.
HALL? CURRIER? IVES?

20. GREGOR SAMSA

21. At the time of his death, he was the last surviving U.S. Fleet Admiral.
CHESTER NIMITZ?

22. This British economist was award the Nobel Memorial Prize “for his discovery and clarification of the significance of transaction costs and property for the institutional structure and functioning of the economy."

23. WILLIAM ALLEN WHITE
24. MICKEY COHEN
25. OLIVER CROMWELL
26. CURTIS MAYFIELD

27. This Rangers defenseman was the last winner of the Norris Trophy before Bobby Orr began his eight-year run.
BRAD PARK?

28. This international cinema star died in 2017 at the age of 100.

29. This novelist won eight Spur Awards from the Western Writers of America, which also named him the great Western writer of all time.
ZANE GREY? LOUIS L'AMOUR?

30. He did not invent the device most associated with his name, but he developed the stamped steel blades that made the device highly profitable.
JOHN DEERE? GILETTE? SCHICK?

31. Since opening his first restaurant in Santa Monica in 1979, this celebrity chef has become the dean of California cuisine, which he is also credited with introducing to New York.

32. FLORENCE KELLEY
33. EDMUND HILLARY

34. A member of the Vienna Circle, this philosopher’s 1926 work The Logical Structure of the World is considered one of the seminal texts of logical positivism.
RUDOLPH CARNAP

35. JOSEPH SMITH

36. This Cubist sculptor, who held his first solo exhibition in 1920, was later forced to flee Nazi-occupied France and eventually settled in upstate New York.

37. ROD BLAGOJEVICH

38. He was the first of only two Norwegian-born scientists to win the Nobel Prize in Chemistry.
LARS ONSAGER

39. CONRAD JANIS

40. This writer’s most popular play is a satirical fantasy in which the title character, Countess Aurelia, saves Paris from destruction.
JEAN GIRAUDOUX

41. One of the eight inaugural members of the Motorsports Hall of Fame, he was the first man to drive a car 60 miles per hour on a circular track.

42. In 1955, this Italian soprano made her debut at the Metropolitan Opera in the role of Desdemona – the same role in which she made her farewell Met performance in 1973.
RENATA TIBALDI

43. The “Effect” named for this fictional character refers to an increase in young women choosing to enter the field of medicine, science, and law enforcement.

44. SEAN PARKER

45. In books such as The First New Nation, this American political sociologist helped define and promote the idea of American exceptionalism.
LIPSETT?

46. In 1777, this American general was court-martialed for his retreat from Fort Ticonderoga; fourteen years later, he lost more than 600 troops in what remains the single greatest defeat of the U.S. Army by Native American forces.
ST. CLAIR or SCHUYLER

47. She was the nation’s oldest First Lady … and the only once since Martha Washington to never once set foot in the White House.
BESS TRUMAN? RACHEL JACKSON? HARRISON?

48. RAYMOND LOWEY

49. This American engineer is the most recent of five women who have won the Nobel Prize in Chemistry.
FRANCES ARNOLD

50. EHUD OLMERT
51. NESTOR CHYLAK
52. AGNES NIXON
53. JUNIOR WELLS

54. This poet – son of the co-founder of a famous New York brokerage house – is one of only two people to win both the Glascock Prize (given to college undergraduates) and the Pulitzer Prize. (The other is Sylvia Plath.)

55. RICHARD AVEDON
56. DAN WHITE
57. JOE HILL

58. Though best remembered today as co-author a monumental 11-volume work, this historian first achieved prominence with a 1935 book that profiled Plato, Aristotle, Bacon, Spinoza, Voltaire, Kant, Schopenhauer, and Nietzsche.

59. AIMEE SEMPLE McPHERSON

60. This philosopher and logician had quite a pedigree: his paternal grandfather served as Prime Minister under Queen Victoria, and John Stuart Mill was his “secular godfather.”
BERTRAND RUSSELL?

61. WILHELM ROENTGEN
62. ABE FORTAS

63. This Italian writer’s masterpiece – a novel in which two young lovers are separated by the machinations of an evil nobleman – was regarded as a veiled attack on the Austrian empire.

64. He was the only knighted actor to appear on an episode of The Twilight Zone.

65. TOM T. HALL
66. EARL ANTHONY
67. HERB KELLEHER

68. As a criminal lawyer, he won 13 out of the 15 murder or attempted murder cases he tried, but arguably his most important case took place this year.
DERSHOWITZ?

69. WINFIELD SCOTT

70. In addition to his 25 year stint with NBC News – during which he reported on the Vietnam War, won a Peabody for his coverage of the Black September conflict, and served as commentator on Richard Nixon’s departure from office – this correspondent also published three successful mystery novels.

71. This astronaut served as the first female commander of the International Space Station.
PEGGY WHITSON

72. STEPHEN SONDHEIM

73. A proud member of the Ku Klux Klan, this Mississippi Senator supported the New Deal but violently opposed any moves toward desegregation and fought against an anti-lynching bill which he claimed would “open the floodgates of hell in the South.”

74. During his five seasons in the NFL (with the Seahawks and the Redskins), this wide receiver played in 54 games … which was four seasons and 53 games more than his father had managed.

75. This brunette…
FRITZ or HANS

76. … and this blonde were the eponymous protagonists of the longest running comic strip in U.S. history.
HANS or FRITZ KATZENJAMMER

77. This actress has been nominated for a record 16 Cesar Awards … and one Oscar.

78. HARPER LEE

79. In addition to his famous experiment involving maggots, this biologist also proved that vipers do not drink wine and that snake venom is not produced in the gall bladder

80. SARAH BRADY

81. Paintings such as Dutch Masters and Cigars and his own take on Washington Crossing the Delaware earned this American artist the title “Grandfather of Pop Art.”

82. MARTHA GELHORN
83. OSCAR MEYER
84. EDWIN STANTON

85. This early self-help guru developed a self-actualization technique which he dubbed Psycho-Cybernetics.
SEWARD?

86. VANNEVAR BUSH
87. BRET EASTON ELLIS
88. DASH CROFTS

89. This influential Romanian-born theatre director has worked in such venues as the Café La Mama, Circle in the Square, and the Metropolitan Opera, but perhaps his most memorable work was his innovative staging of The Cherry Orchard at Lincoln Center in 1977.

90. BODE MILLER

91. This German philosopher – whose students included Edmund Husserl and Sigmund Freud – is best known for bringing the medieval concept of intentionality back into the mainstream of modern thought.

92. MARIA MONTESSORI

93. In 1997, this Italian designer inherited 20% of the eponymous fashion house founded by her brother.
DONATELLA VERSACE?

94. ISAAC MAYER WISE

95. Known as the “Rostov Ripper,” this Soviet serial killer murdered at least 52 women and children between 1978 and 1990.

96. This British scientist and his American colleague Paul Lauterbur shared a Nobel Prize for their development of MRI techniques.
PETER MANSFIELD

97. CHRIS MARTIN

98. First executive director of the NHL Players Association, he became a member of the Hockey Hall of Fame in 1989 – and became a non-member nine years later after his convictions for fraud and embezzlement.
ALAN EAGLESON?

99. In a 2013 article, Entertainment Weekly called her "arguably the most iconic actress in the action genre, as well as one of the most visible Latinas in Hollywood."
MICHELLE RODRIGUEZ

100. In 1964, he became the first prime minister of what had been the British colony of Nyasaland.

101. Her best-known novel tells the story of a missionary family that moves from Georgia to the Belgian Congo
BARBARA KINGSOLVER

102. ELIZABETH ECKFORD
103. SERGIO ARAGONES
104. MOSHE DAYAN

105. This journalist was credited with breaking the Iran-Contra affair and revealing the CIA’s plot to assassinate Fidel Castro.
JACK ANDERSON

106. In addition to his evangelical work, he serves as President of the international relief organization Samaritan’s Purse.
FRANKLIN GRAHAM

107. He is the most notable Jewish title character in Victorian fiction – though he himself is not aware of his origins when the novel begins.

108. In 1844, this dentist begin his experiments with nitrous oxide by having one of his own teeth extracted by a colleague.

109. In the middle of his reign as world bantamweight champion, this Mexican boxer almost gave up fighting after one of his punches put his opponent into a coma from which he never awoke.
CARLOS ZARATE?

110. A member of an American dynasty, he was his state’s junior Senator for 25 years and it’s senior Senator for five.
JAY ROCKEFELLER?

111. OMAR SHARIF
112. DOROTHY SAYERS

113. This French philosopher’s 1945 book The Phenomenology of Perception is considered one of the major documents of existentialism.

114. This Italian baroque composer is the father of both the Neapolitan school of opera and of Domenico

115. ESTEE LAUDER

116. In 1946, this American anthropologist published an acclaimed study of Japanese culture and society.

117. This English nobleman was briefly the brother-in-law of the king – and, for a longer period, the fourth husband of his former brother-in-law’s widow. Got that?

118. CHARLES ATLAS

119. Among the designs of this French Renaissance architect is the wing of the Louvre that now bears his name.

120. In recognition of her many philanthropic works – which ranged from endowing a haven for young prostitutes to financing efforts to clean up London’s drinking water to serving as president of the British Beekeepers’ Association – this Baroness became the first woman to be presented with the Freedom of the City of London.

121. A pioneer in the modern science of animal behavior, this Dutch biologist made his reputation with his 1951 book The Study of Instinct.

122. VICTOR EMMANUEL
123. MANFRED MANN
124. CAROLE LANDIS

125. Under a pseudonym, this British Poet Laureate also wrote a popular series of mystery novels featuring an amateur detective originally modeled on W.H. Auden.

126. A charter member of the College Football Hall of Fame, this tackle went from Ole Miss to the Brooklyn Dodgers (no, not those Brooklyn Dodgers) and eventually ended up in the Pro Football Hall of Fame as well.

127. DJMQ: A onetime member of the Lester Horton Dance Theatre, she moved on to Broadway where she met the tall Trinidadian who became her husband – and with whom she choreographed her signature solo.

128. Along with a Jesuit missionary, he became the first white man to map the Mississippi River.
LOUIS JOLLIETT

129. He was hanged for horse theft in 1739, at the age of 34, but is far better known for another type of crime.

130. This German-American developmental psychologist is credited with coining the term “identity crisis” to describe the failure to achieve ego individuation during adolescence.

131. James Watt’s business partner, he also made major contributions to the process for minting coins.

132. There is some dispute as to whether he invented the typewriter, but there is no doubt that he gave us QWERTY.
CHRISTOPHER LATHAM SHOLES

133. NATHANIEL WEST
134. JEFF LYNNE

135. This German director’s 1996 film about an alien invasion became the first movie to gross $100 million in less than a week.
ROLAND EMMERICH

136. He is the last remaining “Watergate Baby” in the United States Senate.
PAT LEAHY

137. ROD LAVER
138. BUCK ROGERS
139. FANNY FARMER

140. This influential 18th century Irish philosopher formulated the concept of immaterialism, which contends that objects such as tables and chairs cannot exist without being perceived

141. The works of this Pre-Raphaelite painter – a colleague of Rosetti and Morris – included a watercolor called Love Among the Ruins which was accidentally destroyed by a cleaner who mistook it for an oil painting.

142. OTIS WILLIAMS

143. Brother Arthur, Sister June, and Brother Michael are the only living members of the religious sect that she founded.
MOTHER ANN LEE?

144. This actor received four Oscar nominations – the first under the direction of Frank Capra and the last under the direction of Alfred Hitchcock.
CLAUDE RAINS? JAMES STEWART?

145. HANNIBAL
146. KUBLAI KHAN
147. DAVID ORTIZ
148. HAROLD PINTER
149. MICHAEL FARADAY
150. RACHEL CARSON

ASSOCIATED WORDS
7
22
86
500
F
H
IQ
CBC
Chicago
Chicago
Cleveland
Philadelphia
Las Vegas
Atlantic City
Oklahoma
Idaho
Nebraska
New England
Germany
India
Israel
Vietnam
Australia
Scotland
Churchill
JFK
Harding
Trump
Veep
Attorney General
Neocon
Captain
Archbishop
Chef
Soprano
Hobbitt
Klingon
Pete
Wesley
Carrie
Victoria
Abby
Othello
Supermarket
Dock
Farm
Cloister
Upstairs
Arsenic
Ammonia
Peas
Spaghetti
Violin
Piano
Drums
Pole
Camera
Rocket
Army
Police
Crowd
Strangers
Clueless
Mad
Hypnotism
Orgasm
Creepers
Twist
Graduation
Romance
Quantum
Imitation
Bulldog
Labour
Sunny Side

User avatar
jarnon
Posts: 5140
Joined: Tue Oct 09, 2007 9:52 pm
Location: Merion, Pa.

Re: Game #198: Generation Gap

#29 Post by jarnon » Sun Mar 22, 2020 12:42 pm

117. This English nobleman was briefly the brother-in-law of the king – and, for a longer period, the fourth husband of his former brother-in-law’s widow. Got that?
THOMAS SEYMOUR

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Vandal
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Contact:

Re: Game #198: Generation Gap

#30 Post by Vandal » Mon Mar 23, 2020 11:40 am

129. He was hanged for horse theft in 1739, at the age of 34, but is far better known for another type of crime.
DICK TURPIN
_________________________________________________________________________________
Available now:
The Secret At Haney Field: A Baseball Mystery
The Right Hand Rule
Center Point
Dizzy Miss Lizzie
Running On Empty
The Tick Tock Man

Visit my website: http://www.rmclarkauthor.com

Coming in 2020: The Dragon's Song by Binh Pham and R. M. Clark

Working on:
Scout's Honor (follow on to The Secret at Haney Field)

Recently finished:
Devin Drake and The Family Secret

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Re: Game #198: Generation Gap

#31 Post by mrkelley23 » Tue Mar 24, 2020 11:46 am

Some corrections and additions.
jarnon wrote:
Sun Mar 22, 2020 12:25 pm
franktangredi wrote:
Wed Mar 18, 2020 1:32 pm
Only one of the definite answers is wrong.
Stuck at home and in no rush to do my taxes, I have time to go through all the definites to find the wrong one:

113. This French philosopher’s 1945 book The Phenomenology of Perception is considered one of the major documents of existentialism.
ALBERT CAMUS

That means the other definites are right…

Identify the 150 people below. (Yes, that’s a lot of people, but the Tangredi is fairly simple – I hope.) Match them into 75 pairs according to a Tangredi, or principle you must discover for yourself. Then, match each pair with one of the Associated Words. No name will be used twice.

1. ABRAHAM LINCOLN
2. CHUCK BERRY
3. JOHN LOCKE
4. LEWIS CARROLL (Charles Dodgson)
5. SHAQUILLE O'NEAL

6. In 1996, this actress did something that Ingrid Bergman, Loretta Young, Deborah Kerr, Audrey Hepburn, and Anne Bancroft had previously failed to do.
SUSAN SARANDON? Confirmed

7. This physicist won the Nobel Prize for the discoveries he made as a result of his development of the hydrogen bubble chamber.
NIELS BOHR? No, this was DONALD GLASER

8. DJMQ: In 1944, he choreographed a ballet for the Metropolitan Opera – partially inspired by a painting called The Fleet’s In – that itself became the inspiration for the first of his many Broadway musicals.
Another DJMQ appears at #127.

9. This Mannerist was considered a “flawless painter” but – thanks to Vasari and Browning – he is better remembered today as an unambitious artist whose reach did not exceed his grasp.

10. RALPH ABERNATHY

11. The first Cistercian abbot to the canonized, he played a key role in resolving a schism in the papacy and in organizing the Second Crusade.
BERNARD OF CLAIRVAUX

12. DIANE VON FURSTENBERG
13. GABRIEL GARCIA MARQUEZ

14. This New Hampshire Republican was the only Senator from New England to vote against the Civil Rights Act of 1964.

15. Between 1963 and 2018, this pop singer won 20 Grammys, including a Lifetime Achievement Award.
TONY BENNETT

16. This English astronomer was the first to correctly hypothesize that the source of stellar energy was the fusion of hydrogen into helium.
ARTHUR EDDINGTON

17. Between 1945 and 1961, this American golfer amassed 40 PGA tour wins, placing him tenth on the all-time list.

18. Since 2001, this American filmmaker has received three Academy Award nominations for Best Original Screenplay, two for Best Animated Feature, and one each for Best Director and Best Picture.
BRAD BIRD? It's actually WES ANDERSON

19. This entrepreneur and his brothers began by buying and selling picture postcards, but things really took off in 1916 when he bought an engraving business and began selling his own creations.
HALL? CURRIER? IVES? JOYCE HALL is correct

20. GREGOR SAMSA

21. At the time of his death, he was the last surviving U.S. Fleet Admiral.
CHESTER NIMITZ? Confirmed

22. This British economist was award the Nobel Memorial Prize “for his discovery and clarification of the significance of transaction costs and property for the institutional structure and functioning of the economy."

23. WILLIAM ALLEN WHITE
24. MICKEY COHEN
25. OLIVER CROMWELL
26. CURTIS MAYFIELD

27. This Rangers defenseman was the last winner of the Norris Trophy before Bobby Orr began his eight-year run.
BRAD PARK? No, it's HARRY HOWELL and that's the third wrong single question mark, so the rest must be right

28. This international cinema star died in 2017 at the age of 100.

29. This novelist won eight Spur Awards from the Western Writers of America, which also named him the great Western writer of all time.
ZANE GREY? LOUIS L'AMOUR? Surprisingly, this is someone named ELMER KELTON. And that's the one with alternates that did not contain the correct answer

30. He did not invent the device most associated with his name, but he developed the stamped steel blades that made the device highly profitable.
JOHN DEERE? GILETTE? SCHICK? Looks like KING GILLETTE is the subject of this clue

31. Since opening his first restaurant in Santa Monica in 1979, this celebrity chef has become the dean of California cuisine, which he is also credited with introducing to New York.

32. FLORENCE KELLEY
33. EDMUND HILLARY

34. A member of the Vienna Circle, this philosopher’s 1926 work The Logical Structure of the World is considered one of the seminal texts of logical positivism.
RUDOLPH CARNAP

35. JOSEPH SMITH

36. This Cubist sculptor, who held his first solo exhibition in 1920, was later forced to flee Nazi-occupied France and eventually settled in upstate New York.

37. ROD BLAGOJEVICH

38. He was the first of only two Norwegian-born scientists to win the Nobel Prize in Chemistry.
LARS ONSAGER

39. CONRAD JANIS

40. This writer’s most popular play is a satirical fantasy in which the title character, Countess Aurelia, saves Paris from destruction.
JEAN GIRAUDOUX

41. One of the eight inaugural members of the Motorsports Hall of Fame, he was the first man to drive a car 60 miles per hour on a circular track.

42. In 1955, this Italian soprano made her debut at the Metropolitan Opera in the role of Desdemona – the same role in which she made her farewell Met performance in 1973.
RENATA TIBALDI

43. The “Effect” named for this fictional character refers to an increase in young women choosing to enter the field of medicine, science, and law enforcement.

44. SEAN PARKER

45. In books such as The First New Nation, this American political sociologist helped define and promote the idea of American exceptionalism.
LIPSETT? SEYMOUR LIPSET is correct

46. In 1777, this American general was court-martialed for his retreat from Fort Ticonderoga; fourteen years later, he lost more than 600 troops in what remains the single greatest defeat of the U.S. Army by Native American forces.
ST. CLAIR or SCHUYLER ARTHUR ST. CLAIR is correct

47. She was the nation’s oldest First Lady … and the only once since Martha Washington to never once set foot in the White House.
BESS TRUMAN? RACHEL JACKSON? HARRISON? ANNA HARRISON is correct

48. RAYMOND LOEWY

49. This American engineer is the most recent of five women who have won the Nobel Prize in Chemistry.
FRANCES ARNOLD

50. EHUD OLMERT
51. NESTOR CHYLAK
52. AGNES NIXON
53. JUNIOR WELLS

54. This poet – son of the co-founder of a famous New York brokerage house – is one of only two people to win both the Glascock Prize (given to college undergraduates) and the Pulitzer Prize. (The other is Sylvia Plath.)

55. RICHARD AVEDON
56. DAN WHITE
57. JOE HILL

58. Though best remembered today as co-author a monumental 11-volume work, this historian first achieved prominence with a 1935 book that profiled Plato, Aristotle, Bacon, Spinoza, Voltaire, Kant, Schopenhauer, and Nietzsche.

59. AIMEE SEMPLE McPHERSON

60. This philosopher and logician had quite a pedigree: his paternal grandfather served as Prime Minister under Queen Victoria, and John Stuart Mill was his “secular godfather.”
BERTRAND RUSSELL? Confirmed

61. WILHELM ROENTGEN
62. ABE FORTAS

63. This Italian writer’s masterpiece – a novel in which two young lovers are separated by the machinations of an evil nobleman – was regarded as a veiled attack on the Austrian empire.

64. He was the only knighted actor to appear on an episode of The Twilight Zone.

65. TOM T. HALL
66. EARL ANTHONY
67. HERB KELLEHER

68. As a criminal lawyer, he won 13 out of the 15 murder or attempted murder cases he tried, but arguably his most important case took place this year.
DERSHOWITZ? Confirmed

69. WINFIELD SCOTT

70. In addition to his 25 year stint with NBC News – during which he reported on the Vietnam War, won a Peabody for his coverage of the Black September conflict, and served as commentator on Richard Nixon’s departure from office – this correspondent also published three successful mystery novels.

71. This astronaut served as the first female commander of the International Space Station.
PEGGY WHITSON

72. STEPHEN SONDHEIM

73. A proud member of the Ku Klux Klan, this Mississippi Senator supported the New Deal but violently opposed any moves toward desegregation and fought against an anti-lynching bill which he claimed would “open the floodgates of hell in the South.”

74. During his five seasons in the NFL (with the Seahawks and the Redskins), this wide receiver played in 54 games … which was four seasons and 53 games more than his father had managed.

75. This brunette…
FRITZ or HANS

76. … and this blonde were the eponymous protagonists of the longest running comic strip in U.S. history.
HANS or FRITZ KATZENJAMMER

77. This actress has been nominated for a record 16 Cesar Awards … and one Oscar.

78. HARPER LEE

79. In addition to his famous experiment involving maggots, this biologist also proved that vipers do not drink wine and that snake venom is not produced in the gall bladder

80. SARAH BRADY

81. Paintings such as Dutch Masters and Cigars and his own take on Washington Crossing the Delaware earned this American artist the title “Grandfather of Pop Art.”

82. MARTHA GELHORN
83. OSCAR MEYER
84. EDWIN STANTON

85. This early self-help guru developed a self-actualization technique which he dubbed Psycho-Cybernetics.
SEWARD?

86. VANNEVAR BUSH
87. BRET EASTON ELLIS
88. DASH CROFTS

89. This influential Romanian-born theatre director has worked in such venues as the Café La Mama, Circle in the Square, and the Metropolitan Opera, but perhaps his most memorable work was his innovative staging of The Cherry Orchard at Lincoln Center in 1977.

90. BODE MILLER

91. This German philosopher – whose students included Edmund Husserl and Sigmund Freud – is best known for bringing the medieval concept of intentionality back into the mainstream of modern thought.

92. MARIA MONTESSORI

93. In 1997, this Italian designer inherited 20% of the eponymous fashion house founded by her brother.
DONATELLA VERSACE?

94. ISAAC MAYER WISE

95. Known as the “Rostov Ripper,” this Soviet serial killer murdered at least 52 women and children between 1978 and 1990.

96. This British scientist and his American colleague Paul Lauterbur shared a Nobel Prize for their development of MRI techniques.
PETER MANSFIELD

97. CHRIS MARTIN

98. First executive director of the NHL Players Association, he became a member of the Hockey Hall of Fame in 1989 – and became a non-member nine years later after his convictions for fraud and embezzlement.
ALAN EAGLESON? Confirmed

99. In a 2013 article, Entertainment Weekly called her "arguably the most iconic actress in the action genre, as well as one of the most visible Latinas in Hollywood."
MICHELLE RODRIGUEZ

100. In 1964, he became the first prime minister of what had been the British colony of Nyasaland.

101. Her best-known novel tells the story of a missionary family that moves from Georgia to the Belgian Congo
BARBARA KINGSOLVER

102. ELIZABETH ECKFORD
103. SERGIO ARAGONES
104. MOSHE DAYAN

105. This journalist was credited with breaking the Iran-Contra affair and revealing the CIA’s plot to assassinate Fidel Castro.
JACK ANDERSON

106. In addition to his evangelical work, he serves as President of the international relief organization Samaritan’s Purse.
FRANKLIN GRAHAM

107. He is the most notable Jewish title character in Victorian fiction – though he himself is not aware of his origins when the novel begins.

108. In 1844, this dentist begin his experiments with nitrous oxide by having one of his own teeth extracted by a colleague.

109. In the middle of his reign as world bantamweight champion, this Mexican boxer almost gave up fighting after one of his punches put his opponent into a coma from which he never awoke.
CARLOS ZARATE? Confirmed, although Wikipedia lists his full name as CARLOS ZARATE SERNA

110. A member of an American dynasty, he was his state’s junior Senator for 25 years and it’s senior Senator for five.
JAY ROCKEFELLER? Confirmed

111. OMAR SHARIF
112. DOROTHY SAYERS

113. This French philosopher’s 1945 book The Phenomenology of Perception is considered one of the major documents of existentialism.

114. This Italian baroque composer is the father of both the Neapolitan school of opera and of Domenico

115. ESTEE LAUDER

116. In 1946, this American anthropologist published an acclaimed study of Japanese culture and society.

117. This English nobleman was briefly the brother-in-law of the king – and, for a longer period, the fourth husband of his former brother-in-law’s widow. Got that?

118. CHARLES ATLAS

119. Among the designs of this French Renaissance architect is the wing of the Louvre that now bears his name.

120. In recognition of her many philanthropic works – which ranged from endowing a haven for young prostitutes to financing efforts to clean up London’s drinking water to serving as president of the British Beekeepers’ Association – this Baroness became the first woman to be presented with the Freedom of the City of London.

121. A pioneer in the modern science of animal behavior, this Dutch biologist made his reputation with his 1951 book The Study of Instinct.

122. VICTOR EMMANUEL
123. MANFRED MANN
124. CAROLE LANDIS

125. Under a pseudonym, this British Poet Laureate also wrote a popular series of mystery novels featuring an amateur detective originally modeled on W.H. Auden.

126. A charter member of the College Football Hall of Fame, this tackle went from Ole Miss to the Brooklyn Dodgers (no, not those Brooklyn Dodgers) and eventually ended up in the Pro Football Hall of Fame as well.

127. DJMQ: A onetime member of the Lester Horton Dance Theatre, she moved on to Broadway where she met the tall Trinidadian who became her husband – and with whom she choreographed her signature solo.

128. Along with a Jesuit missionary, he became the first white man to map the Mississippi River.
LOUIS JOLIET

129. He was hanged for horse theft in 1739, at the age of 34, but is far better known for another type of crime.

130. This German-American developmental psychologist is credited with coining the term “identity crisis” to describe the failure to achieve ego individuation during adolescence.

131. James Watt’s business partner, he also made major contributions to the process for minting coins.

132. There is some dispute as to whether he invented the typewriter, but there is no doubt that he gave us QWERTY.
CHRISTOPHER LATHAM SHOLES

133. NATHANIEL WEST
134. JEFF LYNNE

135. This German director’s 1996 film about an alien invasion became the first movie to gross $100 million in less than a week.
ROLAND EMMERICH

136. He is the last remaining “Watergate Baby” in the United States Senate.
PATRICK LEAHY

137. ROD LAVER
138. BUCK ROGERS
139. FANNY FARMER

140. This influential 18th century Irish philosopher formulated the concept of immaterialism, which contends that objects such as tables and chairs cannot exist without being perceived

141. The works of this Pre-Raphaelite painter – a colleague of Rosetti and Morris – included a watercolor called Love Among the Ruins which was accidentally destroyed by a cleaner who mistook it for an oil painting.

142. OTIS WILLIAMS

143. Brother Arthur, Sister June, and Brother Michael are the only living members of the religious sect that she founded.
MOTHER ANN LEE? Confirmed

144. This actor received four Oscar nominations – the first under the direction of Frank Capra and the last under the direction of Alfred Hitchcock.
CLAUDE RAINS? JAMES STEWART? CLAUDE RAINS is correct

145. HANNIBAL
146. KUBLAI KHAN
147. DAVID ORTIZ
148. HAROLD PINTER
149. MICHAEL FARADAY
150. RACHEL CARSON

ASSOCIATED WORDS
7
22
86
500
F
H
IQ
CBC
Chicago
Chicago
Cleveland
Philadelphia
Las Vegas
Atlantic City
Oklahoma
Idaho
Nebraska
New England
Germany
India
Israel
Vietnam
Australia
Scotland
Churchill
JFK
Harding
Trump
Veep
Attorney General
Neocon
Captain
Archbishop
Chef
Soprano
Hobbitt
Klingon
Pete
Wesley
Carrie
Victoria
Abby
Othello
Supermarket
Dock
Farm
Cloister
Upstairs
Arsenic
Ammonia
Peas
Spaghetti
Violin
Piano
Drums
Pole
Camera
Rocket
Army
Police
Crowd
Strangers
Clueless
Mad
Hypnotism
Orgasm
Creepers
Twist
Graduation
Romance
Quantum
Imitation
Bulldog
Labour
Sunny Side
For a successful technology, reality must take precedence over public relations, for Nature cannot be fooled. -- Richard Feynman

User avatar
mrkelley23
Posts: 5604
Joined: Mon Oct 08, 2007 6:48 pm
Location: Somewhere between Bureaucracy and Despair

Re: Game #198: Generation Gap

#32 Post by mrkelley23 » Tue Mar 24, 2020 11:47 am

Some corrections and additions
jarnon wrote:
Sun Mar 22, 2020 12:25 pm
franktangredi wrote:
Wed Mar 18, 2020 1:32 pm
Only one of the definite answers is wrong.
Stuck at home and in no rush to do my taxes, I have time to go through all the definites to find the wrong one:

113. This French philosopher’s 1945 book The Phenomenology of Perception is considered one of the major documents of existentialism.
ALBERT CAMUS

That means the other definites are right…

Identify the 150 people below. (Yes, that’s a lot of people, but the Tangredi is fairly simple – I hope.) Match them into 75 pairs according to a Tangredi, or principle you must discover for yourself. Then, match each pair with one of the Associated Words. No name will be used twice.

1. ABRAHAM LINCOLN
2. CHUCK BERRY
3. JOHN LOCKE
4. LEWIS CARROLL (Charles Dodgson)
5. SHAQUILLE O'NEAL

6. In 1996, this actress did something that Ingrid Bergman, Loretta Young, Deborah Kerr, Audrey Hepburn, and Anne Bancroft had previously failed to do.
SUSAN SARANDON? Confirmed

7. This physicist won the Nobel Prize for the discoveries he made as a result of his development of the hydrogen bubble chamber.
NIELS BOHR? No, this was DONALD GLASER

8. DJMQ: In 1944, he choreographed a ballet for the Metropolitan Opera – partially inspired by a painting called The Fleet’s In – that itself became the inspiration for the first of his many Broadway musicals.
Another DJMQ appears at #127.

9. This Mannerist was considered a “flawless painter” but – thanks to Vasari and Browning – he is better remembered today as an unambitious artist whose reach did not exceed his grasp.

10. RALPH ABERNATHY

11. The first Cistercian abbot to the canonized, he played a key role in resolving a schism in the papacy and in organizing the Second Crusade.
BERNARD OF CLAIRVAUX

12. DIANE VON FURSTENBERG
13. GABRIEL GARCIA MARQUEZ

14. This New Hampshire Republican was the only Senator from New England to vote against the Civil Rights Act of 1964.

15. Between 1963 and 2018, this pop singer won 20 Grammys, including a Lifetime Achievement Award.
TONY BENNETT

16. This English astronomer was the first to correctly hypothesize that the source of stellar energy was the fusion of hydrogen into helium.
ARTHUR EDDINGTON

17. Between 1945 and 1961, this American golfer amassed 40 PGA tour wins, placing him tenth on the all-time list.

18. Since 2001, this American filmmaker has received three Academy Award nominations for Best Original Screenplay, two for Best Animated Feature, and one each for Best Director and Best Picture.
BRAD BIRD? It's actually WES ANDERSON

19. This entrepreneur and his brothers began by buying and selling picture postcards, but things really took off in 1916 when he bought an engraving business and began selling his own creations.
HALL? CURRIER? IVES? JOYCE HALL is correct

20. GREGOR SAMSA

21. At the time of his death, he was the last surviving U.S. Fleet Admiral.
CHESTER NIMITZ? Confirmed

22. This British economist was award the Nobel Memorial Prize “for his discovery and clarification of the significance of transaction costs and property for the institutional structure and functioning of the economy."

23. WILLIAM ALLEN WHITE
24. MICKEY COHEN
25. OLIVER CROMWELL
26. CURTIS MAYFIELD

27. This Rangers defenseman was the last winner of the Norris Trophy before Bobby Orr began his eight-year run.
BRAD PARK? No, it's HARRY HOWELL and that's the third wrong single question mark, so the rest must be right

28. This international cinema star died in 2017 at the age of 100.

29. This novelist won eight Spur Awards from the Western Writers of America, which also named him the great Western writer of all time.
ZANE GREY? LOUIS L'AMOUR? Surprisingly, this is someone named ELMER KELTON. And that's the one with alternates that did not contain the correct answer

30. He did not invent the device most associated with his name, but he developed the stamped steel blades that made the device highly profitable.
JOHN DEERE? GILETTE? SCHICK? Looks like KING GILLETTE is the subject of this clue

31. Since opening his first restaurant in Santa Monica in 1979, this celebrity chef has become the dean of California cuisine, which he is also credited with introducing to New York.

32. FLORENCE KELLEY
33. EDMUND HILLARY

34. A member of the Vienna Circle, this philosopher’s 1926 work The Logical Structure of the World is considered one of the seminal texts of logical positivism.
RUDOLPH CARNAP

35. JOSEPH SMITH

36. This Cubist sculptor, who held his first solo exhibition in 1920, was later forced to flee Nazi-occupied France and eventually settled in upstate New York.

37. ROD BLAGOJEVICH

38. He was the first of only two Norwegian-born scientists to win the Nobel Prize in Chemistry.
LARS ONSAGER

39. CONRAD JANIS

40. This writer’s most popular play is a satirical fantasy in which the title character, Countess Aurelia, saves Paris from destruction.
JEAN GIRAUDOUX

41. One of the eight inaugural members of the Motorsports Hall of Fame, he was the first man to drive a car 60 miles per hour on a circular track.

42. In 1955, this Italian soprano made her debut at the Metropolitan Opera in the role of Desdemona – the same role in which she made her farewell Met performance in 1973.
RENATA TIBALDI

43. The “Effect” named for this fictional character refers to an increase in young women choosing to enter the field of medicine, science, and law enforcement.

44. SEAN PARKER

45. In books such as The First New Nation, this American political sociologist helped define and promote the idea of American exceptionalism.
LIPSETT? SEYMOUR LIPSET is correct

46. In 1777, this American general was court-martialed for his retreat from Fort Ticonderoga; fourteen years later, he lost more than 600 troops in what remains the single greatest defeat of the U.S. Army by Native American forces.
ST. CLAIR or SCHUYLER ARTHUR ST. CLAIR is correct

47. She was the nation’s oldest First Lady … and the only once since Martha Washington to never once set foot in the White House.
BESS TRUMAN? RACHEL JACKSON? HARRISON? ANNA HARRISON is correct

48. RAYMOND LOEWY

49. This American engineer is the most recent of five women who have won the Nobel Prize in Chemistry.
FRANCES ARNOLD

50. EHUD OLMERT
51. NESTOR CHYLAK
52. AGNES NIXON
53. JUNIOR WELLS

54. This poet – son of the co-founder of a famous New York brokerage house – is one of only two people to win both the Glascock Prize (given to college undergraduates) and the Pulitzer Prize. (The other is Sylvia Plath.)

55. RICHARD AVEDON
56. DAN WHITE
57. JOE HILL

58. Though best remembered today as co-author a monumental 11-volume work, this historian first achieved prominence with a 1935 book that profiled Plato, Aristotle, Bacon, Spinoza, Voltaire, Kant, Schopenhauer, and Nietzsche.

59. AIMEE SEMPLE McPHERSON

60. This philosopher and logician had quite a pedigree: his paternal grandfather served as Prime Minister under Queen Victoria, and John Stuart Mill was his “secular godfather.”
BERTRAND RUSSELL? Confirmed

61. WILHELM ROENTGEN
62. ABE FORTAS

63. This Italian writer’s masterpiece – a novel in which two young lovers are separated by the machinations of an evil nobleman – was regarded as a veiled attack on the Austrian empire.

64. He was the only knighted actor to appear on an episode of The Twilight Zone.

65. TOM T. HALL
66. EARL ANTHONY
67. HERB KELLEHER

68. As a criminal lawyer, he won 13 out of the 15 murder or attempted murder cases he tried, but arguably his most important case took place this year.
DERSHOWITZ? Confirmed

69. WINFIELD SCOTT

70. In addition to his 25 year stint with NBC News – during which he reported on the Vietnam War, won a Peabody for his coverage of the Black September conflict, and served as commentator on Richard Nixon’s departure from office – this correspondent also published three successful mystery novels.

71. This astronaut served as the first female commander of the International Space Station.
PEGGY WHITSON

72. STEPHEN SONDHEIM

73. A proud member of the Ku Klux Klan, this Mississippi Senator supported the New Deal but violently opposed any moves toward desegregation and fought against an anti-lynching bill which he claimed would “open the floodgates of hell in the South.”

74. During his five seasons in the NFL (with the Seahawks and the Redskins), this wide receiver played in 54 games … which was four seasons and 53 games more than his father had managed.

75. This brunette…
FRITZ or HANS

76. … and this blonde were the eponymous protagonists of the longest running comic strip in U.S. history.
HANS or FRITZ KATZENJAMMER

77. This actress has been nominated for a record 16 Cesar Awards … and one Oscar.

78. HARPER LEE

79. In addition to his famous experiment involving maggots, this biologist also proved that vipers do not drink wine and that snake venom is not produced in the gall bladder

80. SARAH BRADY

81. Paintings such as Dutch Masters and Cigars and his own take on Washington Crossing the Delaware earned this American artist the title “Grandfather of Pop Art.”

82. MARTHA GELHORN
83. OSCAR MEYER
84. EDWIN STANTON

85. This early self-help guru developed a self-actualization technique which he dubbed Psycho-Cybernetics.
SEWARD?

86. VANNEVAR BUSH
87. BRET EASTON ELLIS
88. DASH CROFTS

89. This influential Romanian-born theatre director has worked in such venues as the Café La Mama, Circle in the Square, and the Metropolitan Opera, but perhaps his most memorable work was his innovative staging of The Cherry Orchard at Lincoln Center in 1977.

90. BODE MILLER

91. This German philosopher – whose students included Edmund Husserl and Sigmund Freud – is best known for bringing the medieval concept of intentionality back into the mainstream of modern thought.

92. MARIA MONTESSORI

93. In 1997, this Italian designer inherited 20% of the eponymous fashion house founded by her brother.
DONATELLA VERSACE?

94. ISAAC MAYER WISE

95. Known as the “Rostov Ripper,” this Soviet serial killer murdered at least 52 women and children between 1978 and 1990.

96. This British scientist and his American colleague Paul Lauterbur shared a Nobel Prize for their development of MRI techniques.
PETER MANSFIELD

97. CHRIS MARTIN

98. First executive director of the NHL Players Association, he became a member of the Hockey Hall of Fame in 1989 – and became a non-member nine years later after his convictions for fraud and embezzlement.
ALAN EAGLESON? Confirmed

99. In a 2013 article, Entertainment Weekly called her "arguably the most iconic actress in the action genre, as well as one of the most visible Latinas in Hollywood."
MICHELLE RODRIGUEZ

100. In 1964, he became the first prime minister of what had been the British colony of Nyasaland.

101. Her best-known novel tells the story of a missionary family that moves from Georgia to the Belgian Congo
BARBARA KINGSOLVER

102. ELIZABETH ECKFORD
103. SERGIO ARAGONES
104. MOSHE DAYAN

105. This journalist was credited with breaking the Iran-Contra affair and revealing the CIA’s plot to assassinate Fidel Castro.
JACK ANDERSON

106. In addition to his evangelical work, he serves as President of the international relief organization Samaritan’s Purse.
FRANKLIN GRAHAM

107. He is the most notable Jewish title character in Victorian fiction – though he himself is not aware of his origins when the novel begins.

108. In 1844, this dentist begin his experiments with nitrous oxide by having one of his own teeth extracted by a colleague.

109. In the middle of his reign as world bantamweight champion, this Mexican boxer almost gave up fighting after one of his punches put his opponent into a coma from which he never awoke.
CARLOS ZARATE? Confirmed, although Wikipedia lists his full name as CARLOS ZARATE SERNA

110. A member of an American dynasty, he was his state’s junior Senator for 25 years and it’s senior Senator for five.
JAY ROCKEFELLER? Confirmed

111. OMAR SHARIF
112. DOROTHY SAYERS

113. This French philosopher’s 1945 book The Phenomenology of Perception is considered one of the major documents of existentialism.

114. This Italian baroque composer is the father of both the Neapolitan school of opera and of Domenico

115. ESTEE LAUDER

116. In 1946, this American anthropologist published an acclaimed study of Japanese culture and society.

117. This English nobleman was briefly the brother-in-law of the king – and, for a longer period, the fourth husband of his former brother-in-law’s widow. Got that?

118. CHARLES ATLAS

119. Among the designs of this French Renaissance architect is the wing of the Louvre that now bears his name.

120. In recognition of her many philanthropic works – which ranged from endowing a haven for young prostitutes to financing efforts to clean up London’s drinking water to serving as president of the British Beekeepers’ Association – this Baroness became the first woman to be presented with the Freedom of the City of London.

121. A pioneer in the modern science of animal behavior, this Dutch biologist made his reputation with his 1951 book The Study of Instinct.

122. VICTOR EMMANUEL
123. MANFRED MANN
124. CAROLE LANDIS

125. Under a pseudonym, this British Poet Laureate also wrote a popular series of mystery novels featuring an amateur detective originally modeled on W.H. Auden.

126. A charter member of the College Football Hall of Fame, this tackle went from Ole Miss to the Brooklyn Dodgers (no, not those Brooklyn Dodgers) and eventually ended up in the Pro Football Hall of Fame as well.

127. DJMQ: A onetime member of the Lester Horton Dance Theatre, she moved on to Broadway where she met the tall Trinidadian who became her husband – and with whom she choreographed her signature solo.

128. Along with a Jesuit missionary, he became the first white man to map the Mississippi River.
LOUIS JOLIET

129. He was hanged for horse theft in 1739, at the age of 34, but is far better known for another type of crime.

130. This German-American developmental psychologist is credited with coining the term “identity crisis” to describe the failure to achieve ego individuation during adolescence.

131. James Watt’s business partner, he also made major contributions to the process for minting coins.

132. There is some dispute as to whether he invented the typewriter, but there is no doubt that he gave us QWERTY.
CHRISTOPHER LATHAM SHOLES

133. NATHANIEL WEST
134. JEFF LYNNE

135. This German director’s 1996 film about an alien invasion became the first movie to gross $100 million in less than a week.
ROLAND EMMERICH

136. He is the last remaining “Watergate Baby” in the United States Senate.
PATRICK LEAHY

137. ROD LAVER
138. BUCK ROGERS
139. FANNY FARMER

140. This influential 18th century Irish philosopher formulated the concept of immaterialism, which contends that objects such as tables and chairs cannot exist without being perceived

141. The works of this Pre-Raphaelite painter – a colleague of Rosetti and Morris – included a watercolor called Love Among the Ruins which was accidentally destroyed by a cleaner who mistook it for an oil painting.

142. OTIS WILLIAMS

143. Brother Arthur, Sister June, and Brother Michael are the only living members of the religious sect that she founded.
MOTHER ANN LEE? Confirmed

144. This actor received four Oscar nominations – the first under the direction of Frank Capra and the last under the direction of Alfred Hitchcock.
CLAUDE RAINS? JAMES STEWART? CLAUDE RAINS is correct

145. HANNIBAL
146. KUBLAI KHAN
147. DAVID ORTIZ
148. HAROLD PINTER
149. MICHAEL FARADAY
150. RACHEL CARSON

ASSOCIATED WORDS
7
22
86
500
F
H
IQ
CBC
Chicago
Chicago
Cleveland
Philadelphia
Las Vegas
Atlantic City
Oklahoma
Idaho
Nebraska
New England
Germany
India
Israel
Vietnam
Australia
Scotland
Churchill
JFK
Harding
Trump
Veep
Attorney General
Neocon
Captain
Archbishop
Chef
Soprano
Hobbitt
Klingon
Pete
Wesley
Carrie
Victoria
Abby
Othello
Supermarket
Dock
Farm
Cloister
Upstairs
Arsenic
Ammonia
Peas
Spaghetti
Violin
Piano
Drums
Pole
Camera
Rocket
Army
Police
Crowd
Strangers
Clueless
Mad
Hypnotism
Orgasm
Creepers
Twist
Graduation
Romance
Quantum
Imitation
Bulldog
Labour
Sunny Side
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Re: Game #198: Generation Gap

#33 Post by littlebeast13 » Tue Mar 24, 2020 12:05 pm

64. He was the only knighted actor to appear on an episode of The Twilight Zone.

Had to look up the name, but I was sure this was the guy who played Uncle Simon....

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Re: Game #198: Generation Gap

#34 Post by jarnon » Tue Mar 24, 2020 4:35 pm

Thanks for the research, MrK!

Updated consolidation…

Identify the 150 people below. (Yes, that’s a lot of people, but the Tangredi is fairly simple – I hope.) Match them into 75 pairs according to a Tangredi, or principle you must discover for yourself. Then, match each pair with one of the Associated Words. No name will be used twice.

1. ABRAHAM LINCOLN
2. CHUCK BERRY
3. JOHN LOCKE
4. LEWIS CARROLL (Charles Dodgson)
5. SHAQUILLE O'NEAL
6. SUSAN SARANDON

7. This physicist won the Nobel Prize for the discoveries he made as a result of his development of the hydrogen bubble chamber.
DONALD GLASER

8. DJMQ: In 1944, he choreographed a ballet for the Metropolitan Opera – partially inspired by a painting called The Fleet’s In – that itself became the inspiration for the first of his many Broadway musicals.
Another DJMQ appears at #127.

9. This Mannerist was considered a “flawless painter” but – thanks to Vasari and Browning – he is better remembered today as an unambitious artist whose reach did not exceed his grasp.

10. RALPH ABERNATHY
11. BERNARD OF CLAIRVAUX
12. DIANNE VON FURSTENBERG
13. GABRIEL GARCIA MARQUEZ

14. This New Hampshire Republican was the only Senator from New England to vote against the Civil Rights Act of 1964.

15. TONY BENNETT
16. ARTHUR EDDINGTON

17. Between 1945 and 1961, this American golfer amassed 40 PGA tour wins, placing him tenth on the all-time list.

18. Since 2001, this American filmmaker has received three Academy Award nominations for Best Original Screenplay, two for Best Animated Feature, and one each for Best Director and Best Picture.
WES ANDERSON

19. This entrepreneur and his brothers began by buying and selling picture postcards, but things really took off in 1916 when he bought an engraving business and began selling his own creations.
JOYCE HALL

20. GREGOR SAMSA
21. CHESTER NIMITZ

22. This British economist was award the Nobel Memorial Prize “for his discovery and clarification of the significance of transaction costs and property for the institutional structure and functioning of the economy."

23. WILLIAM ALLEN WHITE
24. MICKEY COHEN
25. OLIVER CROMWELL
26. CURTIS MAYFIELD

27. This Rangers defenseman was the last winner of the Norris Trophy before Bobby Orr began his eight-year run.
HARRY HOWELL

28. This international cinema star died in 2017 at the age of 100.

29. This novelist won eight Spur Awards from the Western Writers of America, which also named him the great Western writer of all time.
ELMER KELTON

30. He did not invent the device most associated with his name, but he developed the stamped steel blades that made the device highly profitable.
KING GILLETTE

31. Since opening his first restaurant in Santa Monica in 1979, this celebrity chef has become the dean of California cuisine, which he is also credited with introducing to New York.

32. FLORENCE KELLEY
33. EDMUND HILLARY
34. RUDOLPH CARNAP
35. JOSEPH SMITH

36. This Cubist sculptor, who held his first solo exhibition in 1920, was later forced to flee Nazi-occupied France and eventually settled in upstate New York.

37. ROD BLAGOJEVICH
38. LARS ONSAGER
39. CONRAD JANIS
40. JEAN GIRAUDOUX

41. One of the eight inaugural members of the Motorsports Hall of Fame, he was the first man to drive a car 60 miles per hour on a circular track.

42. RENATA TIBALDI

43. The “Effect” named for this fictional character refers to an increase in young women choosing to enter the field of medicine, science, and law enforcement.

44. SEAN PARKER
45. SEYMOUR LIPSET

46. In 1777, this American general was court-martialed for his retreat from Fort Ticonderoga; fourteen years later, he lost more than 600 troops in what remains the single greatest defeat of the U.S. Army by Native American forces.
ARTHUR ST. CLAIR

47. She was the nation’s oldest First Lady … and the only once since Martha Washington to never once set foot in the White House.
ANNA HARRISON

48. RAYMOND LOWEY
49. FRANCES ARNOLD
50. EHUD OLMERT
51. NESTOR CHYLAK
52. AGNES NIXON
53. JUNIOR WELLS

54. This poet – son of the co-founder of a famous New York brokerage house – is one of only two people to win both the Glascock Prize (given to college undergraduates) and the Pulitzer Prize. (The other is Sylvia Plath.)

55. RICHARD AVEDON
56. DAN WHITE
57. JOE HILL

58. Though best remembered today as co-author a monumental 11-volume work, this historian first achieved prominence with a 1935 book that profiled Plato, Aristotle, Bacon, Spinoza, Voltaire, Kant, Schopenhauer, and Nietzsche.

59. AIMEE SEMPLE McPHERSON
60. BERTRAND RUSSELL
61. WILHELM ROENTGEN
62. ABE FORTAS

63. This Italian writer’s masterpiece – a novel in which two young lovers are separated by the machinations of an evil nobleman – was regarded as a veiled attack on the Austrian empire.

64. He was the only knighted actor to appear on an episode of The Twilight Zone.
CEDRIC HARDWICKE

65. TOM T. HALL
66. EARL ANTHONY
67. HERB KELLEHER
68. DERSHOWITZ
69. WINFIELD SCOTT

70. In addition to his 25 year stint with NBC News – during which he reported on the Vietnam War, won a Peabody for his coverage of the Black September conflict, and served as commentator on Richard Nixon’s departure from office – this correspondent also published three successful mystery novels.

71. PEGGY WHITSON
72. STEPHEN SONDHEIM

73. A proud member of the Ku Klux Klan, this Mississippi Senator supported the New Deal but violently opposed any moves toward desegregation and fought against an anti-lynching bill which he claimed would “open the floodgates of hell in the South.”

74. During his five seasons in the NFL (with the Seahawks and the Redskins), this wide receiver played in 54 games … which was four seasons and 53 games more than his father had managed.

75. This brunette…
FRITZ or HANS

76. … and this blonde were the eponymous protagonists of the longest running comic strip in U.S. history.
HANS or FRITZ KATZENJAMMER

77. This actress has been nominated for a record 16 Cesar Awards … and one Oscar.

78. HARPER LEE

79. In addition to his famous experiment involving maggots, this biologist also proved that vipers do not drink wine and that snake venom is not produced in the gall bladder

80. SARAH BRADY

81. Paintings such as Dutch Masters and Cigars and his own take on Washington Crossing the Delaware earned this American artist the title “Grandfather of Pop Art.”

82. MARTHA GELHORN
83. OSCAR MEYER
84. EDWIN STANTON
85. SEWARD
86. VANNEVAR BUSH
87. BRET EASTON ELLIS
88. DASH CROFTS

89. This influential Romanian-born theatre director has worked in such venues as the Café La Mama, Circle in the Square, and the Metropolitan Opera, but perhaps his most memorable work was his innovative staging of The Cherry Orchard at Lincoln Center in 1977.

90. BODE MILLER

91. This German philosopher – whose students included Edmund Husserl and Sigmund Freud – is best known for bringing the medieval concept of intentionality back into the mainstream of modern thought.

92. MARIA MONTESSORI
93. DONATELLA VERSACE
94. ISAAC MAYER WISE

95. Known as the “Rostov Ripper,” this Soviet serial killer murdered at least 52 women and children between 1978 and 1990.

96. PETER MANSFIELD
97. CHRIS MARTIN
98. ALAN EAGLESON
99. MICHELLE RODRIGUEZ

100. In 1964, he became the first prime minister of what had been the British colony of Nyasaland.

101. BARBARA KINGSOLVER
102. ELIZABETH ECKFORD
103. SERGIO ARAGONES
104. MOSHE DAYAN
105. JACK ANDERSON
106. FRANKLIN GRAHAM

107. He is the most notable Jewish title character in Victorian fiction – though he himself is not aware of his origins when the novel begins.

108. In 1844, this dentist begin his experiments with nitrous oxide by having one of his own teeth extracted by a colleague.

109. CARLOS ZARATE SERNA
110. JAY ROCKEFELLER
111. OMAR SHARIF
112. DOROTHY SAYERS

113. This French philosopher’s 1945 book The Phenomenology of Perception is considered one of the major documents of existentialism.

114. This Italian baroque composer is the father of both the Neapolitan school of opera and of Domenico

115. ESTEE LAUDER

116. In 1946, this American anthropologist published an acclaimed study of Japanese culture and society.

117. This English nobleman was briefly the brother-in-law of the king – and, for a longer period, the fourth husband of his former brother-in-law’s widow. Got that?
THOMAS SEYMOUR

118. CHARLES ATLAS

119. Among the designs of this French Renaissance architect is the wing of the Louvre that now bears his name.

120. In recognition of her many philanthropic works – which ranged from endowing a haven for young prostitutes to financing efforts to clean up London’s drinking water to serving as president of the British Beekeepers’ Association – this Baroness became the first woman to be presented with the Freedom of the City of London.

121. A pioneer in the modern science of animal behavior, this Dutch biologist made his reputation with his 1951 book The Study of Instinct.

122. VICTOR EMMANUEL
123. MANFRED MANN
124. CAROLE LANDIS

125. Under a pseudonym, this British Poet Laureate also wrote a popular series of mystery novels featuring an amateur detective originally modeled on W.H. Auden.

126. A charter member of the College Football Hall of Fame, this tackle went from Ole Miss to the Brooklyn Dodgers (no, not those Brooklyn Dodgers) and eventually ended up in the Pro Football Hall of Fame as well.

127. DJMQ: A onetime member of the Lester Horton Dance Theatre, she moved on to Broadway where she met the tall Trinidadian who became her husband – and with whom she choreographed her signature solo.

128. LOUIS JOLIET

129. He was hanged for horse theft in 1739, at the age of 34, but is far better known for another type of crime.
DICK TURPIN

130. This German-American developmental psychologist is credited with coining the term “identity crisis” to describe the failure to achieve ego individuation during adolescence.

131. James Watt’s business partner, he also made major contributions to the process for minting coins.

132. CHRISTOPHER LATHAM SHOLES
133. NATHANIEL WEST
134. JEFF LYNNE
135. ROLAND EMMERICH
136. PAT LEAHY
137. ROD LAVER
138. BUCK ROGERS
139. FANNY FARMER

140. This influential 18th century Irish philosopher formulated the concept of immaterialism, which contends that objects such as tables and chairs cannot exist without being perceived

141. The works of this Pre-Raphaelite painter – a colleague of Rosetti and Morris – included a watercolor called Love Among the Ruins which was accidentally destroyed by a cleaner who mistook it for an oil painting.

142. OTIS WILLIAMS
143. MOTHER ANN LEE

144. This actor received four Oscar nominations – the first under the direction of Frank Capra and the last under the direction of Alfred Hitchcock.
CLAUDE RAINS

145. HANNIBAL
146. KUBLAI KHAN
147. DAVID ORTIZ
148. HAROLD PINTER
149. MICHAEL FARADAY
150. RACHEL CARSON

ASSOCIATED WORDS
7
22
86
500
F
H
IQ
CBC
Chicago
Chicago
Cleveland
Philadelphia
Las Vegas
Atlantic City
Oklahoma
Idaho
Nebraska
New England
Germany
India
Israel
Vietnam
Australia
Scotland
Churchill
JFK
Harding
Trump
Veep
Attorney General
Neocon
Captain
Archbishop
Chef
Soprano
Hobbitt
Klingon
Pete
Wesley
Carrie
Victoria
Abby
Othello
Supermarket
Dock
Farm
Cloister
Upstairs
Arsenic
Ammonia
Peas
Spaghetti
Violin
Piano
Drums
Pole
Camera
Rocket
Army
Police
Crowd
Strangers
Clueless
Mad
Hypnotism
Orgasm
Creepers
Twist
Graduation
Romance
Quantum
Imitation
Bulldog
Labour
Sunny Side

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Re: Game #198: Generation Gap

#35 Post by jarnon » Tue Mar 24, 2020 4:45 pm

73. A proud member of the Ku Klux Klan, this Mississippi Senator supported the New Deal but violently opposed any moves toward desegregation and fought against an anti-lynching bill which he claimed would “open the floodgates of hell in the South.”

I thought of Stennis, but it's his predecessor, THEODORE BILBO.

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Re: Game #198: Generation Gap

#36 Post by Vandal » Tue Mar 24, 2020 6:02 pm

126. A charter member of the College Football Hall of Fame, this tackle went from Ole Miss to the Brooklyn Dodgers (no, not those Brooklyn Dodgers) and eventually ended up in the Pro Football Hall of Fame as well

BRUISER KINARD
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Re: Game #198: Generation Gap

#37 Post by mellytu74 » Tue Mar 24, 2020 6:25 pm

107. He is the most notable Jewish title character in Victorian fiction – though he himself is not aware of his origins when the novel begins.

Isn't this FAGIN??

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Re: Game #198: Generation Gap

#38 Post by mrkelley23 » Tue Mar 24, 2020 6:48 pm

77. I thought would be Catherine Deneuve, but instead it's ISABELLE HUPPERT.
For a successful technology, reality must take precedence over public relations, for Nature cannot be fooled. -- Richard Feynman

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Re: Game #198: Generation Gap

#39 Post by mellytu74 » Tue Mar 24, 2020 7:25 pm

28. This international cinema star died in 2017 at the age of 100.

How about DANIELLE DARRIEUX?

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Re: Game #198: Generation Gap

#40 Post by mrkelley23 » Tue Mar 24, 2020 11:05 pm

9. is ANDREA DEL SARTO
14. is NORRIS COTTON
17. is CARY MIDDLECOFF
22. is RONALD COASE
31. is MICHAEL MCCARTY
36. is JACQUES LIPCHITZ
41. is BARNEY OLDFIELD
43. is DANA SCULLY
54. is JAMES MERRILL
58. is WILL DURANT
63. is ALESSANDRO MANZONI
70. is DOUGLAS KIKER
74. is PAUL RICHARDSON, JR.


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Re: Game #198: Generation Gap

#41 Post by Estonut » Wed Mar 25, 2020 5:13 am

mellytu74 wrote:
Tue Mar 24, 2020 6:25 pm
107. He is the most notable Jewish title character in Victorian fiction – though he himself is not aware of his origins when the novel begins.

Isn't this FAGIN??
I don't think Fagin is a title character.
A child of five would understand this. Send someone to fetch a child of five.
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Re: Game #198: Generation Gap

#42 Post by franktangredi » Wed Mar 25, 2020 7:39 am

Since this is so massive, and I may have made some mistakes (or written questions for which there is more than one possible answer), after the next consolidation, I will simply give you the answers I intended for any that don't match yours.

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Re: Game #198: Generation Gap

#43 Post by mrkelley23 » Wed Mar 25, 2020 8:48 am

Estonut wrote:
Wed Mar 25, 2020 5:13 am
mellytu74 wrote:
Tue Mar 24, 2020 6:25 pm
107. He is the most notable Jewish title character in Victorian fiction – though he himself is not aware of his origins when the novel begins.

Isn't this FAGIN??
I don't think Fagin is a title character.
After some searching, this clue appears to refer to Mr. RIAH of Our Mutual Friend.
For a successful technology, reality must take precedence over public relations, for Nature cannot be fooled. -- Richard Feynman

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Re: Game #198: Generation Gap

#44 Post by mrkelley23 » Wed Mar 25, 2020 9:34 am

75. is HANS KATZENJAMMER
76. is FRITZ KATZENJAMMER
79. is FRANCESCO REDI
81. is LARRY RIVERS
89. is ANDREI SERBAN
91. is FRANZ BRENTANO
95. is ANDREI CHIKATILO
100. is HASTINGS BANDA
107. is MR. RIAH
108. is HORACE WELLS
113. is MAURICE MERLEAU-PONTY
114. is ALESSANDRO SCARLATTI
116. is RUTH BENEDICT
119. is PIERRE LESCOT
120. is ANGELA BURDETT-COUTTS
121. is NIKOLAAS TINBURGEN
125. is CECIL DAY-LEWIS
130. is ERIK ERIKSON
131. is MATTHEW BOULTON
140. is GEORGE BERKELEY
141. is EDWARD BURNE-JONES

I left the DJMQs alone, in hopes that sliver might still drop by.
For a successful technology, reality must take precedence over public relations, for Nature cannot be fooled. -- Richard Feynman

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Re: Game #198: Generation Gap

#45 Post by mellytu74 » Wed Mar 25, 2020 10:58 am

mrkelley23 wrote:
Wed Mar 25, 2020 8:48 am
Estonut wrote:
Wed Mar 25, 2020 5:13 am
mellytu74 wrote:
Tue Mar 24, 2020 6:25 pm
107. He is the most notable Jewish title character in Victorian fiction – though he himself is not aware of his origins when the novel begins.

Isn't this FAGIN??
I don't think Fagin is a title character.
After some searching, this clue appears to refer to Mr. RIAH of Our Mutual Friend.
And COMPLETELY missed the "title" part of the clue. :O :O :O

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jarnon
Posts: 5140
Joined: Tue Oct 09, 2007 9:52 pm
Location: Merion, Pa.

Re: Game #198: Generation Gap

#46 Post by jarnon » Wed Mar 25, 2020 12:35 pm

Updated consolidation…

Identify the 150 people below. (Yes, that’s a lot of people, but the Tangredi is fairly simple – I hope.) Match them into 75 pairs according to a Tangredi, or principle you must discover for yourself. Then, match each pair with one of the Associated Words. No name will be used twice.

1. ABRAHAM LINCOLN
2. CHUCK BERRY
3. JOHN LOCKE
4. LEWIS CARROLL (Charles Dodgson)
5. SHAQUILLE O'NEAL
6. SUSAN SARANDON

7. This physicist won the Nobel Prize for the discoveries he made as a result of his development of the hydrogen bubble chamber.
DONALD GLASER

8. DJMQ: In 1944, he choreographed a ballet for the Metropolitan Opera – partially inspired by a painting called The Fleet’s In – that itself became the inspiration for the first of his many Broadway musicals.
Another DJMQ appears at #127.

9. This Mannerist was considered a “flawless painter” but – thanks to Vasari and Browning – he is better remembered today as an unambitious artist whose reach did not exceed his grasp.
ANDREA DEL SARTO

10. RALPH ABERNATHY
11. BERNARD OF CLAIRVAUX
12. DIANNE VON FURSTENBERG
13. GABRIEL GARCIA MARQUEZ

14. This New Hampshire Republican was the only Senator from New England to vote against the Civil Rights Act of 1964.
NORRIS COTTON

15. TONY BENNETT
16. ARTHUR EDDINGTON

17. Between 1945 and 1961, this American golfer amassed 40 PGA tour wins, placing him tenth on the all-time list.
CARY MIDDLECOFF

18. Since 2001, this American filmmaker has received three Academy Award nominations for Best Original Screenplay, two for Best Animated Feature, and one each for Best Director and Best Picture.
WES ANDERSON

19. This entrepreneur and his brothers began by buying and selling picture postcards, but things really took off in 1916 when he bought an engraving business and began selling his own creations.
JOYCE HALL

20. GREGOR SAMSA
21. CHESTER NIMITZ

22. This British economist was award the Nobel Memorial Prize “for his discovery and clarification of the significance of transaction costs and property for the institutional structure and functioning of the economy."
RONALD COASE

23. WILLIAM ALLEN WHITE
24. MICKEY COHEN
25. OLIVER CROMWELL
26. CURTIS MAYFIELD

27. This Rangers defenseman was the last winner of the Norris Trophy before Bobby Orr began his eight-year run.
HARRY HOWELL

28. This international cinema star died in 2017 at the age of 100.
DANIELLE DARRIEUX

29. This novelist won eight Spur Awards from the Western Writers of America, which also named him the great Western writer of all time.
ELMER KELTON

30. He did not invent the device most associated with his name, but he developed the stamped steel blades that made the device highly profitable.
KING GILLETTE

31. Since opening his first restaurant in Santa Monica in 1979, this celebrity chef has become the dean of California cuisine, which he is also credited with introducing to New York.
MICHAEL McCARTY

32. FLORENCE KELLEY
33. EDMUND HILLARY
34. RUDOLPH CARNAP
35. JOSEPH SMITH

36. This Cubist sculptor, who held his first solo exhibition in 1920, was later forced to flee Nazi-occupied France and eventually settled in upstate New York.
JACQUES LIPCHITZ

37. ROD BLAGOJEVICH
38. LARS ONSAGER
39. CONRAD JANIS
40. JEAN GIRAUDOUX

41. One of the eight inaugural members of the Motorsports Hall of Fame, he was the first man to drive a car 60 miles per hour on a circular track.
BARNEY OLDFIELD

42. RENATA TIBALDI

43. The “Effect” named for this fictional character refers to an increase in young women choosing to enter the field of medicine, science, and law enforcement.
DANA SCULLY

44. SEAN PARKER
45. SEYMOUR LIPSET

46. In 1777, this American general was court-martialed for his retreat from Fort Ticonderoga; fourteen years later, he lost more than 600 troops in what remains the single greatest defeat of the U.S. Army by Native American forces.
ARTHUR ST. CLAIR

47. She was the nation’s oldest First Lady … and the only once since Martha Washington to never once set foot in the White House.
ANNA HARRISON

48. RAYMOND LOWEY
49. FRANCES ARNOLD
50. EHUD OLMERT
51. NESTOR CHYLAK
52. AGNES NIXON
53. JUNIOR WELLS

54. This poet – son of the co-founder of a famous New York brokerage house – is one of only two people to win both the Glascock Prize (given to college undergraduates) and the Pulitzer Prize. (The other is Sylvia Plath.)
JAMES MERRILL

55. RICHARD AVEDON
56. DAN WHITE
57. JOE HILL

58. Though best remembered today as co-author a monumental 11-volume work, this historian first achieved prominence with a 1935 book that profiled Plato, Aristotle, Bacon, Spinoza, Voltaire, Kant, Schopenhauer, and Nietzsche.
WILL DURANT

59. AIMEE SEMPLE McPHERSON
60. BERTRAND RUSSELL
61. WILHELM ROENTGEN
62. ABE FORTAS

63. This Italian writer’s masterpiece – a novel in which two young lovers are separated by the machinations of an evil nobleman – was regarded as a veiled attack on the Austrian empire.
ALESSANDRO MANZONI

64. He was the only knighted actor to appear on an episode of The Twilight Zone.
CEDRIC HARDWICKE

65. TOM T. HALL
66. EARL ANTHONY
67. HERB KELLEHER
68. DERSHOWITZ
69. WINFIELD SCOTT

70. In addition to his 25 year stint with NBC News – during which he reported on the Vietnam War, won a Peabody for his coverage of the Black September conflict, and served as commentator on Richard Nixon’s departure from office – this correspondent also published three successful mystery novels.
DOUGLAS KIKER

71. PEGGY WHITSON
72. STEPHEN SONDHEIM

73. A proud member of the Ku Klux Klan, this Mississippi Senator supported the New Deal but violently opposed any moves toward desegregation and fought against an anti-lynching bill which he claimed would “open the floodgates of hell in the South.”
THEODORE BILBO

74. During his five seasons in the NFL (with the Seahawks and the Redskins), this wide receiver played in 54 games … which was four seasons and 53 games more than his father had managed.
PAUL RICHARDSON, JR.

75. This brunette…
HANS KATZENJAMMER

76. … and this blonde were the eponymous protagonists of the longest running comic strip in U.S. history.
FRITZ KATZENJAMMER

77. This actress has been nominated for a record 16 Cesar Awards … and one Oscar.
ISABELLE HUPPERT

78. HARPER LEE

79. In addition to his famous experiment involving maggots, this biologist also proved that vipers do not drink wine and that snake venom is not produced in the gall bladder
FRANCESCO REDI

80. SARAH BRADY

81. Paintings such as Dutch Masters and Cigars and his own take on Washington Crossing the Delaware earned this American artist the title “Grandfather of Pop Art.”
LARRY RIVERS

82. MARTHA GELHORN
83. OSCAR MEYER
84. EDWIN STANTON
85. SEWARD
86. VANNEVAR BUSH
87. BRET EASTON ELLIS
88. DASH CROFTS

89. This influential Romanian-born theatre director has worked in such venues as the Café La Mama, Circle in the Square, and the Metropolitan Opera, but perhaps his most memorable work was his innovative staging of The Cherry Orchard at Lincoln Center in 1977.
ANDREI SERBAN

90. BODE MILLER

91. This German philosopher – whose students included Edmund Husserl and Sigmund Freud – is best known for bringing the medieval concept of intentionality back into the mainstream of modern thought.
FRANZ BRENTANO

92. MARIA MONTESSORI
93. DONATELLA VERSACE
94. ISAAC MAYER WISE

95. Known as the “Rostov Ripper,” this Soviet serial killer murdered at least 52 women and children between 1978 and 1990.
ANDREI CHIKATILO

96. PETER MANSFIELD
97. CHRIS MARTIN
98. ALAN EAGLESON
99. MICHELLE RODRIGUEZ

100. In 1964, he became the first prime minister of what had been the British colony of Nyasaland.
HASTINGS BANDA

101. BARBARA KINGSOLVER
102. ELIZABETH ECKFORD
103. SERGIO ARAGONES
104. MOSHE DAYAN
105. JACK ANDERSON
106. FRANKLIN GRAHAM

107. He is the most notable Jewish title character in Victorian fiction – though he himself is not aware of his origins when the novel begins.
MR. RIAH

108. In 1844, this dentist begin his experiments with nitrous oxide by having one of his own teeth extracted by a colleague.
HORACE WELLS

109. CARLOS ZARATE SERNA
110. JAY ROCKEFELLER
111. OMAR SHARIF
112. DOROTHY SAYERS

113. This French philosopher’s 1945 book The Phenomenology of Perception is considered one of the major documents of existentialism.
MAURICE MERLEAU-PONTY

114. This Italian baroque composer is the father of both the Neapolitan school of opera and of Domenico
ALESSANDRO SCARLATTI

115. ESTEE LAUDER

116. In 1946, this American anthropologist published an acclaimed study of Japanese culture and society.
RUTH BENEDICT

117. This English nobleman was briefly the brother-in-law of the king – and, for a longer period, the fourth husband of his former brother-in-law’s widow. Got that?
THOMAS SEYMOUR

118. CHARLES ATLAS

119. Among the designs of this French Renaissance architect is the wing of the Louvre that now bears his name.
PIERRE LESCOT

120. In recognition of her many philanthropic works – which ranged from endowing a haven for young prostitutes to financing efforts to clean up London’s drinking water to serving as president of the British Beekeepers’ Association – this Baroness became the first woman to be presented with the Freedom of the City of London.
ANGELA BURDETT-COUTTS

121. A pioneer in the modern science of animal behavior, this Dutch biologist made his reputation with his 1951 book The Study of Instinct.
NIKOLAAS TINBURGEN

122. VICTOR EMMANUEL
123. MANFRED MANN
124. CAROLE LANDIS

125. Under a pseudonym, this British Poet Laureate also wrote a popular series of mystery novels featuring an amateur detective originally modeled on W.H. Auden.
CECIL DAY-LEWIS

126. A charter member of the College Football Hall of Fame, this tackle went from Ole Miss to the Brooklyn Dodgers (no, not those Brooklyn Dodgers) and eventually ended up in the Pro Football Hall of Fame as well.
BRUISER KINARD

127. DJMQ: A onetime member of the Lester Horton Dance Theatre, she moved on to Broadway where she met the tall Trinidadian who became her husband – and with whom she choreographed her signature solo.

128. LOUIS JOLIET

129. He was hanged for horse theft in 1739, at the age of 34, but is far better known for another type of crime.
DICK TURPIN

130. This German-American developmental psychologist is credited with coining the term “identity crisis” to describe the failure to achieve ego individuation during adolescence.
ERIK ERIKSON

131. James Watt’s business partner, he also made major contributions to the process for minting coins.
MATTHEW BOULTON

132. CHRISTOPHER LATHAM SHOLES
133. NATHANIEL WEST
134. JEFF LYNNE
135. ROLAND EMMERICH
136. PAT LEAHY
137. ROD LAVER
138. BUCK ROGERS
139. FANNY FARMER

140. This influential 18th century Irish philosopher formulated the concept of immaterialism, which contends that objects such as tables and chairs cannot exist without being perceived
GEORGE BERKELEY

141. The works of this Pre-Raphaelite painter – a colleague of Rosetti and Morris – included a watercolor called Love Among the Ruins which was accidentally destroyed by a cleaner who mistook it for an oil painting.
EDWARD BURNE-JONES

142. OTIS WILLIAMS
143. MOTHER ANN LEE

144. This actor received four Oscar nominations – the first under the direction of Frank Capra and the last under the direction of Alfred Hitchcock.
CLAUDE RAINS

145. HANNIBAL
146. KUBLAI KHAN
147. DAVID ORTIZ
148. HAROLD PINTER
149. MICHAEL FARADAY
150. RACHEL CARSON

ASSOCIATED WORDS
7
22
86
500
F
H
IQ
CBC
Chicago
Chicago
Cleveland
Philadelphia
Las Vegas
Atlantic City
Oklahoma
Idaho
Nebraska
New England
Germany
India
Israel
Vietnam
Australia
Scotland
Churchill
JFK
Harding
Trump
Veep
Attorney General
Neocon
Captain
Archbishop
Chef
Soprano
Hobbitt
Klingon
Pete
Wesley
Carrie
Victoria
Abby
Othello
Supermarket
Dock
Farm
Cloister
Upstairs
Arsenic
Ammonia
Peas
Spaghetti
Violin
Piano
Drums
Pole
Camera
Rocket
Army
Police
Crowd
Strangers
Clueless
Mad
Hypnotism
Orgasm
Creepers
Twist
Graduation
Romance
Quantum
Imitation
Bulldog
Labour
Sunny Side

Now somebody please solve the Tangredi!

User avatar
franktangredi
Posts: 5894
Joined: Tue Feb 12, 2008 4:34 pm

Re: Game #198: Generation Gap

#47 Post by franktangredi » Wed Mar 25, 2020 2:38 pm

7. I was looking for LUIS ALVAREZ, who also won the Nobel Prize for his work connected with the bubble chamber.
31. I was looking for JONATHAN WAXMAN.
107. Mr. Riah is not a title character. I’ll let this one sit for a while, but I will say that Dickens is not involved at all.
109. I don’t know if Serna ever killed an opponent in the ring, but the boxer I’m looking for is LUPE PINTOR.

Everything else is right, but some of the names will have to be in a somewhat different form for the Tangredi solution.


jarnon wrote:
Wed Mar 25, 2020 12:35 pm
Updated consolidation…

Identify the 150 people below. (Yes, that’s a lot of people, but the Tangredi is fairly simple – I hope.) Match them into 75 pairs according to a Tangredi, or principle you must discover for yourself. Then, match each pair with one of the Associated Words. No name will be used twice.

1. ABRAHAM LINCOLN
2. CHUCK BERRY
3. JOHN LOCKE
4. LEWIS CARROLL (Charles Dodgson)
5. SHAQUILLE O'NEAL
6. SUSAN SARANDON

7. This physicist won the Nobel Prize for the discoveries he made as a result of his development of the hydrogen bubble chamber.
DONALD GLASER

8. DJMQ: In 1944, he choreographed a ballet for the Metropolitan Opera – partially inspired by a painting called The Fleet’s In – that itself became the inspiration for the first of his many Broadway musicals.
Another DJMQ appears at #127.

9. This Mannerist was considered a “flawless painter” but – thanks to Vasari and Browning – he is better remembered today as an unambitious artist whose reach did not exceed his grasp.
ANDREA DEL SARTO

10. RALPH ABERNATHY
11. BERNARD OF CLAIRVAUX
12. DIANNE VON FURSTENBERG
13. GABRIEL GARCIA MARQUEZ

14. This New Hampshire Republican was the only Senator from New England to vote against the Civil Rights Act of 1964.
NORRIS COTTON

15. TONY BENNETT
16. ARTHUR EDDINGTON

17. Between 1945 and 1961, this American golfer amassed 40 PGA tour wins, placing him tenth on the all-time list.
CARY MIDDLECOFF

18. Since 2001, this American filmmaker has received three Academy Award nominations for Best Original Screenplay, two for Best Animated Feature, and one each for Best Director and Best Picture.
WES ANDERSON

19. This entrepreneur and his brothers began by buying and selling picture postcards, but things really took off in 1916 when he bought an engraving business and began selling his own creations.
JOYCE HALL

20. GREGOR SAMSA
21. CHESTER NIMITZ

22. This British economist was award the Nobel Memorial Prize “for his discovery and clarification of the significance of transaction costs and property for the institutional structure and functioning of the economy."
RONALD COASE

23. WILLIAM ALLEN WHITE
24. MICKEY COHEN
25. OLIVER CROMWELL
26. CURTIS MAYFIELD

27. This Rangers defenseman was the last winner of the Norris Trophy before Bobby Orr began his eight-year run.
HARRY HOWELL

28. This international cinema star died in 2017 at the age of 100.
DANIELLE DARRIEUX

29. This novelist won eight Spur Awards from the Western Writers of America, which also named him the great Western writer of all time.
ELMER KELTON

30. He did not invent the device most associated with his name, but he developed the stamped steel blades that made the device highly profitable.
KING GILLETTE

31. Since opening his first restaurant in Santa Monica in 1979, this celebrity chef has become the dean of California cuisine, which he is also credited with introducing to New York.
MICHAEL McCARTY

32. FLORENCE KELLEY
33. EDMUND HILLARY
34. RUDOLPH CARNAP
35. JOSEPH SMITH

36. This Cubist sculptor, who held his first solo exhibition in 1920, was later forced to flee Nazi-occupied France and eventually settled in upstate New York.
JACQUES LIPCHITZ

37. ROD BLAGOJEVICH
38. LARS ONSAGER
39. CONRAD JANIS
40. JEAN GIRAUDOUX

41. One of the eight inaugural members of the Motorsports Hall of Fame, he was the first man to drive a car 60 miles per hour on a circular track.
BARNEY OLDFIELD

42. RENATA TIBALDI

43. The “Effect” named for this fictional character refers to an increase in young women choosing to enter the field of medicine, science, and law enforcement.
DANA SCULLY

44. SEAN PARKER
45. SEYMOUR LIPSET

46. In 1777, this American general was court-martialed for his retreat from Fort Ticonderoga; fourteen years later, he lost more than 600 troops in what remains the single greatest defeat of the U.S. Army by Native American forces.
ARTHUR ST. CLAIR

47. She was the nation’s oldest First Lady … and the only once since Martha Washington to never once set foot in the White House.
ANNA HARRISON

48. RAYMOND LOWEY
49. FRANCES ARNOLD
50. EHUD OLMERT
51. NESTOR CHYLAK
52. AGNES NIXON
53. JUNIOR WELLS

54. This poet – son of the co-founder of a famous New York brokerage house – is one of only two people to win both the Glascock Prize (given to college undergraduates) and the Pulitzer Prize. (The other is Sylvia Plath.)
JAMES MERRILL

55. RICHARD AVEDON
56. DAN WHITE
57. JOE HILL

58. Though best remembered today as co-author a monumental 11-volume work, this historian first achieved prominence with a 1935 book that profiled Plato, Aristotle, Bacon, Spinoza, Voltaire, Kant, Schopenhauer, and Nietzsche.
WILL DURANT

59. AIMEE SEMPLE McPHERSON
60. BERTRAND RUSSELL
61. WILHELM ROENTGEN
62. ABE FORTAS

63. This Italian writer’s masterpiece – a novel in which two young lovers are separated by the machinations of an evil nobleman – was regarded as a veiled attack on the Austrian empire.
ALESSANDRO MANZONI

64. He was the only knighted actor to appear on an episode of The Twilight Zone.
CEDRIC HARDWICKE

65. TOM T. HALL
66. EARL ANTHONY
67. HERB KELLEHER
68. DERSHOWITZ
69. WINFIELD SCOTT

70. In addition to his 25 year stint with NBC News – during which he reported on the Vietnam War, won a Peabody for his coverage of the Black September conflict, and served as commentator on Richard Nixon’s departure from office – this correspondent also published three successful mystery novels.
DOUGLAS KIKER

71. PEGGY WHITSON
72. STEPHEN SONDHEIM

73. A proud member of the Ku Klux Klan, this Mississippi Senator supported the New Deal but violently opposed any moves toward desegregation and fought against an anti-lynching bill which he claimed would “open the floodgates of hell in the South.”
THEODORE BILBO

74. During his five seasons in the NFL (with the Seahawks and the Redskins), this wide receiver played in 54 games … which was four seasons and 53 games more than his father had managed.
PAUL RICHARDSON, JR.

75. This brunette…
HANS KATZENJAMMER

76. … and this blonde were the eponymous protagonists of the longest running comic strip in U.S. history.
FRITZ KATZENJAMMER

77. This actress has been nominated for a record 16 Cesar Awards … and one Oscar.
ISABELLE HUPPERT

78. HARPER LEE

79. In addition to his famous experiment involving maggots, this biologist also proved that vipers do not drink wine and that snake venom is not produced in the gall bladder
FRANCESCO REDI

80. SARAH BRADY

81. Paintings such as Dutch Masters and Cigars and his own take on Washington Crossing the Delaware earned this American artist the title “Grandfather of Pop Art.”
LARRY RIVERS

82. MARTHA GELHORN
83. OSCAR MEYER
84. EDWIN STANTON
85. SEWARD
86. VANNEVAR BUSH
87. BRET EASTON ELLIS
88. DASH CROFTS

89. This influential Romanian-born theatre director has worked in such venues as the Café La Mama, Circle in the Square, and the Metropolitan Opera, but perhaps his most memorable work was his innovative staging of The Cherry Orchard at Lincoln Center in 1977.
ANDREI SERBAN

90. BODE MILLER

91. This German philosopher – whose students included Edmund Husserl and Sigmund Freud – is best known for bringing the medieval concept of intentionality back into the mainstream of modern thought.
FRANZ BRENTANO

92. MARIA MONTESSORI
93. DONATELLA VERSACE
94. ISAAC MAYER WISE

95. Known as the “Rostov Ripper,” this Soviet serial killer murdered at least 52 women and children between 1978 and 1990.
ANDREI CHIKATILO

96. PETER MANSFIELD
97. CHRIS MARTIN
98. ALAN EAGLESON
99. MICHELLE RODRIGUEZ

100. In 1964, he became the first prime minister of what had been the British colony of Nyasaland.
HASTINGS BANDA

101. BARBARA KINGSOLVER
102. ELIZABETH ECKFORD
103. SERGIO ARAGONES
104. MOSHE DAYAN
105. JACK ANDERSON
106. FRANKLIN GRAHAM

107. He is the most notable Jewish title character in Victorian fiction – though he himself is not aware of his origins when the novel begins.
MR. RIAH

108. In 1844, this dentist begin his experiments with nitrous oxide by having one of his own teeth extracted by a colleague.
HORACE WELLS

109. CARLOS ZARATE SERNA
110. JAY ROCKEFELLER
111. OMAR SHARIF
112. DOROTHY SAYERS

113. This French philosopher’s 1945 book The Phenomenology of Perception is considered one of the major documents of existentialism.
MAURICE MERLEAU-PONTY

114. This Italian baroque composer is the father of both the Neapolitan school of opera and of Domenico
ALESSANDRO SCARLATTI

115. ESTEE LAUDER

116. In 1946, this American anthropologist published an acclaimed study of Japanese culture and society.
RUTH BENEDICT

117. This English nobleman was briefly the brother-in-law of the king – and, for a longer period, the fourth husband of his former brother-in-law’s widow. Got that?
THOMAS SEYMOUR

118. CHARLES ATLAS

119. Among the designs of this French Renaissance architect is the wing of the Louvre that now bears his name.
PIERRE LESCOT

120. In recognition of her many philanthropic works – which ranged from endowing a haven for young prostitutes to financing efforts to clean up London’s drinking water to serving as president of the British Beekeepers’ Association – this Baroness became the first woman to be presented with the Freedom of the City of London.
ANGELA BURDETT-COUTTS

121. A pioneer in the modern science of animal behavior, this Dutch biologist made his reputation with his 1951 book The Study of Instinct.
NIKOLAAS TINBURGEN

122. VICTOR EMMANUEL
123. MANFRED MANN
124. CAROLE LANDIS

125. Under a pseudonym, this British Poet Laureate also wrote a popular series of mystery novels featuring an amateur detective originally modeled on W.H. Auden.
CECIL DAY-LEWIS

126. A charter member of the College Football Hall of Fame, this tackle went from Ole Miss to the Brooklyn Dodgers (no, not those Brooklyn Dodgers) and eventually ended up in the Pro Football Hall of Fame as well.
BRUISER KINARD

127. DJMQ: A onetime member of the Lester Horton Dance Theatre, she moved on to Broadway where she met the tall Trinidadian who became her husband – and with whom she choreographed her signature solo.

128. LOUIS JOLIET

129. He was hanged for horse theft in 1739, at the age of 34, but is far better known for another type of crime.
DICK TURPIN

130. This German-American developmental psychologist is credited with coining the term “identity crisis” to describe the failure to achieve ego individuation during adolescence.
ERIK ERIKSON

131. James Watt’s business partner, he also made major contributions to the process for minting coins.
MATTHEW BOULTON

132. CHRISTOPHER LATHAM SHOLES
133. NATHANIEL WEST
134. JEFF LYNNE
135. ROLAND EMMERICH
136. PAT LEAHY
137. ROD LAVER
138. BUCK ROGERS
139. FANNY FARMER

140. This influential 18th century Irish philosopher formulated the concept of immaterialism, which contends that objects such as tables and chairs cannot exist without being perceived
GEORGE BERKELEY

141. The works of this Pre-Raphaelite painter – a colleague of Rosetti and Morris – included a watercolor called Love Among the Ruins which was accidentally destroyed by a cleaner who mistook it for an oil painting.
EDWARD BURNE-JONES

142. OTIS WILLIAMS
143. MOTHER ANN LEE

144. This actor received four Oscar nominations – the first under the direction of Frank Capra and the last under the direction of Alfred Hitchcock.
CLAUDE RAINS

145. HANNIBAL
146. KUBLAI KHAN
147. DAVID ORTIZ
148. HAROLD PINTER
149. MICHAEL FARADAY
150. RACHEL CARSON

ASSOCIATED WORDS
7
22
86
500
F
H
IQ
CBC
Chicago
Chicago
Cleveland
Philadelphia
Las Vegas
Atlantic City
Oklahoma
Idaho
Nebraska
New England
Germany
India
Israel
Vietnam
Australia
Scotland
Churchill
JFK
Harding
Trump
Veep
Attorney General
Neocon
Captain
Archbishop
Chef
Soprano
Hobbitt
Klingon
Pete
Wesley
Carrie
Victoria
Abby
Othello
Supermarket
Dock
Farm
Cloister
Upstairs
Arsenic
Ammonia
Peas
Spaghetti
Violin
Piano
Drums
Pole
Camera
Rocket
Army
Police
Crowd
Strangers
Clueless
Mad
Hypnotism
Orgasm
Creepers
Twist
Graduation
Romance
Quantum
Imitation
Bulldog
Labour
Sunny Side

Now somebody please solve the Tangredi!

User avatar
mellytu74
Posts: 8570
Joined: Mon Oct 08, 2007 7:02 pm
Location: Philadelphia, PA

Re: Game #198: Generation Gap

#48 Post by mellytu74 » Wed Mar 25, 2020 4:30 pm

107. Mr. Riah is not a title character. I’ll let this one sit for a while, but I will say that Dickens is not involved at all.

Apparently, this is George Eliot's DANIEL DERONDA

User avatar
franktangredi
Posts: 5894
Joined: Tue Feb 12, 2008 4:34 pm

Re: Game #198: Generation Gap

#49 Post by franktangredi » Wed Mar 25, 2020 6:05 pm

mellytu74 wrote:
Wed Mar 25, 2020 4:30 pm
107. Mr. Riah is not a title character. I’ll let this one sit for a while, but I will say that Dickens is not involved at all.

Apparently, this is George Eliot's DANIEL DERONDA
It certainly is!

User avatar
littlebeast13
Dumbass
Posts: 30223
Joined: Mon Oct 08, 2007 7:20 pm
Location: Between the Suavitel and Fabuloso
Contact:

Re: Game #198: Generation Gap

#50 Post by littlebeast13 » Fri Mar 27, 2020 10:42 pm

73. A proud member of the Ku Klux Klan, this Mississippi Senator supported the New Deal but violently opposed any moves toward desegregation and fought against an anti-lynching bill which he claimed would “open the floodgates of hell in the South.”
THEODORE BILBO

ASSOCIATED WORDS:

Hobbitt



This can not be a coincidence. I can't come up with the link, but maybe it will help someone else...

lb13
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